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Old 07-18-2008, 11:25 AM   #141
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Battling SE Texas Heat!

Recently I have been forced to only sneak in time on the Silver Belly in the early mornings due to the heat. The small window unit works but is no match for a sun bathed, non insulated tin can.

This morning I decided to see if my camping canopy might help. It came with 6' legs which were not tall enough. I discovered that the legs were the same size as cyclone fence top rail. I happen to have some from an old fence that I tore down. I cut them to 8' and they fit fine. There is 100# +/- of concrete in each of the buckets. I am hoping that I can keep it cool enough to be able to work in the evenings after closing hours. I will let you know.

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Old 07-18-2008, 12:03 PM   #142
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Originally Posted by vhord View Post
Recently I have been forced to only sneak in time on the Silver Belly in the early mornings due to the heat. The small window unit works but is no match for a sun bathed, non insulated tin can.

This morning I decided to see if my camping canopy might help. It came with 6' legs which were not tall enough. I discovered that the legs were the same size as cyclone fence top rail. I happen to have some from an old fence that I tore down. I cut them to 8' and they fit fine. There is 100# +/- of concrete in each of the buckets. I am hoping that I can keep it cool enough to be able to work in the evenings after closing hours. I will let you know.

Attachment 63998
That might just do the trick. You also will have a chance to get a good feel for the difference that the foil insulation will make when you get it installed.

Malcolm
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Old 07-21-2008, 05:52 PM   #143
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I have read in the posts that the end caps are structural, and the rear end cap was destroyed when it was removed to repair a badly damaged floor and rusted rear frame. I am having a hard time convincing my husband that these were truly structural and I think I see his point in that there are no ribs in the back and the aluminum of the interior skins is so thin, I am having a hard time seeing how they could be structural as well. There are limited attachment points for the end cap/interior skin. This all leads me to my questions? Can I move the airstream without a form of reconstructed end cap? I used .063 aluminum to seal up the holes in the exterior skin where the water heater and the furnace were because I have decided to go all electric. Do I need to use the heavier aluminum or can I use the .032 to construct the end caps? I know that this subject has been discussed extensively, is there a link with instructions on constructing a new end cap out of aluminum?

Jennifer
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Old 07-22-2008, 08:36 PM   #144
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I have read in the posts that the end caps are structural, and the rear end cap was destroyed when it was removed to repair a badly damaged floor and rusted rear frame. I am having a hard time convincing my husband that these were truly structural and I think I see his point in that there are no ribs in the back and the aluminum of the interior skins is so thin, I am having a hard time seeing how they could be structural as well. There are limited attachment points for the end cap/interior skin. This all leads me to my questions? Can I move the airstream without a form of reconstructed end cap? I used .063 aluminum to seal up the holes in the exterior skin where the water heater and the furnace were because I have decided to go all electric. Do I need to use the heavier aluminum or can I use the .032 to construct the end caps? I know that this subject has been discussed extensively, is there a link with instructions on constructing a new end cap out of aluminum?

Jennifer
Jennifer,

I personally think you would be OK moving your trailer without endcaps installed.

Check out the following threads:

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f116...aps-43625.html

The last post in the above thread references a single post in the following thread where you can find lots of detail about Zeppelinium's great job of building aluminum end caps.

http://www.airforums.com/forums/f421...ion-37609.html

Malcolm
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Old 07-23-2008, 04:31 AM   #145
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The fiberglass end cap is for all intensive purposes a big curved rib. It is the internal structure in the ends. the reason it does not have a lot of rivets in it, is because it does not need that many. I think you can move the trailer short distances, but would not recommend putting out on the road that way. Think about you house, with out the end cap you are kind of taking the roof trusses out and letting the plywood sheathing support your roof.
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Old 07-23-2008, 10:05 AM   #146
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Subfloor exposure at threshold

After installing my new steps I noticed that I had no real protection of my subfloor at the door from weather. Especially any rain that would be picked up while traveling. I inspected my old step assembly and it also had had no protection. Besides bad door gaskets this might have contributed to my floor's rot in that area.

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I made something that I think might be okay. I still have to cut a couple of notches in the top so that it will fit under the threshold. I made it in two pieces that overlap 2" (front over rear) because it makes it easier to install. (I realize that my fabrication skills might not come up to some others standards but it was the best I could do.)

