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Old 06-02-2023, 07:10 AM   #1
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2019 16' Sport
2016 Interstate Grand Tour Ext
Vista , California
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Considering litium batteries for 2016 Interstate

Hi all,

I have a 2016 Interstate 24XGT with stock group 24 AGM batteries and want to have it set up with lithium batteries. Considering a 200 or 400 amp hour set up.

I'm interested in anyone's experience with having this done. I know it will be uber expensive but I'm ready to get it done. Who has had this done recently? Who did it? How much was it? What all needed to be done? Any quick, reliable and trustworthy installers in the Southern California area (San Diego)?

Looking forward to your replies.
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Old 06-05-2023, 03:06 PM   #2
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We did a couple of years ago. 4x100AH Battleborns + other component upgrades. Around $11K.

If you do it, get a large inverter (like 3000 watts) so you can run the microwave or A/C.
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Old 06-05-2023, 10:00 PM   #3
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Considering litium batteries for 2016 Interstate

No idea what it would cost in your area, but given youíre on the west coast, I strongly recommend you reach out to AM Solar in Oregon. They did wonderful work on our Aistream trailer several years ago, and an affiliate of theirs in Naples, FL did the same with our van a couple of years ago. Overall, we couldnít be happier. We got a pair of 200Ah Life Blue lithium batteries, a 3kW Victron inverter, roughly 400 watts of solar with a Victron controller, and a Victron Cyrix battery combiner.
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Old 06-07-2023, 06:14 PM   #4
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Salem , New Hampshire
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There is a lot to consider and many variables.

Space:
First start by figuring out how much space youíre willing to give up in your garage space. The more you give up the more components and batteries that you can put in there. There are many batteries and their footprints vary with Victron being the smallest but the priciest.

Inverter:
What size inverter do you want and what do you want to power. We have a Victron Multiplus 3k and have it wired to run everything in our rig at all times. No need to to guess on what can be ran or not. We can run the the AC, coffee maker and the hot water heater or induction cook top if wanted at the same time when tied to shore power. We eliminated that stupid Precision Circuits hall monitor to allow the power boost function on our Victron inverter. When not tied to shore power, we can run anything up to that 3k mark on the inverter - super convenient. This will usually be two high powered appliances.

AHís
Now this is subjective and you need to figure out how many amp hours you need and what you want to run when not tied to shore power. Personally, I wouldnít go less than 400 Ahís. Our vans do get very hot and youíre going to want to run your AC at times. Folks with trailers usually go to a park and are able to tie into shore power and stay there. B owners for the most part are on the move so the AC is important especially during hot weather. Not an issue if youíre good with running your loud generator. If not, 400 will get you some run time from your batteries to make it comfortable during some stops or bit longer. 600Ahís is better and itís what we have I can get about 6-8 hours with it AC cycling. You can go up from there but the price is going to go up too.

Solar:
Solar panels are great for trickle charging and keeping up with the fridge/freezer and a few items. They will charge your batteries but donít count on solar quickly charging your batteries. You also are going to need a solar charge controller to put that solar energy into your batteries. Many choices out there but some of Victron MPPTís come with Bluetooth and are worth the money. Also consider how many panels you can get up on the roof. We have four 100 watt panels and added a fifth on top of the AC shroud for a total of 500. I canít see you getting more than that on the roof unless you also add a ground solar array. If you do, them you also have to carry those in the limited space that we have and do some additional wiring for those.

DC Charging:
Youíd want that heavy duty Sprinter alternator to do some of the charging to your batteries and you need to decide on which one. You can go with a 30A Victron Orion and can also do two in parallel for a total of 60 amps from your alternator. We have a Victron Buck Boost and get 50 amps to the batteries. However, after our recent trips, Iíve ordered and going to add a second Victron Buck Boost for at total of 100 Amps coming from the alternator. Yup, I know, a touchy subject too many with a bunch of opinions but many have been doing it for years with no issues but please donít listen to me on this one and stick to the 40Aís that Sprinter recommends. Newer vans I believe have higher limits.

