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Old 11-18-2017, 08:12 AM   #21
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Nice work WayneG.
All good advice.

Looked at my chassis rail pipe pic again and that is rearward of the step I think, as I can sees a rear tire.
One other thing I did do while I was under there, was clean all the chunks of gravel off the lower chassis leg!
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Old 11-18-2017, 08:12 AM   #22
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Top, large in braided cover is electrical... I think 12v, but not sure.
Black thinner wire, zip tired to that is rear view camera cable...
Just below that, I think is rear leveler hydraulic line... I think.
Upper weeping is Main Fuel feed line.
Mid is brake line, I assume.
Lower, weeping is fuel return line.

The two running along the lower chassis return I think are 120v.... I think....
I'm just gonna buy fuses in bulk...

Quote:
Originally Posted by WayneG View Post
Depending on where your photo is from, one hose may be for the vacuum step.
Another gas line you may have will be a 3/8 hose to the top of the gas tank going anywhere Airstream thought they could hide it. Mine just dangled near the rear bumper. I replace the hose and added a roll over vent valve cap coming through the plastic above the rear bumper. You dont want fuel coming out if you ever roll the MH.

For my fuel lines to and from the engine, I increased the size for the TBI system and ran solid lines all the way, (except for a short section on the return line at the rear of the engine) That is a week spot I should install braided steel hose like the supply)
The stock fuel tubing diameter on the P30 chassis is to small for the length of the run to the rear for TBI and marginal for a carb.

DONT buy cheap rubber fuel line! Get the good stuff that is rated for the job and can handle ethyl alcohol!
I also have a large inline fuel filter that was installed by a PO I removed all the rubber hoses and went to steel and added a fuel pressure gauge sender to troubleshoot fuel problems.

I also have some short sections of rubber on low pressure connections at the tank.
They are the generator supply, the engine return line, and the tank vent.
The fuel pump output is plumbed all in steel. BTW, my fuel pump pushes 30PSI to the injectors, not the normal 15 in stock setups, or 5 to 6 in a carb setup.

In all I probably removed over 8' of old rubber hose
That roll over vent is a great idea
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Old 11-18-2017, 09:00 AM   #23
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Regarding circuit breakers/fuses near a lead-acid battery, don't do it. Hydrogen buildup, a normal by product of the discharge process can build up in a compartment. When the breaker opens, there is a spark, and a possible explosion.
AGM and Li ion batteries are the exception, but most of us use standard lead-acid.
This is the reason fusible links are used, and you will not see a fuse or breaker near the battery in a factory built vehicle
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Old 11-18-2017, 09:04 AM   #24
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Regarding circuit breakers/fuses near a lead-acid battery, don't do it. Hydrogen buildup, a normal by product of the discharge process can build up in a compartment. When the breaker opens, there is a spark, and a possible explosion.
AGM and Li ion batteries are the exception, but most of us use standard lead-acid.
This is the reason fusible links are used, and you will not see a fuse or breaker near the battery in a factory built vehicle


Most all modern Fords use maxi fuses near the battery, as do other marks. Fusible links blow with heat, (molten metal), and potential sparks too.
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Old 11-18-2017, 09:42 AM   #25
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outbackga View Post
Regarding circuit breakers/fuses near a lead-acid battery, don't do it. Hydrogen buildup, a normal by product of the discharge process can build up in a compartment. When the breaker opens, there is a spark, and a possible explosion.
AGM and Li ion batteries are the exception, but most of us use standard lead-acid.
This is the reason fusible links are used, and you will not see a fuse or breaker near the battery in a factory built vehicle
These are sealed so I am not worried about hydrogen explosions for my fuses.

Without any protection, I bet you will get a big arc when something else lets go
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Old 11-18-2017, 10:30 AM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Outbackga View Post
Regarding circuit breakers/fuses near a lead-acid battery, don't do it. Hydrogen buildup, a normal by product of the discharge process can build up in a compartment. When the breaker opens, there is a spark, and a possible explosion.
AGM and Li ion batteries are the exception, but most of us use standard lead-acid.
This is the reason fusible links are used, and you will not see a fuse or breaker near the battery in a factory built vehicle
almost every hood I've opened has a fuse box next to the battery

That said, more air moves around in an engine bay than a battery drawer, so it's more of a concern.

but, most fuses are sealed so as to be weather proof, so I think the risk is very small here.

Quote:
Originally Posted by WayneG View Post
These are sealed so I am not worried about hydrogen explosions for my fuses.

Without any protection, I bet you will get a big arc when something else lets go
I really like those, a nice neat package
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Old 11-18-2017, 10:39 AM   #27
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It’s a good point, and seeing WayneG’ exploding battery was a shock.
One point I think is the battery tray is not sealed, does not have a lid, and when shut there is 2” at least above it.
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Old 11-18-2017, 10:53 AM   #28
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It’s a good point, and seeing WayneG’ exploding battery was a shock.
One point I think is the battery tray is not sealed, does not have a lid, and when shut there is 2” at least above it.
That may be part of my screw up for the blown battery.
I put a lexan cover over the battery drawer to keep road grime out.
It was vented around the edges using 3/4" foam tape with gaps around the edges of the cover for venting. It may not have been enough air flow, or maybe it was low water in the battery or both?
Either way, no more cover on my battery drawer! I also make sure the batteries do not block the vent holes in the bottom of the drawer.
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Old 11-18-2017, 11:04 AM   #29
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Originally Posted by WayneG View Post
That may be part of my screw up for the blown battery.
I put a lexan cover over the battery drawer to keep road grime out.
It was vented around the edges using 3/4" foam tape with gaps around the edges of the cover for venting. It may not have been enough air flow, or maybe it was low water in the battery or both?
Either way, no more cover on my battery drawer! I also make sure the batteries do not block the vent holes in the bottom of the drawer.
A 12V brush-less computer fan wired to be enabled with the key on may be cheap and easy peace of mind, like the blower fan on a boat. (note, brush-less is magnetic, brushed spark. Don't use brushed, that would make things worse). Probably totally overkill though.

