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Old 11-13-2005, 10:19 AM   #81
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moogie32
Thanks, Aaron - yup they're the black plastic. I have a feeling that it's all available at the local Home Depot anyway. That's just one of those things that I'm on the fence as to whether it should be replaced as it appears to be in good shape. What are you doing with your copper feed lines?
I reused all of my black ABS plumbing. Solvent-weld unions could be used to re-join the cut vent pipes, but I had to use rubber-sleeves-with-hose-clamps to re-mount the black tank's plumbing due to the way everything went back together. FWIW, the local home improvement stores did not sell black ABS unions. However, the white PVC fittings had the right dimensions, and worked fine with the one-can-does-all-plastics glue the store sold.

I also reused all the original copper pipe that was not swollen due to freeze damage.

Tom
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Old 11-13-2005, 06:16 PM   #82
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Thumbs up Today's progress

Thanks Tom and Aaron. I was hoping that I could reuse both and now plan to. If I just am careful where I cut I think I can get away with just a couple to get everything out. I'm still on the fence as to whether or not I am going to add a grey tank at this point so even if I could get the drain lines apart I'd be splicing into them anyway.

Got a lot done today although none of it was on the inside. The weather was unseasonably warm up here in CT - I think it must have peaked at 70 degrees at noon- I took this opportunity to finally get in all my window weatherstrippping. Hurrah - all done - Just have the door to do now. One tip I sort of learned the hard way - once you get the weatherstripping adhered in place crank the windows closed but don't tighten them as far as they'll go. I did so with my rear window and the weatherstripping rode up in some areas making it not look as neat - I don't think it will affect keeping water out but it's not as asthetically pleasing.

Another big thing I accomplished was I made my own window clips. I've been looking for awhile and they are tough to find for '66- '67s. I found some thin gauge steel and using a hammer, pliers, screwdriver, and vice was able to fashion 4 that work just fine and don't look too bad either. I think I'll still keep an eye out for the real thing but in the meantime it's very nice to have clips on all windows. If you want to make one just use an original for a guide - by the time I was onto number 4 it was taking me something like 3 minutes to get it done. The worst part was cutting the steel with the miserable sheers that I was using. Nice to finally progress on this trailer!
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Old 11-13-2005, 06:36 PM   #83
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Go moogie!
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Old 11-13-2005, 10:39 PM   #84
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window clip fabrication

Thought I'd include a quick "how-to" on window clip construction...You'll need one of the clips off your trailer as a reference. All diagrams are in cross section view.

1) Start with a spare piece of metal and cut to the right width as original - if it's longer it can be trimmed at the end of fabrication.

2) I started making mine working from the part of the clip that sits outside of the window. There's a small lip on the original that I didn't bother to fabricate because it didn't seem necessary. Estimating the next bend in the clip I placed the metal into a vice and bent it 90 with a hammer. Pull it out and bend it into a "V" using the hammer.

3) Estimate where the next bend is and place the "V" into the vice and bend it at the correct length - I think this bend is something like 45 degrees but use your original as your pattern. I'm just doing this from memory!

4) Place the part you just bent into the vice at the proper length and bend it the last 90 degree turn. I needed to start this bend in the vice and then used pliers to get the proper contour. Spread the "V" with a screwdriver to the glass with fit into it. Trim any extra metal off.

5) Shows original shape with window and grabber in place.

6) Now go get yourself a cold one and take the rest of the after noon off!
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Old 11-14-2005, 07:22 AM   #85
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Way to go!!! (and you wondered why I wanted to write about you...)
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Old 11-22-2005, 10:06 PM   #86
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Silicone???

I read somewhere that once new weatherstripping was installed that some sort of silicone was supposed to be applied to it. Just spent a fair amount of time in the archives and can't locate anything. Does anyone know anything about this?

Thanks! Diane
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Old 11-22-2005, 10:42 PM   #87
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Quote:
Originally Posted by moogie32
I read somewhere that once new weatherstripping was installed that some sort of silicone was supposed to be applied to it. Just spent a fair amount of time in the archives and can't locate anything. Does anyone know anything about this?

Thanks! Diane
Probably just a regular spray silicone. You can spray it on a rag and wipe the weatherstrip. It keeps it from getting stuck to the glass. It's a good idea to do this just after you glue the weatherstrip as the excess glue can stick to the window when you close it. This prevents the nasty results!
Hey, Moogie- nice fab work!!
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Old 11-23-2005, 03:52 AM   #88
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A rose of a different color...