If youíre not too familiar with 12v wiring, Iíd strongly recommend paying to get it done as its worth it 100%. I did it myself for around 10k but I enjoy doing it as I want to know every part of my electrical build so that I can troubleshoot any problems. I know that Iím definitely missing bunch of things but at least these are a few item to consider and others can chime in to fill in the gaps.

Lastly, weíre talking about a B Sprinter van and not an Airstream trailer. Two completely different animals.
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Old 06-08-2023, 12:24 AM   #5
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For fitting a lot of power in weird places keep in mind Battleborn Game changer batteries. https://battlebornbatteries.com/why-...n-gamechanger/

Sometimes they can go places no other battery can. Agree on the Victron Multiplus 3000 inverter. If you are putting in Lithium in the 300+ amp hour range a power system like that will make it all seem worthwhile.
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Old 06-08-2023, 08:32 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StogieMan View Post
There is a lot to consider and many variables.

Space:
First start by figuring out how much space youíre willing to give up in your garage space. The more you give up the more components and batteries that you can put in there. There are many batteries and their footprints vary with Victron being the smallest but the priciest.

Inverter:
What size inverter do you want and what do you want to power. We have a Victron Multiplus 3k and have it wired to run everything in our rig at all times. No need to to guess on what can be ran or not. We can run the the AC, coffee maker and the hot water heater or induction cook top if wanted at the same time when tied to shore power. We eliminated that stupid Precision Circuits hall monitor to allow the power boost function on our Victron inverter. When not tied to shore power, we can run anything up to that 3k mark on the inverter - super convenient. This will usually be two high powered appliances.

AHís
Now this is subjective and you need to figure out how many amp hours you need and what you want to run when not tied to shore power. Personally, I wouldnít go less than 400 Ahís. Our vans do get very hot and youíre going to want to run your AC at times. Folks with trailers usually go to a park and are able to tie into shore power and stay there. B owners for the most part are on the move so the AC is important especially during hot weather. Not an issue if youíre good with running your loud generator. If not, 400 will get you some run time from your batteries to make it comfortable during some stops or bit longer. 600Ahís is better and itís what we have I can get about 6-8 hours with it AC cycling. You can go up from there but the price is going to go up too.

Solar:
Solar panels are great for trickle charging and keeping up with the fridge/freezer and a few items. They will charge your batteries but donít count on solar quickly charging your batteries. You also are going to need a solar charge controller to put that solar energy into your batteries. Many choices out there but some of Victron MPPTís come with Bluetooth and are worth the money. Also consider how many panels you can get up on the roof. We have four 100 watt panels and added a fifth on top of the AC shroud for a total of 500. I canít see you getting more than that on the roof unless you also add a ground solar array. If you do, them you also have to carry those in the limited space that we have and do some additional wiring for those.

DC Charging:
Youíd want that heavy duty Sprinter alternator to do some of the charging to your batteries and you need to decide on which one. You can go with a 30A Victron Orion and can also do two in parallel for a total of 60 amps from your alternator. We have a Victron Buck Boost and get 50 amps to the batteries. However, after our recent trips, Iíve ordered and going to add a second Victron Buck Boost for at total of 100 Amps coming from the alternator. Yup, I know, a touchy subject too many with a bunch of opinions but many have been doing it for years with no issues but please donít listen to me on this one and stick to the 40Aís that Sprinter recommends. Newer vans I believe have higher limits.

If youíre not too familiar with 12v wiring, Iíd strongly recommend paying to get it done as its worth it 100%. I did it myself for around 10k but I enjoy doing it as I want to know every part of my electrical build so that I can troubleshoot any problems. I know that Iím definitely missing bunch of things but at least these are a few item to consider and others can chime in to fill in the gaps.

