Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 07-03-2020, 06:17 PM   #1
New Member
 
Birmingham , Alabama
Join Date: Oct 2019
Posts: 4
Advice needed from Tundra Owners

I have a 2018 Tundra that is rated at 10K towing - 1000 tongue weight. I am considering purchasing a new 30 foot Classic - 7788 base weight. Have you had any issues towing an Airstream with your Tundra and if so - what is the size of the camper. What type of hitch would you recommend?

I know that a 3/4 ton truck would pull better , but hate to upgrade if it is not necessary - trying to get an idea of what to expect when towing it. The 3/4 ton just does not ride as well for day to day driving.

Any advice you may have would be welcomed.
__________________

Lovecamping is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2020, 06:44 PM   #2
4 Rivet Member
 
2019 27' International
Western , North Carolina
Join Date: Jun 2019
Posts: 327
Images: 1
Look at base hitch weight. 886 from what I can see so probably 1000-1200 loaded. That’s over your payload right there. Not counting people and stuff.
__________________

__________________
2019 International Serenity 27 FBQ “TC Escape”

2019 Ford F-350 Platinum
JonDNC is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2020, 07:45 PM   #3
Rivet Master
 
Iansk's Avatar
 
1977 31' Sovereign
Vintage Kin Owner
Vintage Kin Owner
Sunset Valley , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2016
Posts: 683
Hey there,

First off, you have opened a can of worms with a truck/tv question so be prepared.

I own a Tundra (2014, full tow package etc...) and the tongue weight is rated for 1200lbs.

I tow a lot of different trailers with it, it is a capable 1/2 ton truck in pulling and stopping. It gets horrible gas mileage though as you probably already know. I just got 12mpgs towing my 7,000 lb Avion and I was ecstatic. The tundra, as with most 1/2 tons is a compromise. You’ll give up payload for a more reasonable daily driver for instance.

But to answer one of your questions, yes it’s capable. It’s a fantastic truck and so very reliable. If I were full timing however, I’d definitely step up in size.

Your other question about WD hitches is another hot button item here, you’ll get lots of opinions. I have a simple husky or curt system that works just fine for me.

Bottom line is that you’ll have to dig through the noise and form your own conclusions. If you plan on lots of long trips through mountain passes and you have deep pockets, get the biggest truck that makes sense to you and a $2,000 hitch system. It’s a proven rig for sure. You can also just tow with your existing truck, but please be responsible about it, know your weights and most importantly, your limitations. Both personal and mechanical.

Ian
Iansk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2020, 07:49 PM   #4
Rivet Master

 
2019 25' Flying Cloud
Hendersonville , North Carolina
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 630
30' Airstream = 3/4 ton truck

Hook up the 30 footer to your Tundra and give it a try. First stop should be the closest Cat Scale. Do a 3 pass weigh in. Make sure your fully loaded for regular travel. That will probably be enough to convince you that "Your Gonna Need a Bigger Truck". If that doesn't do it find a long steep 9% grade and a long steep 9% descent and that should do it. Throw in a couple of tight switchback curves just for good measure.

Seriously, Your going to be a whole lot more relaxed and have a safer drive with a properly equipped 3/4 ton truck or van (Chevy Express/GMC Savana 2500 or 3500 passenger van with the new 6.2 engine).

You do not have to go overboard with a diesel. Ford has the new 7.3 gasser and the 3/4 ton Silverado with the 6.2 gasser would get the job done without the huge upfront cost of the diesel and higher maintenance cost. A Ram 3/4 with the 6.4 Hemi would be a fine choice also. Happy hunting for your new tow vehicle.
uraljohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2020, 08:00 PM   #5
Rivet Master

 
2019 25' Flying Cloud
Hendersonville , North Carolina
Join Date: Aug 2017
Posts: 630
Tow vehicle for a 30' AS

One thing to keep in mind. If you do step up to a better tow vehicle, the higher the trim level, the lower the payload rating. Ford XL/XLT has more payload than Lariat/King Ranch/Platinum. Regular Silverado better than GMC Denali.
Same with Ram. Less options and junk added on means higher payload.