Or sealed lead-acid/marine are more expensive but it's peace of mind.
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Old 11-18-2017, 12:28 PM   #30
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I also make sure the batteries do not block the vent holes in the bottom of the drawer.
Oh, is that what these were on my Battery tray???
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Old 11-18-2017, 12:36 PM   #31
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WayneG View Post
That may be part of my screw up for the blown battery.
I put a lexan cover over the battery drawer to keep road grime out.
It was vented around the edges using 3/4" foam tape with gaps around the edges of the cover for venting. It may not have been enough air flow, or maybe it was low water in the battery or both?
Either way, no more cover on my battery drawer! I also make sure the batteries do not block the vent holes in the bottom of the drawer.


Chances are that the battery had an internal short AND was low on water. I doubt your cover was a contributing factor.
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Old 11-19-2017, 07:54 PM   #32
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Found it!

This is a picture of the main feed, rubber fuel pipe, that scared me to death.

This was on the passenger side, front of the engine.
It takes fuel from the hard fuel line, mounted on the frame rail, to the mechanical fuel pump on the engine.
It is pressurized to 6psi, by the rear electric fuel pump.

It is subject to flex as the engine moves, heat from the block, and exhaust manifolds, and is about 20" or so from the starter, and alternator.

This pipe was disintegrating, and weeping at the worm clip, junction into the mechanical pump, but it is/was not obvious unless you crawl under and look with a flashlight.
I twisted the pipe slightly to see if I could get at the worm clip head and the outer was completely loose from the inner, the inner fractured and sprayed fuel everywhere.
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Old 11-24-2020, 06:57 PM   #33
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Fuel Pressure issue on 1984 Airstream 345.

My airstream came with the Throttle Boy Fuel Injection system. Due to computer malfunction of the TBI, I took out the entire system and installed a 4 barrel Rochester Carb. Upon starting the fuel was pouring out from the Carbureter. I went to Autozone and bought me a fuel pressure regulator but the regulator failed. I thought the regulator was defective so I exchange with a second regulator and that also failed and the fule kept pouring out of the Carburetor. I then spoke to the Airstream dealer who said that the old system was for the high pressure TBI system therefore I would need a high pressure fuel regulator. I have not tried it yet, but it makes sense. Anyone had the same or similar experience? Your input would be grately appreciated. Thank you.
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Old 11-24-2020, 07:09 PM   #34
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For a carburetor, your fuel pressure needs to be around 6-7 psi. Fuel injection systems can be up to 60 psi. This is definitely why you are pouring fuel out of the carb.
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Old 11-24-2020, 11:03 PM   #35
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Yep, input pressure is too high for most regulators to handle so the regulator fails

You need something like this
https://www.summitracing.com/parts/a...4aAmN-EALw_wcB

Or this
https://aeromotiveinc.com/product/ef...ure-regulator/

Or you can change out your fuel pump

Make sure you have the return line hooked up
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Old 11-25-2020, 08:07 AM   #36
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I've seen on eBay pressure regulator with range 0-150 PSI, would it be OK or should I buy a two stage pressure regulator? After installing a new pressure regulator, whould I set up the pressure between 6 and 12 PSI for climbing hilly area that would require more fuel?
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Old 11-25-2020, 10:25 AM   #37
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I've seen on eBay pressure regulator with range 0-150 PSI, would it be OK or should I buy a two stage pressure regulator? After installing a new pressure regulator, whould I set up the pressure between 6 and 12 PSI for climbing hilly area that would require more fuel?
Is this a limp home fix, or permanent? If permanent I'd go two stage of known quality.

Set the pressure to whatever the input specification of the carb is
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Old 11-25-2020, 10:56 AM   #38
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Surely the permanent fix is a fuel pump with the correct pressure rating. The regulator will just create back pressure for the original pump to work against.
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Old 11-25-2020, 11:27 AM   #39
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Surely the permanent fix is a fuel pump with the correct pressure rating. The regulator will just create back pressure for the original pump to work against.
That would certainly be a good long term fix and possibly cheaper, but with the right regulator I'm not sure the efi pump would notice any difference.

There is a return line, and isn't the regulator creating the same back pressure in the carb setup that the pump would normally expect in an efi setup?

And I believe fuel flow volume is roughly the same in both setups, both use approximately the same amount of gasoline going down the road, if the return line on this regulator returns the same amount of fuel as the old efi regulator did I don't think the pump would know the difference



Rewinding a bit, can I ask what went wrong with the EFI system and what system it was?
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Old 11-26-2020, 03:25 PM   #40
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I had a dead short of the battery cable going across the a-frame. No fire, the engine died and I rolled to the shoulder. It was colder than a well digger a-s. So I call a wrecker Took from 7:00 till lunch time to get it to a shop. They push it in the shop and we all went to lunch. They called before I got our food eaten that it was ready. With 3 dead batteries it took out the alternator before we got home.
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