Lastly, weíre talking about a B Sprinter van and not an Airstream trailer. Two completely different animals.

Excellent information!

If you fully understand and can work with AC/DC devices, wiring and wiring diagrams, you certainly can do a DIY installation and save a ton of money, especially if you do your own battery build. The work just has to be done to accepted standards. I fuse and have disconnects on each battery pack and do the same on the feeder line to the inverter. Shore power also goes through a breaker in front of the inverter.

I did a 400AH/3,000W system with all wiring, fuses and other ancillary devices for just a little over 3K plus countless hours of labor (of love) and of course you need tools. Winter lay-off projects.

With a cell-build I could package those to fit where and how I wanted them. So 200AH fit nicely into the existing steel box, another 200AH sits in a purposefully made wooden box just outside the steel box. I can add another 200AH in front of that box for about $750 (cells, BMS, fuse, disconnect system and cables)

I do not disconnect the Precision Circuits Power Control System. Consequently I run only one (heavy) use appliance at anyone time, i.e. AC, Microwave, Coffee Maker. Although each battery has a 200A capable BMS, my voluntary system limit is 150A max. The reason for that is heat buildup.

In my case the inverter is in the same place where I took the old one out, under the rear seat (and that may be a mistake) If temperatures are in the 90's, the running AC with constant high amp draw builds up heat and the inverter can and will show an E07 fault, too much heat. Battery heat also goes up and all that inside your (hot) van which you try to cool down(!?)

So the next project is likely to power vent and thermostat control, the space under the rear seat
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Old 06-08-2023, 09:13 AM   #7
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Vista , California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rocinante View Post
No idea what it would cost in your area, but given youíre on the west coast, I strongly recommend you reach out to AM Solar in Oregon. They did wonderful work on our Aistream trailer several years ago, and an affiliate of theirs in Naples, FL did the same with our van a couple of years ago. Overall, we couldnít be happier. We got a pair of 200Ah Life Blue lithium batteries, a 3kW Victron inverter, roughly 400 watts of solar with a Victron controller, and a Victron Cyrix battery combiner.
I am in the process of checking with a few local RV solar/lithium shops in my area. The system you describe is the same as what I'm looking for
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Old 06-08-2023, 09:17 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daleyocum View Post
For fitting a lot of power in weird places keep in mind Battleborn Game changer batteries. https://battlebornbatteries.com/why-...n-gamechanger/

Sometimes they can go places no other battery can. Agree on the Victron Multiplus 3000 inverter. If you are putting in Lithium in the 300+ amp hour range a power system like that will make it all seem worthwhile.
This is good information. Thanks!
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Old 06-08-2023, 09:20 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StogieMan View Post
There is a lot to consider and many variables.

Space:
First start by figuring out how much space youíre willing to give up in your garage space. The more you give up the more components and batteries that you can put in there. There are many batteries and their footprints vary with Victron being the smallest but the priciest.

Inverter:
What size inverter do you want and what do you want to power. We have a Victron Multiplus 3k and have it wired to run everything in our rig at all times. No need to to guess on what can be ran or not. We can run the the AC, coffee maker and the hot water heater or induction cook top if wanted at the same time when tied to shore power. We eliminated that stupid Precision Circuits hall monitor to allow the power boost function on our Victron inverter. When not tied to shore power, we can run anything up to that 3k mark on the inverter - super convenient. This will usually be two high powered appliances.

AHís
Now this is subjective and you need to figure out how many amp hours you need and what you want to run when not tied to shore power. Personally, I wouldnít go less than 400 Ahís. Our vans do get very hot and youíre going to want to run your AC at times. Folks with trailers usually go to a park and are able to tie into shore power and stay there. B owners for the most part are on the move so the AC is important especially during hot weather. Not an issue if youíre good with running your loud generator. If not, 400 will get you some run time from your batteries to make it comfortable during some stops or bit longer. 600Ahís is better and itís what we have I can get about 6-8 hours with it AC cycling. You can go up from there but the price is going to go up too.