Always look at the driver door jamb for the stickers giving you the Payload and Front/Rear Axle weight figures.

Your Tundra, while it is a very fine, reliable truck suffers from a rather low payload rating. Just the way it is. Again, happy hunting for that new properly equipped tow vehicle.
uraljohn is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2020, 09:52 PM   #6
Rivet Master
 
TheGreatleys's Avatar
 
1974 27' Overlander
Baltimore , Maryland
Join Date: Mar 2016
Posts: 1,024
Quote:
Originally Posted by JonDNC View Post
Look at base hitch weight. 886 from what I can see so probably 1000-1200 loaded. That’s over your payload right there. Not counting people and stuff.
You seem to be conflating the tongue weight rating of the hitch with the payload rating of the truck. The payload of a 2018 Tundra is between 1,440 and 1,730 lbs, depending on the model.

OP, if dry tongue weight of the Airstream is 886 lbs, you're definitely going to be cutting it close to the 1,000 lb rating of your hitch, but won't necessarily be over. And Curt makes a pretty beefy class V aftermarket hitch for the Tundra with a tongue weight rating of 2,400 lbs. Won't help you with payload, but might be cheaper than buying a new truck if you're just over on tongue weight but fine on the axles.

You're going to be close to your axles' design limits, so you're not going to be able to bring much heavy stuff along with you in the truck bed. This may or may not be a problem depending on your camping style.

The stock rear leaf springs on the Tundra are pretty soft. If you're carrying near your limits, you will likely want to upgrade to a heavy duty set, or add a helper spring.

I tow my 27' with a 2010 Tundra and a ProPride hitch. Others do fine with cheaper hitch systems, but I think a PPP hitch is worth the price of admission when you're towing near your truck's design limits. $2,000 seems like a lot for a hitch, but compared to the cost of moving to a 3/4 ton, it's likely to be the lower cost option.

Towing near design limits has its drawbacks, but can be done safely. Steep mountain passes are more challenging, but with some care and planning, you can easily get where you want to go. As with anything, your truck and hitch system is going to be a compromise among your various needs: budget, the design limits of your equipment, your camping style, and your personal preferences.
TheGreatleys is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-03-2020, 09:56 PM   #7
2 Rivet Member
 
Ron Glow's Avatar
 
2018 27' Flying Cloud
Haubstadt , Indiana
Join Date: May 2018
Posts: 25
Images: 3
Tundra Towing

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovecamping View Post
I have a 2018 Tundra that is rated at 10K towing - 1000 tongue weight. I am considering purchasing a new 30 foot Classic - 7788 base weight. Have you had any issues towing an Airstream with your Tundra and if so - what is the size of the camper. What type of hitch would you recommend?

I know that a 3/4 ton truck would pull better , but hate to upgrade if it is not necessary - trying to get an idea of what to expect when towing it. The 3/4 ton just does not ride as well for day to day driving.

Any advice you may have would be welcomed.
I use a 2016 Tundra double cab to pull a 2018 Flying Cloud 27FB. I use an Equalizer hitch and enjoy the towing experience. I added Sumo springs in back and also added the plastic pads under the Equalizer bars. I keep it greased as recommended and it is silent. I have never had any sway or white knuckle experiences so far. We live in Indiana and have pulled out to Phoenix a few times and surrounding area. I take it easy on speed. It is my daily driver as well. I have seen mileage from 9 to 12 pulling and around 17 empty. So far, I have no desire for a heavier truck.
Ron Glow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 04:47 AM   #8
4 Rivet Member
 
