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Old 01-26-2018, 05:40 PM   #1
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1971 27' Overlander
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Exterior gas lines on belly

I apologize because I know nothing about this in advance, but my AS have the LP lines hanging under the belly. Is this the AS norm or should they be internal? I want to remove the pan to see the water tank and most likely replace it but this requires removing the gas lines, no? Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
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Old 01-26-2018, 05:53 PM   #2
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It is normal to have the propane plumbing outside the belly pan under the trailer. If one of the lines springs a leak, the propane escapes into the air. If the lines were inside the belly pan, a leak could fill the belly pan with propane. Which would be dangerous in a "BOOM!" kind of way.
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Old 01-26-2018, 06:19 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bwhitaker View Post
I apologize because I know nothing about this in advance, but my AS have the LP lines hanging under the belly. Is this the AS norm or should they be internal? I want to remove the pan to see the water tank and most likely replace it but this requires removing the gas lines, no? Any help is appreciated. Thanks!
I believe it is the norm(safety) as gas build-up between the sub-floor and belly pan would be disastrous. L.P. is heavier than air and would stay trapped if enclosed... I replaced all of the rubber hoses and tank regulator and from what I saw, it wouldn't be too difficult to take the hardlines down. You might be able to get away with moving the line out off the way of your tanks after disconnecting your rubber tank supply hose and the hangers... Good luck...
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Old 01-27-2018, 07:13 PM   #4
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External leak = cold gas. Internal leak = potential explosion. External is safer, and the way it's supposed to be installed.
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Old 07-14-2018, 03:08 PM   #5
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Protecting the external copper propane lines

Has anyone felt apprehensive about the exposed copper propane lines?

I added some foam insulation but not sure if Iím just being paranoid.




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Old 07-14-2018, 03:15 PM   #6
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What good would the insulation do?
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Old 07-14-2018, 04:36 PM   #7
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The foam "insulation" is used as a protection for sharp rocks being thrown by the tires against the gas lines. Some people use old garden hose, which is cut like the insulation, and lasts a lot longer. I have used both over the years. If you have to travel a lot of gravel roads it is a good idea to protect the lines. JMHO
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Old 07-15-2018, 05:28 AM   #8
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Originally Posted by CBWELL View Post
The foam "insulation" is used as a protection for sharp rocks being thrown by the tires against the gas lines. Some people use old garden hose, which is cut like the insulation, and lasts a lot longer. I have used both over the years. If you have to travel a lot of gravel roads it is a good idea to protect the lines. JMHO


Didnít think about garden hose! That would work well.

Weíre heading west this week so will see how it holds up.
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Old 07-15-2018, 06:24 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CBWELL View Post
The foam "insulation" is used as a protection for sharp rocks being thrown by the tires against the gas lines. Some people use old garden hose, which is cut like the insulation, and lasts a lot longer. I have used both over the years. If you have to travel a lot of gravel roads it is a good idea to protect the lines. JMHO
New units from the factory use Pex tubing around the copper propane lines.
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Old 07-15-2018, 07:40 AM   #10
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Before we went to Alaska in 2012, I encased all my gas lines in old garden hose held in place with UV resistant zip ties. Iím not sure it was worth the trouble. Others on the trip didnít do it, some who had been many times never did it, nobody had any trouble with damaged lines.
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Old 07-15-2018, 09:26 AM   #11
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Hi

The biggest issue with copper is a rock that collapses the tube. Yes, that's a pretty big rock. The collapse is normally how you get a break / leak. If you are going to "protect" it, you need a covering that is stronger / more rigid than the copper. The various forms of plastic stuff they put around wiring is not going to help much in this case.

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Old 07-15-2018, 09:41 AM   #12
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I did what jrenard Post #5 did. After a couple years the stones pretty well took care of much of the foam insulation. We do a lot of traveling on gravel roads, in comparison to those who do not.

Water is also absorbed into the foam. If traveling on salted roads for winter or along the coasts, salt is corrosive and will 'digest' copper. It remains in the foam after it dries out.

Plastic is best, but installed so water does not enter from the open ends.

What have I done lately with this issue... nothing, but like jrenard... something is better than nothing. Nice job! Mine did not look as professional.

The current trailer I took some gutter galvanized metal that is bent at a right angle, duct taped one end to the bottom of the trailer. Stones will pummel the metal with no ill effects to the copper that is at a right angle to the direction of travel. Does not look professional, but I do not want to use screws into the aluminum skin, either. I could cement the metal to the aluminum skin, but then replacing it would be an additional project.

It need not look pretty, just does the job.

The copper lines that run in the direction of travel, have little exposure to stones.

Protagonist has the best reason. Airstream should be doing more about these exposed copper lines as we all recognize this as a problem... years ago.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:20 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ray Eklund View Post
I did what jrenard Post #5 did. After a couple years the stones pretty well took care of much of the foam insulation. We do a lot of traveling on gravel roads, in comparison to those who do not.

Water is also absorbed into the foam. If traveling on salted roads for winter or along the coasts, salt is corrosive and will 'digest' copper. It remains in the foam after it dries out.

Plastic is best, but installed so water does not enter from the open ends.

What have I done lately with this issue... nothing, but like jrenard... something is better than nothing. Nice job! Mine did not look as professional.

The current trailer I took some gutter galvanized metal that is bent at a right angle, duct taped one end to the bottom of the trailer. Stones will pummel the metal with no ill effects to the copper that is at a right angle to the direction of travel. Does not look professional, but I do not want to use screws into the aluminum skin, either. I could cement the metal to the aluminum skin, but then replacing it would be an additional project.

It need not look pretty, just does the job.

The copper lines that run in the direction of travel, have little exposure to stones.

Protagonist has the best reason. Airstream should be doing more about these exposed copper lines as we all recognize this as a problem... years ago.


I agree... and good point about absorption. We are in New England and salted roads are above and beyond comprehension. Will plan on seeing how this trip plays out (about 4,500 miles).

Now some deflector shields for the drain valves...
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