Solar:
Solar panels are great for trickle charging and keeping up with the fridge/freezer and a few items. They will charge your batteries but donít count on solar quickly charging your batteries. You also are going to need a solar charge controller to put that solar energy into your batteries. Many choices out there but some of Victron MPPTís come with Bluetooth and are worth the money. Also consider how many panels you can get up on the roof. We have four 100 watt panels and added a fifth on top of the AC shroud for a total of 500. I canít see you getting more than that on the roof unless you also add a ground solar array. If you do, them you also have to carry those in the limited space that we have and do some additional wiring for those.

DC Charging:
Youíd want that heavy duty Sprinter alternator to do some of the charging to your batteries and you need to decide on which one. You can go with a 30A Victron Orion and can also do two in parallel for a total of 60 amps from your alternator. We have a Victron Buck Boost and get 50 amps to the batteries. However, after our recent trips, Iíve ordered and going to add a second Victron Buck Boost for at total of 100 Amps coming from the alternator. Yup, I know, a touchy subject too many with a bunch of opinions but many have been doing it for years with no issues but please donít listen to me on this one and stick to the 40Aís that Sprinter recommends. Newer vans I believe have higher limits.

If youíre not too familiar with 12v wiring, Iíd strongly recommend paying to get it done as its worth it 100%. I did it myself for around 10k but I enjoy doing it as I want to know every part of my electrical build so that I can troubleshoot any problems. I know that Iím definitely missing bunch of things but at least these are a few item to consider and others can chime in to fill in the gaps.

Lastly, weíre talking about a B Sprinter van and not an Airstream trailer. Two completely different animals.
Wow! That is a very detailed and very very helpful response. It gives me the sort of information that I need as I begin talking with local RV solar/lithium battery installers. I don't suppose there's a chance that I could talk you into doing the job, lol.
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Old 06-08-2023, 09:45 AM   #10
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2015 Interstate Ext. Coach
Columbus , Ohio
Join Date: Sep 2016
Posts: 417
Fwiw

I also posted this on your #@&%( electric fridge thread!
*********************************************

We have a 2015 Ext Lounge that we bought used in Aug of 2016. It had a 100W flex solar panel and stock AGM batteries, solar controller and BIM.

As you all know when boon docking we could barely make it through a night without having to run the generator or the engine to recharge the batteries.

Here is our progression to energy independence and longer periods of dry camping.

************************************************** **************************

March 2018
We replaced the stock 12v AGM batteries with two 6V with 224 amp hours ($750). That increased our available usage almost 30%. To charge our new coach batteries we bought a 200W portable Zamp solar suitcase( $850).

May 2019
We added a Goal Zero 1400 Lithium power station ( $1350) which allows us to run our refrigerator, electric articulating twins beds and other 110v appliances in the evenings or when there is no sunshine. We can recharge the GZ with the solar suitcase if stationary or if driving we have a charger that plugs into a powered 12v outlet. The GZ we bought at REI during their 20% off members sale.

August 2019
Next we replaced the stock Battery Isolation Manager (BIM) with a Blue Sea 7622 ($217).
This controller allows the batteries to be fully charged by the vans alternator or solar panels .

Nov 2019
We finally added 300W fixed solar panels to our roof and upgraded to a MPPT solar controller ($4000).

With these improvements, we now can boondock/dry camp until our water resources are used up. That typically ranges from 3-4 days but we have gone 7 days without replenishing our water supply or dumping!

Upgrade costs;

6v batteries - $ 750
Zamp Solar suitcase - $ 850
Blue Sea BIM - $ 217
Goal Zero 1400
Lithium ps $1350
Fixed solar panels
& MPPT controller - $ 4000

Total $ 7167
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Old 06-09-2023, 06:28 AM   #11
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2015 Interstate Grand Tour
Salem , New Hampshire
Join Date: Jun 2022
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You’re welcome Airlock and good luck. Very good ideas and approaches from others that chimed in.