2015 30' International
FREDERICK , Maryland
Join Date: Jan 2014
Posts: 367
Yes, the Tundra will pull your trailer, but will it be overloaded - at or over capacity? You can always try see how it goes and upgrade your truck later. I used to tow my 30' International with a Tundra, until I had a couple of white knuckle experiences coming down some steep mountain grades, also my mpg dropped down to around 8 mpg in the mountains. I upgraded to a F-250 diesel and now towing is a pleasure, up or down mountains, whatever. I sometimes forget the trailer is back there. Yes a diesel is a much bigger cost upfront, greater cost on upkeep and maintenance (DEF, oil & fuel filters, price of diesel, etc.), but piece of mind and comfort is worth a lot to me.
Doc Foster is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 06:03 AM   #9
3 Rivet Member
 
malinois38's Avatar
 
2008 28' International
Happy Valley , Pennsylvania
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 245
Tundra

I tow a 28” International with my 2008 Crewmax. Combo weighs in a tad over 14K, about 7K for each TV and AS. Tongue weight is 960lbs after a recent upgrade to 6v batteries. I use “E” rated tires, Bilstein shocks and added a rear sway bar(best upgrade so far). Been to the CAT scales several times to get dialed in & I am under axle ratings. I use a Reese Straight Line hitch & get no sway or push from big rigs.
The truck is very dependable at 174K mileage. Towing is 9-10mpg range with a 26 gallon tank. I would not want to pull a bigger/heavier trailer with this set up. If you stay in Alabama, I say your good. If you plan on traveling out west, I would upgrade or wait and see the specs on the 2022 Tundra

Also, avoid any 10% grade at 10,000’ above sea level with switchbacks. I made it, but never again...Teton Pass
malinois38 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 08:27 AM   #10
4 Rivet Member
 
brokeboater's Avatar
 
2003 25' Safari
High Springs , Florida
Join Date: Jul 2006
Posts: 323
Since this is a truck thread and people are liberally throwing in their opinions, I'll toss mine out there.

I currently tow with a one ton diesel but have been shopping for a newer truck. I'm at 220K miles and want to make another run to Alaska. I don't think I can part with the old diesel as those have been mighty nice miles but I might buy a new truck for the Alaska trip and keep the old timer too. For me the choice is down to a Tundra. I think I would be fine as I run a little lean, traveling alone and a simple life style. Yet I do feel the cargo capacity would be severely restricting. Safari 25s have a fairly substantial tongue weight, then throw in a cap and some tools and supplies and suddenly you are right there. I'd suggest you, like I am going to do, is wait to see what the 2022 Tundra has to offer. Hopefully a V-6 turbo with decent mpg rating and a little better cargo capacity. If it's not up to what I want then I'll probably grab a 5.7 leftover and make do for the trip. For you, if it's not substantially improved cargo wise, I'd have to take a hard look at a Ford F250 gas.
__________________
“While you live, shine / Have no grief at all / Life exists only for a short while / And time demands its toll.”
brokeboater is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 09:04 AM   #11
Rivet Master
 
Ray Eklund's Avatar
 
2019 27' International
2014 25' International
2006 23' Safari SE
Fort Saunders , Wyoming
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 3,983
Tundra. Reliable. Excellent pickup. Too light for a 27'+

I have owned Toyota pickups since 1981 and Land Cruisers since 1985. The early models were not like the current models. Rusted out metal of the 1981 mini pickup, even you kept care of it. The Cruisers all held up fine.

Used with 150,000 to 200,000 miles... buyers lined up to buy the Land Cruisers. Not the pickups from those 'small model days'. They were worn out and beaters.

The early full sized Land Cruisers with six cylinder engines... durable truck, lousy engines.

Then came the GREAT Toyota pickups and Land Cruisers with V8's. Toyota came into the USA market and kicked Azzes. I would not tow an Airstream trailer with a Land Cruiser. A heavy truck and the suspension may be fine for single axle lighter trailers, but 23 foot and longer... I would be very cautious. The engine and transmission can handle it... the suspension is not designed for towing BIG stuff.