Quote:
Originally Posted by moogie32
... Just spent a fair amount of time in the archives and can't locate anything...
Diane,

Inland Andy has mentioned it's use several times, but for some reason, refers to it as "stupid spray". Search on that phrase and you will hit the motherload.

BTW, my owner's manual recommends the yearly use of silicone spray on all the window seals.

Tom
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Old 11-23-2005, 07:28 AM   #89
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I have purchased spray silicone from Napa. I spray it on a clean rag and wipe it on. It takes about three good heavey applications the first time. Then it is yearly maintenance from that point. Though I would think that twice a year would not hurt in the warmer/dryer climates....
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Old 11-28-2005, 09:39 PM   #90
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Thanks Guys!!!

Uh-oh! I'd better get out there and apply it! After I installed my front window and weatherstrippping I just shut it and hoped it wouldn't fall off! Now I have to worry it won't break upon opening it. I'll keep everyone posted on what happens..... Keep your fingers crossed!

Diane
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Old 12-29-2005, 10:08 PM   #91
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Thumbs up Sanding Breakthrough!!!

Hand-sanding my oak veneer is really taking a long time! I've been starting with a 60 grit and then working my way through 80, 120, 150, and finally 220. It might be sort of redundant but it does seem to be leaving the wood looking smooth and clean. I got the chance today to use some of my power sanding tools (air and belt sanders) on the solid shelf that resides over the streetside gaucho and was impressed by how fast the job went. I had always thought the the veneer was so thin on the non solid pieces that using anything other than a hand block was out of the question but was overjoyed to discover that's not true at all! I first tried the air sander which vibrates and seemed pretty gentle and even with 60 grit paper it worked well. I belt sanded with 80 and again, no problems. The air sander was even gentle enough to use on some slightly ragged areas where the bottom of the piece had encountered moisture on the floor by the fridge and had started to rot and seperate (I decided to just repair this area because it will be hidden by a gaucho). This is going to cut my sanding time down significantly! Yippee!
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Old 12-30-2005, 01:11 AM   #92
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'67 Safari Interior Renovation

Good going Diane! Great to hear about your progress with the interior parts sanding. I may have a little of that to do myself, but it looks more and more like mine will be minimal and refinished in place>YEAH! Having to do mostly re-oiling and varithane to complete my wood finishes. I am waiting for warmer weather to do that, and am concentrating on getting my electrical upgrading done while it's cold. I hope to be in towable shape by spring as I need to take the trailer to have a spare tire mount installed under the front window above the A-frame, but behind the propane tanks. I went to the junk yard and found a mount from the rear of a SUV that I sand blasted and had repainted to silver to go with the trailer and frame. Now the guy that does welding for me is going to work up a mount across the A-frame and to the front of the trailer to bolt the mount onto so it will be solid and won't scrape the front of the coach. The P/O had the spare tire just riding up there and locked (by chain) to the tongue and it has rubbed a circle into the Clearcoat as it had no protection between the tire and the coach skin. I think my remedy will be more functional and secure. It also allows the tire to be locked to the mount through one of the lug holes which, I think,will make it less likely to be stolen. Locks won't deter thieves but they do have a way of keeping honest people honest. Wishing you the Best for the New Year! Ed
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Old 12-30-2005, 08:52 AM   #93
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Field Trip

We store a 63 globetrotter in Diane's hometown and were surprised to hear there are 2 other vintage trailers in town. What an Airstream hotspot!

We had the pleasure of meeting Diane yesterday and saw her Safari. All newbies should be able to see a fully stripped trailer. It makes all the full monty and restoration discussion so much easier to visualize.

Her Safari is in great hands. Diane is a bright, friendly bundle of energy -- and a real inspiration!

63GT
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Old 12-30-2005, 08:57 AM   #94
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That's great Diane! All that sanding will be so worth it!

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Old 12-31-2005, 01:35 AM   #95
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 63GT
Her Safari is in great hands. Diane is a bright, friendly bundle of energy -- and a real inspiration!
63GT
And she and Eljay are moving to California next week! Imagine!!