A few more things to add and clarify.

The additional solar panel that I put on top of the AC shroud is a flex panel that I kinda contoured on top of the shroud and not a regular rigid panel. These flex ones have a life span on them for the most part and will need replacing probably around the same time that I have to replace the AC.

You have many alternator charging option besides the Victron Buck Boost and Orions that I mentioned. I’m just a Victron fan boy but their products are top of the line.

A second alternator is another option but in my opinion are for the bigger battery banks north of 600Ah’s to get them charged up quickly. This is the reason that I’m putting in a second 50A Victron Buck Boost. I thought about the second alternator and priced out the installation from MB Sprinter shop. However, I’ve been on the fence on adding a third 300Ah Low Temp LifeBlue battery and if I do, then I’m definitely getting the second alternator.

The shop will also price out other components needed depending on the build like a Smart Battery Shunt, BMS (battery management system) if the batteries you choose do not have built in one, battery heaters, cables, fuses etc.

Below is a good video for a basic understanding of how an AC/DC basic lithium setup works and some of the components that you’ll need. Again, you don’t need to use Victron components as there are many products out there to choose from.


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Old 06-09-2023, 08:46 AM   #12
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2019 16' Sport
2016 Interstate Grand Tour Ext
Vista , California
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 174
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rig Rat View Post
I also posted this on your #@&%( electric fridge thread!
*********************************************

We have a 2015 Ext Lounge that we bought used in Aug of 2016. It had a 100W flex solar panel and stock AGM batteries, solar controller and BIM.

As you all know when boon docking we could barely make it through a night without having to run the generator or the engine to recharge the batteries.

Here is our progression to energy independence and longer periods of dry camping.

************************************************** **************************

March 2018
We replaced the stock 12v AGM batteries with two 6V with 224 amp hours ($750). That increased our available usage almost 30%. To charge our new coach batteries we bought a 200W portable Zamp solar suitcase( $850).

May 2019
We added a Goal Zero 1400 Lithium power station ( $1350) which allows us to run our refrigerator, electric articulating twins beds and other 110v appliances in the evenings or when there is no sunshine. We can recharge the GZ with the solar suitcase if stationary or if driving we have a charger that plugs into a powered 12v outlet. The GZ we bought at REI during their 20% off members sale.

August 2019
Next we replaced the stock Battery Isolation Manager (BIM) with a Blue Sea 7622 ($217).
This controller allows the batteries to be fully charged by the vans alternator or solar panels .

Nov 2019
We finally added 300W fixed solar panels to our roof and upgraded to a MPPT solar controller ($4000).

With these improvements, we now can boondock/dry camp until our water resources are used up. That typically ranges from 3-4 days but we have gone 7 days without replenishing our water supply or dumping!

Upgrade costs;

6v batteries - $ 750
Zamp Solar suitcase - $ 850
Blue Sea BIM - $ 217
Goal Zero 1400
Lithium ps $1350
Fixed solar panels
& MPPT controller - $ 4000

Total $ 7167
Rig Rat,

thanks for the very useful information on your power needs progression. A couple of questions:

1. Did the 2-6volt arm batteries fit where the old one were located or did you need to fabricate a new holder for them?
2. How did you connect your portable solar panels to charge the batteries? My 2019 Bambi had a plug in port on the frame, but the 2016 Interstates do not have such a plug and play option.