The Tundra 5.7L is excellent towing 23 foot, marginal for a 25 foot and any Airstream over 25 feet. Used the Tundra towing 23 and 25 foot for years. Been there, done it and that is my experience.

My first non Toyota vehicle since 1981 is my current 2016 F350 King Ranch 4x4 six foot bed DIESEL. A gasoline model would be just as good, but the Diesel in the Rocky Mountains works best for ME. You could go either way. Diesel is a bit of overkill for you in my opinion not towing to high elevations and steep grades up and down mountain passes.

Still use our 2008 Land Cruiser as a daily driver. It is a keeper as Land Cruisers are no longer being built.

Look at the Tundra's leaf springs. Count them and look at the thickness of the springs. Look at a 3/4 or 1 ton Dodge and Ford leaf springs. They are built for your longer trailer in weight and towing. No comparison.

The Toyota doors seal much better than my F350. The Tundra is built better than my F350. It is an excellent truck. It has its limits. After I clean my F350... it is beautiful, not one problem after 49,800 miles driving and many of these miles towing without hesitation.

NON of my Tundra's have mechanical problems. It was from knowing that the Tundra is a great 'light truck' for lighter towing... I had to go to a 3/4 ton or 1 ton tow vehicle with the current 27 foot International. I would do it again when it is time to sell my current 2016 F350 diesel.

Those who are happy, happy with their Tundra, adding whatever to hold the leaf springs from being flat or bent downward... great. Do it. Myself... make ONE mistake in the Rockies in the kind of traveling I do... and you have a truck and an Airstream rolled into a ditch.

In the flat terrain... Tundra will get your trailer moved. But once you get on some Passes in Colorado, your brakes beginning to smell... you will understand why I changed.

I use an Equalizer Hitch, 1,000# bars and Whhoooo Weeee. Great setup!

Anyone who says you will beat your Airstream apart with a 3/4 ton or 1 ton truck... Beat What to Death? A popped rivet can occur with any tow vehicle. So what?

Rolled over in a Ditch needs more than a rivet.
__________________
Human Bean
Ray Eklund is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 09:37 AM   #12
2 Rivet Member
 
2019 25' Flying Cloud
Pala , California
Join Date: Jun 2020
Posts: 93
Hi,

May I suggest you take this over to the Tundra forum as there are a few guys who are expert at towing with Tundras and you'll get some spot on analysis. They usually reply quick too! Look for posts by ColoradoTJ.

https://www.tundras.com/forums/3rd-gen-tundras-2014.27/

I'm hauling a Flying Cloud 25FB with a 5.7L Tundra. it does fine but I feel I'm close to capacity... I towed a Sport 22FB and that was like not even there. Don't get me wrong! I'm doing fine but I don't think I'd want to take on more.

So much is in the set up. With proper hitch and physical weight distribution you may be able to make it work! I'm trying to get to an Escapees Smart Weigh which Is better than the Cat Scales as they measure each wheel and are expert at setting up rigs. Search them out and you may find one nearby.

Good luck!

Trav
TravisH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 10:08 AM   #13
1 Rivet Member
 
2016 30' Classic
Glenwood Springs , Colorado
Join Date: Mar 2015
Posts: 12
Smile You will be safer to go bigger.

I towed my 2016 Classic with a 2012 Tundra when I bought the Classic. Like others have said I was always searching for fuel. The Tundra will pull the Classic but you cannot carry anything else. I traded for a Ram 2500 diesel. I feel so much safer towing in the Ram. The exhaust brake is a dream going down inclines. I loved my Tundra for it's reliability. However I wouldn't go back.
rstull12 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 10:19 AM   #14
Silver Star
 
rucos's Avatar
 
1970 23' Safari
Victoria , British Columbia
Join Date: Apr 2014
Posts: 264
I tow a vintage 23ft with a 2010 tundra 5.7 limited and its a dream to haul ...but I would be looking at a larger truck if I was moving up to 30ft. If your trips are mostly a week or 2 or weekends away, and not hauling long distances thru the mountains it may work out ok.
If you plan on some major long trips I would rethink it.
I hauled my trailer the first year I had it from Canada to the Mexican border and back with a 6cyl 4rnnr and it was ok .....but it convinced me that I needed to move up to a Tundra as I planned on doing more of this kind of travel.
I probably wouldn't go much over 25-27ft with my Tundra and our style of travel.
Have fun and stay safe.
rucos is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 10:26 AM   #15
2 Rivet Member
 