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Old 12-31-2005, 08:40 AM   #96
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Diane,
You are at what I think is the hardest part. Fit and finish of the interior is the part I am afraid of. Keep on going!!!
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Old 12-31-2005, 12:15 PM   #97
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Talking I need spare help too!

Quote:
Originally Posted by BIGED52
I hope to be in towable shape by spring as I need to take the trailer to have a spare tire mount installed under the front window above the A-frame, but behind the propane tanks. I went to the junk yard and found a mount from the rear of a SUV that I sand blasted and had repainted to silver to go with the trailer and frame. Now the guy that does welding for me is going to work up a mount across the A-frame and to the front of the trailer to bolt the mount onto so it will be solid and won't scrape the front of the coach. The P/O had the spare tire just riding up there and locked (by chain) to the tongue and it has rubbed a circle into the Clearcoat as it had no protection between the tire and the coach skin. I think my remedy will be more functional and secure. It also allows the tire to be locked to the mount through one of the lug holes which, I think,will make it less likely to be stolen. Locks won't deter thieves but they do have a way of keeping honest people honest. Wishing you the Best for the New Year! Ed
Hi there Ed! Your idea for a spare tire holder sounds very interesting! I will have to do something similar for my set up as well. Currently my spare holder is riveted to the front panel of the trailer with about 50 rivets! A fellow Airstreamer courtesy parking with us this summer said it wasn't a good set-up at all because the trailer panels were never made to withstand the weight of a spare and steel holder. I got a look at 63GT's spare the other day and I'd like to try and mimic his set-up it sounds similar to yours. Take pictures of yours as your doing it. I'd be very interested to see how it's done. But the need for an actual spare is still a ways down the road! Thanks for you encouragement. It helps so much. Good luck with the electrical efforts and Happy New year back atcha! Diane
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Old 12-31-2005, 12:20 PM   #98
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 63GT
We store a 63 globetrotter in Diane's hometown and were surprised to hear there are 2 other vintage trailers in town. What an Airstream hotspot!

We had the pleasure of meeting Diane yesterday and saw her Safari. All newbies should be able to see a fully stripped trailer. It makes all the full monty and restoration discussion so much easier to visualize.

Her Safari is in great hands. Diane is a bright, friendly bundle of energy -- and a real inspiration!

63GT
63GT - The pleasure was all mine! It's great having other enthusiasts local for a change - If I can ever be of help to you, you now know where I live! Your GT is in wonderful shape - you certainly found a winner. For any one else wanting to examine a stripped Safari, my door is open to you as well. Anyone up for the lifting of a shell sometime? Tempting! Tempting! Diane
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Old 12-31-2005, 12:28 PM   #99
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Quote:
Originally Posted by till
Diane,
You are at what I think is the hardest part. Fit and finish of the interior is the part I am afraid of. Keep on going!!!
Mel, Ingrid, Tedd, I can't thank you enough for your encouragement. It really helps buoy the project along. Wish I had more time to devote to it. I still have to find the Tung Oil I'd like to try over the freshly sanded wood. I was using Danish oil but was unable to find it in the quantities I need because my poor interior is just lapping up the oil. It's just so dryed out! The finish of the interior doesn't scare me at all. The fit does more so, but the real thing that scares me is the electrical and plumbing part. Getting the wood done first allows me to procrastinate on the rest of it (including the floor!). I'll try and post pictures once I get some of these pieces done. Today I will sand the floor to ceiling piece that separates the front gaucho/dining portion from the fridge..... Happy New Year Everyone!!!! Diane
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Old 01-18-2006, 09:59 PM   #100
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Time for an update!

Just wanted to post the progress I've been making on refinishing the interior. So far I have finished the sanding on both refrigerator walls, the console over the refrigerator, the streetside front gaucho, the outer wall that leads to the bath and the streetside gaucho shelf. I began to apply tung oil and beeswax to the freshly sanded pieces, but wasn't happy at all with the lack of sheen. Uwe suggested a polymerized tung oil which I still need to order - that's why some pieces look more finished off than others. I switched sanders to using an electric vibrating unit which works well without the fear of belt-sanding through the thin veneer. I am still starting with 60 grit - I'm being careful and haven't burned through anything. It's fun to see some progress - the oak is really pretty - much nicer than before! I am currently disassembling the streetside overhead bin.
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