Thanks
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Old 06-09-2023, 09:08 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StogieMan View Post

A second alternator is another option but in my opinion are for the bigger battery banks north of 600Ahís to get them charged up quickly. This is the reason that Iím putting in a second 50A Victron Buck Boost. I thought about the second alternator and priced out the installation from MB Sprinter shop. However, Iíve been on the fence on adding a third 300Ah Low Temp LifeBlue battery and if I do, then Iím definitely getting the second alternator.
So everyone is aware, stock alternators may be rated at what seems like a crazy number amps just waiting to be tapped but they will be very unhappy delivering those for long. I wouldnít draw more than 30 amps or so from most of them on an ongoing basis. This Long Long Honeymoon video is an entertaining cautionary tale. https://youtu.be/KTGDCSu1kwI
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Old 06-09-2023, 10:16 AM   #14
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Columbus , Ohio
Join Date: Sep 2016
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thanks for the very useful information on your power needs progression. A couple of questions:

1. Did the 2-6volt arm batteries fit where the old one were located or did you need to fabricate a new holder for them?

***Yes they fit inside of the battery box that is under our sofa. Just had to put a thin piece of wood over the top of the terminals to keep them from contacting & shorting out on the metal top.


2. How did you connect your portable solar panels to charge the batteries? My 2019 Bambi had a plug in port on the frame, but the 2016 Interstates do not have such a plug and play option.

***Our 2015 has a battery vent which we used to run a cord/port to attach to the solar panels.
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Old 06-09-2023, 01:34 PM   #15
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2016 Interstate Grand Tour Ext
Vista , California
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rig Rat View Post
thanks for the very useful information on your power needs progression. A couple of questions:

1. Did the 2-6volt arm batteries fit where the old one were located or did you need to fabricate a new holder for them?

***Yes they fit inside of the battery box that is under our sofa. Just had to put a thin piece of wood over the top of the terminals to keep them from contacting & shorting out on the metal top.


2. How did you connect your portable solar panels to charge the batteries? My 2019 Bambi had a plug in port on the frame, but the 2016 Interstates do not have such a plug and play option.

***Our 2015 has a battery vent which we used to run a cord/port to attach to the solar panels.
Thanks for the details. And it looks like you were able to make good use of your battery location as well as the vent to be able to charge them with portable solar. Unfortunately, our batteries are located in a cage underneath the AI in back of the rear axle. Guess I'll have to take a look at that and get some measurements to see if I can install 2-6V agms in the same cage as the stock batteries (2-12Group24 agms.
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Old 06-09-2023, 03:29 PM   #16
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Columbus , Ohio
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Guess I'll have to take a look at that and get some measurements to see if I can install 2-6V agms in the same cage as the stock batteries (2-12Group24 agms.[/QUOTE]
****************************

The DC224-6 batteries fit into my existing battery box;

https://fullriverbattery.com/battery-series/dc-series/

And it looks like you were able to make good use of your battery location as well as the vent to be able to charge them with portable solar. Unfortunately, our batteries are located in a cage underneath the AI in back of the rear axle

****FWIW, you might be able to run a charging cord to your batteries and zip tie the connector end to the frame near the hitch. That way you could use a portable solar set up to charge your house batteries!
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Old 06-09-2023, 09:43 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Airlock View Post
Thanks for the details. And it looks like you were able to make good use of your battery location as well as the vent to be able to charge them with portable solar. Unfortunately, our batteries are located in a cage underneath the AI in back of the rear axle. Guess I'll have to take a look at that and get some measurements to see if I can install 2-6V agms in the same cage as the stock batteries (2-12Group24 agms.
Not to be a Debbie downer as the boss lady always tells me that I am but since you’re considering a complete overhaul, this is your chance to plan ahead to avoid redoing things and save some money in the process. If you’re looking to do a second solar ground array, you need to plan ahead for this. If you’re going to be mixing solar panels and if they’re not close in specs you may be doing yourself some harm. Do some research on this as it's too much to get into and why this is not a good idea. One panel that is close in specs is fine but a few may actually work against you. When you're using different solar panels in specs, your best bet will be to use a second solar charge controller. Actually, if it was me, I would definitely be using two separate solar charge controllers and separate the two as it will give you more flexibility. If you’re going to use all the same solar panels, then you’re good with one solar charge controller. However, by having two solar charge controllers, you can use what ever solar panels you want to use for your ground solar array. I agree with RigRat on making the connection somewhere near the hitch and this is what I would do as well.