John & Roberta's Avatar
 
2018 30' Flying Cloud
Cameron Park , California
Join Date: Sep 2019
Posts: 20
I have a new tundra (5.7L) with tow package. That was a decision I made after 25 years of small Toyota driving in construction. Knowing I was going to purchase a one- or two-year old Flying Cloud, either 28-foot or 30 (the "30" is actually 30'-11"), I asked around before settling on the truck. Along the way I met a few heavy haulers (cowboys) who told me the Tundra would handle my towing needs, but DRIVE SMART.

In preparation for a two-year trip around the United States, my wife and I set out on what we in the Navy call a Shakedown Cruise, including most of the mountains of the West. Departing Payson AZ, where we bought our one-year-old "Cloud," we faced 28+ miles of 6% down-grade, our first school call. I'd been advised, don't depend fully on breaks, don't depend fully on transmission—work them back and forth and in tandem and keep it slow. We did, and did just fine. (By slow, I never drive over 60, and in the downhills, 45-50 is the limit. Well, Payson, though a long downhill, was no real challenge, not as compared to dropping down into Summit County CO—out or the Eisenhower Tunnel—which was 4.5 miles of 8.5% downgrade. Smelled brakes at the bottom. Left me quite concerned. Realized I'd allowed myself to be pushed by fellow drivers on my side of the road.

We read ahead as to routes, grades, lanes, tight turns (think the route from Montrose CO to Silverton and Durango—NOT).

Where a 3/4-ton has it all over a 1/2-ton like the Tundra is Highway 40. Towing a trailer, we're forced to use the rolly-polly right lane. Most days, one can expect quartering winds (in the Southwest), and most days—even Sunday—one can expect a freight train of semis passing in the fast lane ten-to-fifteen miles faster than my max of 60. The air blast these semis deliver first pushes Airstream stern toward the shoulder, then works the hitch (Blue Ox in our case), then lays a breaking wave on the Tundra. Thank God I mastered 40-foot surfing waves as a kid. (Kidding)

Damn right, drive smart. We'll make it just fine in flatter country, which is what most of what we'll be doing in the months and year or two ahead. If Toyota offers a 3/4-ton along the way, I just may take a test drive.
John & Roberta is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 10:35 AM   #16
2 Rivet Member
 
2015 25' Flying Cloud
Tucson , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2019
Posts: 22
I tow a 25FB with a 2016 Tundra Crew Cab w/ the 5.7. The truck is great and pulls our Airstream all over the southwest without any issues. BUT. The payload capacity leaves a lot to be desired. 1200 pounds vanishes rather quickly when you are packing up for a trip. We use a BlueOx hitch and have no complaints. Please let us know what you end up deciding on. I know I'll be following along. Best of luck in making the decision that's right for you!
McStreamy_ is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 10:51 AM   #17
Retired Navy Veteran
 
1964 26' Overlander
1989 34' Excella
Warner Robins , Georgia
Join Date: Jul 2017
Posts: 108
This if from a loyal Toyota owner, several Camry’s and 4Runner. I desperately wanted the reliability and durability, tow mirrors and poor gas mileage linked to towing With a Tundra and could not find it.

What I found: 1. my brothers 4x4 crew max with a topper had a cargo/payload capacity just over 1100 pounds.
2. Dealers had no inventory with cargo capacity over 1250.

IF you value durability and reliability over towing safety, get the Tundra, put a topper on it fill it with BBQ chairs tools, generators, etc. > 500 lbs, add in driver and pax, which is about 300 lbs for driver & pax, more with folks in the back seat.