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Has anyone else had this problem? If so how did you approach it? I have not installed it yet so any suggestions will be welcomed.
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Old 07-23-2008, 10:34 AM   #147
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I have a very vague recolection that there was a sheet of aluminum on the bottom side of the plywood over the stair area in my unit. Did you find anything like that?

Malcolm
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Old 07-23-2008, 12:37 PM   #148
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I have a very vague recolection that there was a sheet of aluminum on the bottom side of the plywood over the stair area in my unit. Did you find anything like that?

Malcolm
Yes, I have that. In fact I replaced it with a new piece as the old piece was too small for my new steps. But it is just a flat piece that covers the bottom side of the subfloor. My concern is with the outer edge of the subfloor. If you get down low enough and look just above the step you see that bare plywood edge (pic #2 above).
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Old 07-23-2008, 01:36 PM   #149
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If I understand where this is on the camper, mine has c-channel in that area for the floor to rest in. I can snap a few pics for you tonight if you need it.

I think your new cover will work fine, but I would "butter" the back of it heavily with Vulkem or Sikaflex, i.e., seal out as much weather as possible. Then seal around the outside with the same, just to make sure water can't get in.

Am I making sense?

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Old 07-23-2008, 02:18 PM   #150
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Jim,

I am probably not making myself clear. If I understand you, the C that you are referring to was under my old subfloor and was attached to the outriggers. The legs on that C were pointed downward so they would not protect the edge of the plywood. I figured that piece was there to add support to the threshold. You can see it in this picture of my old step assembly.

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I sort of copied that design when I built my new set.

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The problem lies in the fact that there is no "banana wrap" under the door threshold. On the rest of the trailer the banana wrap protects the edges of the subfloor from water being splashed or sprayed up from the road.

I know I am probably making this about as clear as mud.
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Old 07-23-2008, 04:03 PM   #151
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Here's a picture of the same area on our '73. The threshold and the C-channel are all one piece of aluminum. The C-channel protects the outer edge of the floor as you are describing--if I understand you correctly. I think I have a picture from the inside before the floor went back in as well. I'll see if I can find it.

Those blue lights are LED's I added to illuminate the step area.

Jim
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Old 07-23-2008, 04:08 PM   #152
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Here it is from the inside before the floor was put back in. The C-channel can be seen underneath the hose for the shop van. There is a piece of the orginal floor stuck in there. Not a great picture, but maybe it will hel some.

Jim
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Old 07-23-2008, 04:56 PM   #153
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Jim,

That angle (under the hose) that I think that I see in the pic is pretty much what I am attempting to create plus fill in the sections of the banana wrap that are missing from that area. Thanks for the reply.

BTW - I will use plenty of polyurethane caulk! I just don't want that sucker to leak for a long time if I can help it.
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Old 07-23-2008, 05:36 PM   #154
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That's what I was thinking. It looks like you're on the right track. Just trying to give you a couple of visuals from later years. It almost looks like Airstream figured out a couple of years down the road the same thing you have discovered. Namely, "don't leave wooden floor parts open to the elements".

Good luck with it. You're doing a great job, keep it up. And keep posting your "finds". Others will appreciate the information in later years.

Now back to cleaning my walls (again). Trying to get ready to paint those dang vinyl walls.

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Old 07-23-2008, 07:25 PM   #155
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That's what I was thinking. It looks like you're on the right track. Just trying to give you a couple of visuals from later years. It almost looks like Airstream figured out a couple of years down the road the same thing you have discovered. Namely, "don't leave wooden floor parts open to the elements".
Thanks. At least I know that.

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Now back to cleaning my walls (again). Trying to get ready to paint those dang vinyl walls.

Jim
That will be my next project after replacing a couple of outside panels. I keep up with your project and I like my position being a little (or a lot) behind you!
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Old 08-06-2008, 12:08 PM   #156
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Tailgate ponding seepage

I am still tinkering around for a possible solution to the seepage problems on Airstream tailgates due to ponding. I mentioned this on a previous thread.

This morning I played around with some light guage (.0092") aluminum flashing. I know it looks sort of crude but it gave me hopes that it was at least possible to fabricate some sort of flashing at a curved angle. Even though this attempt has wringles in the metal I think it would still work if worked up underneath the outer skin or attached to the outside with Vulkem.

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I would then overlay it with another piece of .040 aluminum (represented by the lumber in the following picture) and the rest would be covered by the rub rail. Therefore none of the flashing would be visible.