RigRat and I both have the same year and I have our stock batteries underneath the coach as you. I think that Airstream made the change mid year.
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Old 06-09-2023, 09:45 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by daleyocum View Post
So everyone is aware, stock alternators may be rated at what seems like a crazy number amps just waiting to be tapped but they will be very unhappy delivering those for long. I wouldn’t draw more than 30 amps or so from most of them on an ongoing basis. This Long Long Honeymoon video is an entertaining cautionary tale. https://youtu.be/KTGDCSu1kwI
Yup, I was careful in choosing my words as I knew this would draw some reaction and the reasons that I mentioned a few disclaimers in my posts. There are also a lot of variables that you need to consider including how you’re wiring things, cable thickness, DC charger used etc. just to name a few. Victron Buck Boosts are fully programable so that you can input a lot into them and the reason that they are pricey.

From my posts above and so that I didn’t mislead anyone into jumping into the deep end of the pool:

1. “Lastly, we’re talking about a B Sprinter van and not an Airstream trailer. Two completely different animals.”
2. “Yup, I know, a touchy subject to many with a bunch of opinions but many have been doing it for years with no issues but please don’t listen to me on this one and stick to the 40A’s that Sprinter recommends. Newer vans I believe have higher limits.”

Airstream has been tapping into the Sprinter van alternators as a charging source for years now and continues to do so. This is actually a standard in the Sprinter van build world. You can order a Sprinter van with an auxiliary battery that is rated for a max of 100amps. We have the aux battery that came with our AIGT that powers a 12v socket under the drivers seat. Actually, we’re looking to remove it to add a compressor in its place under the hood. There are passionate arguments made on both the pro and con side of this argument and in the end we’ll just probably agree to disagree. As for me, I’m comfortable trying to get some extra amps off our alternator. I’m actually in the process of adding the second Victron Buck Boost for a total of 100 amps from the alternator as we speak. I will also be the first one to post a thread if it all goes wrong so that other folks don’t make the same mistake as me.
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Old 06-14-2023, 10:14 AM   #19
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San diego quote

Quote:
Originally Posted by Airlock View Post
Hi all,

I have a 2016 Interstate 24XGT with stock group 24 AGM batteries and want to have it set up with lithium batteries. Considering a 200 or 400 amp hour set up.

I'm interested in anyone's experience with having this done. I know it will be uber expensive but I'm ready to get it done. Who has had this done recently? Who did it? How much was it? What all needed to be done? Any quick, reliable and trustworthy installers in the Southern California area (San Diego)?

Looking forward to your replies.
Received a quote for same setup you are looking at from Infinite RV & Marine 760-798-3939 located in San Diego. My quote of $8000 400 amp 3000 watt is for 25ft Airstream trailer so yours will be different. Seemed to be a fair quote but they do charge up front $200 for the quote. Not sure if that gets knocked off the price. I had to postpone installation due to family stuff. I did get other quotes and they were all over the board depending on batteries, parts, labor hours, mobile vs shop, etc. This company does a lot of boats so is moble.
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Old 06-14-2023, 11:11 AM   #20
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2016 Interstate Grand Tour Ext
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Powayegg View Post
Received a quote for same setup you are looking at from Infinite RV & Marine 760-798-3939 located in San Diego. My quote of $8000 400 amp 3000 watt is for 25ft Airstream trailer so yours will be different. Seemed to be a fair quote but they do charge up front $200 for the quote. Not sure if that gets knocked off the price. I had to postpone installation due to family stuff. I did get other quotes and they were all over the board depending on batteries, parts, labor hours, mobile vs shop, etc. This company does a lot of boats so is moble.
Great info, thanks. I will definitely look into this.
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