Then do the math (example only): 1400 lb cargo capacity - 300 lb pax - 200 lb topper - 1000 tongue weight - 500 lbs cargo = 600 lbs OVER payload.

For the safety of you and those driving around you consider the additional challenges for weight specs: 1. Gross Combined Vehicle Weight (truck + trailer)
2. Rear axle rating.

Your 30 foot option is clearly well over your cargo capacity and we should all discourage you from attempting to tow a 30 foot trailer of any kind!

Check out not only the tundra forums, but TFL truck and Big Truck/Big RV YouTube videos. They test and review all sorts of tow vehicles. They have recommend anything over about 27’ to be safely towed by a 3/4 ton truck.

For all the Tundra posters, please start out with two weights for your truck: 1. Payload, and 2. GCVW rating AND your current weights for traveling

Everyone knows you don’t expect great MPG while towing AND that Tundra’s are durable and reliable! What I read is a reluctance to provide the above payloads and GCVW rating (for obvious reasons). Most folks using Tundra’s for anything larger than a 25’ AS are over on one or both of cargo, and GCWR.

Hopefully, this inspires transparency in communicating on this forum?

My towing story: towed a 26’ AS from Georgia to Seattle in 2018 without any problems, even tho we were over on cargo, and writhing GCVWR, but it was a white knuckle experience. Ordered a 3/4 ton gasser that has over 3,500 lb cargo (happy to have a 34 gl tank) rating (10,000 lb gross vehicle weight - 6,500 weight of truck), just completed 5,000 mile RT Georgia to Colorado, and could not be happier! No white knuckle driving, wife Finally participated for HOURS at a time, and MPG was about the same as the half ton, but greater range based on a larger tank. Several days included over 400 miles, which at 65MPH seems to take forever, plus final day from Little Rock, AR to middle Georgia @ 574 miles. I could not have done that without assist from my wife!

Do some more homework and keep safety and towing within manufacturer’s specs at the top of your priorities!
superChop is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 11:22 AM   #18
Rivet Master
 
Mollysdad's Avatar

 
2017 26' Flying Cloud
Tampa , Florida
Join Date: Feb 2017
Posts: 4,814
Blog Entries: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovecamping View Post
I have a 2018 Tundra that is rated at 10K towing - 1000 tongue weight. I am considering purchasing a new 30 foot Classic - 7788 base weight. Have you had any issues towing an Airstream with your Tundra and if so - what is the size of the camper. What type of hitch would you recommend?

I know that a 3/4 ton truck would pull better , but hate to upgrade if it is not necessary - trying to get an idea of what to expect when towing it. The 3/4 ton just does not ride as well for day to day driving.

Any advice you may have would be welcomed.
I have a 2015 Tundra towing a 26' Airstream and most times I don't know it's there.
The only compromise is you'll reach the payload limit pretty quick. My Tundra is the SR with double cab (not crew cab) and a 6.5' bed. No leather, all done to keep the weight down. I have a fiberglass tonneau from Leer, and I carry a lot of stuff in the bed including a 3000 w. generator. (thus the locking tonneau).
The 26' has a heavy tongue weight, over 900#.
I use an Equalizer hitch, 1000/10,000, and I'm still fine tuning it, but it tows perfectly.

I've driven 650 mile days when returning home, and I've never had this "white knuckle" experience people speak of. Put it in "Tow/Haul" and drive!

I contend that "payload" is a fluid number because the engineers don't know if you're carrying a 1000# trailer tongue with a WD hitch, or 1000# of rocks in the bed. The WD hitch takes some of those "rocks" and moves them to the front axle and the trailer axles.
I agree, I don't want to drive a 3/4 ton to the grocery store, or anywhere else.