I have the bottom of the rear center skin removed for replacement so now would be a good time to install this.

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Seems to me that this would be better than just using Vulken as the manufacturer did. I may take my poor attempt to my local sheet metal man and see if he might be able to form a better piece.

Any new thoughts on this application?

Am I trying too hard to reinvent the wheel?
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Old 08-06-2008, 12:21 PM   #157
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Hey Vernon, good to see you're still at it.

It seems to me that either Malconium or Zeppelinium (it was one of the "iums") discussed this at great length in a thread, but now I can't find it using the Search function. As I recall, one solution was similar to yours, but there might have been other approaches as well.

Stay cool, it's brutal out there!

-Marcus
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Old 08-06-2008, 01:11 PM   #158
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Hey Vernon, good to see you're still at it............

Stay cool, it's brutal out there!

-Marcus
Hey Marcus,

Yea I am still at it (but at a little slower pace!). Between the 100 deg. temps and tropical storm Eduord I have been doing things that can be moved inside my store. I have cleaned up and put new gaskets on half my windows. Because of the placement of my cover poles I am unable to remove the others at this time. Other than that I have not done much but planning. I do try to do something constructive every day (if I can count reading the forums as being constructive ).

My next project needs to be replacing the corner outside skins but I just can't make myself get out in the heat to drill the old ones out and fit the new ones in. That reflection off the aluminum is a real killer.
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Old 08-06-2008, 01:58 PM   #159
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Originally Posted by vhord View Post
I am still tinkering around for a possible solution to the seepage problems on Airstream tailgates due to ponding. I mentioned this on a previous thread.

This morning I played around with some light guage (.0092") aluminum flashing. I know it looks sort of crude but it gave me hopes that it was at least possible to fabricate some sort of flashing at a curved angle. Even though this attempt has wringles in the metal I think it would still work if worked up underneath the outer skin or attached to the outside with Vulkem.

Attachment 65178

I would then overlay it with another piece of .040 aluminum (represented by the lumber in the following picture) and the rest would be covered by the rub rail. Therefore none of the flashing would be visible.

I have the bottom of the rear center skin removed for replacement so now would be a good time to install this.

Attachment 65179

Seems to me that this would be better than just using Vulken as the manufacturer did. I may take my poor attempt to my local sheet metal man and see if he might be able to form a better piece.

Any new thoughts on this application?

Am I trying too hard to reinvent the wheel?
You are really close. Make two forming blocks from plywood with the curve that you want cut in. Cut a small radius (1/8") on the edge of one piece. Sandwich the aluminum between the the two pieces of plywood making sure that the aluminum is next to the radius on the one sheet amd move the non radius piece of ply away from the other by 1/8", and bolt or clamp it all together. Trim the aluminum off to the height of the flange you want, and file the edge smooth to prevent cracking. Now using a mallet, wooden blocks, etc, roll the aluminum around the flanged piece of plywood. Once the flange is around the corner planish it flat to the edge of the plywood. Use softer aluminum for this as it will not work with tempered aluminum unless annealed.

Kip
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Old 08-06-2008, 02:35 PM   #160
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Make two forming blocks from plywood with the curve that you want cut in. Cut a small radius (1/8") on the edge of one piece. Sandwich the aluminum between the the two pieces of plywood making sure that the aluminum is next to the radius on the one sheet amd move the non radius piece of ply away from the other by 1/8", and bolt or clamp it all together. Trim the aluminum off to the height of the flange you want, and file the edge smooth to prevent cracking. Now using a mallet, wooden blocks, etc, roll the aluminum around the flanged piece of plywood. Once the flange is around the corner planish it flat to the edge of the plywood. Use softer aluminum for this as it will not work with tempered aluminum unless annealed.

Kip
Thanks Kip,

I will give it a try.

That is sort of what I attempted the first time but I will try to do it better on my next attempt. I did not radius to edge which was probably part of my problem and I only had one forming block made (the one in the picture on the tailgate). I used a straight board on the other side but I will cut it also the next time. I can't find any information on the type of aluminum that the flashing is made of. It is thin enough that I hope it will bend without cracking. I only had one small puncture on my first attempt and that was a place that had wrinkled. Also I will need to cut my inside forming board at a slight angle as the rear wall is not perpendicular to the ground and therefore the angle needs to be more than a 90 deg. bend.
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