Since you already have the Tundra, you know the fuel mileage won't win any awards. I reset the mileage for every trip and towing I get 11.9 mpg. It really doesn't seem to matter if it's hilly or if I'm on cruise control or not. It is better FASTER! If I drove 75 it could be 12.5, but I don't feel comfortable so I stick to 63 mph.
Mollysdad is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 11:44 AM   #19
New Member
 
2005 30' Classic
Escondido , California
Join Date: Oct 2008
Posts: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovecamping View Post
I have a 2018 Tundra that is rated at 10K towing - 1000 tongue weight. I am considering purchasing a new 30 foot Classic - 7788 base weight. Have you had any issues towing an Airstream with your Tundra and if so - what is the size of the camper. What type of hitch would you recommend?

I know that a 3/4 ton truck would pull better , but hate to upgrade if it is not necessary - trying to get an idea of what to expect when towing it. The 3/4 ton just does not ride as well for day to day driving.

Any advice you may have would be welcomed.
I have a 2009 Tundra 4 door with the short bed and the 6.7L engine and I have a 2007 30' Classic. I have been all over the USA and into Canada with no problems. The Tundra has more tan adequate power.

For me the essential item to have is the Hensley hitch. When I first got the rig I bought the standard equalizer hitch and sway was so bad that I lost control of the trailer 3 times just avoiding catastrophe. Going down a steep hill can be even more entertaining. The Airstream dealer in Grand Rapids, MI highly recommended the Hensley. So I bought one along with the Hensley brake controller and have not experienced the slightest amount of sway even less than a Fifth wheel I had owned. The problem is that when you have a 30' trailer being pulled by a 15' truck any gust of wind makes the trailer start oscillating from left to right behind the tow vehicle. Because there is rigid connection between the trailer and the truck the longer and heavier trailer will cause the truck to move left and right and since the truck is half the length of trailer the truck will move twice as far as the trailer. With each oscillation the movement increases and you could lose control completely. The Hensley is designed so that the trailer moves left and right on the hitch instead of moving the tow vehicle.

Other than that the Tundra performs well and as long as you keep the RPMsdow gets reasons fuel economy. I have gotten 14-15 mph on level roadway.
leesankey is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-04-2020, 01:13 PM   #20
3 Rivet Member
 
1995 34' Limited
Sarasota , Florida
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 179
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lovecamping View Post
I have a 2018 Tundra that is rated at 10K towing - 1000 tongue weight. I am considering purchasing a new 30 foot Classic - 7788 base weight. Have you had any issues towing an Airstream with your Tundra and if so - what is the size of the camper. What type of hitch would you recommend?

I know that a 3/4 ton truck would pull better , but hate to upgrade if it is not necessary - trying to get an idea of what to expect when towing it. The 3/4 ton just does not ride as well for day to day driving.

Any advice you may have would be welcomed.

To answer your question ProPride or Hensley Hitch. Which I have used both of and currently have a Hensley on my 30’ 2000 Excella. I tow with 2014 Tundra with no problems. In 2018 I crossed
Over the continental divide at least 12 times comfortably. The 4:30 gear in the rear end is responsible for the low gas mileage and torque. Everyone has an opinion I have personal experience. I have also had a 6 liter ford diesel. If you can afford the operation and maintenance cost diesels out pull any gasser
__________________

GatorDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Tow Mirrors - Needed on a Tundra? McStreamy_ Tow Vehicles 42 06-18-2019 09:45 AM
Ok, new question has come to mind... Tundra 5.7L owners this is for you wave man Tow Vehicles 53 10-07-2017 06:56 PM
Asking for Toyota Tundra owners and tow veterans... westcoastas Towing, Tow Vehicles & Hitches 40 10-04-2014 10:05 PM
Hooking up Tekonsha to a Tundra Help Needed! Libo Brakes & Brake Controllers 2 01-27-2009 12:00 AM
2008 Tundra & 2008 Land Cruiser TV advice Ray Eklund Tow Vehicles 2 02-21-2008 07:49 PM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 02:20 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.