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Old 08-25-2020, 08:39 AM   #21
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1972 27' Overlander
Heinsburg , AB
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Now isn't that a pretty site; looks nice and solid. I'm interested to see how the next stage goes. Good luck as you go.
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Old 08-25-2020, 01:48 PM   #22
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1962 22' Safari
2016 30' Classic
Southeast , Michigan
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Your expert did you no favors splicing the rear sheet of plywood over the frame rails. Airstreams rely on full sheets of floor plywood for strength. Splicing above the rails eliminated the strength that a full sheet provided to holding up the shell and provide no way to put a backer board below the floor to restore that strength. As it was repaired in your case, additional stress will be put on the two tiny corner outriggers.

Those seams over the rails may end up showing thru your Marmoleum over time due to corner flex.
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Old 09-15-2020, 08:20 AM   #23
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The New Marmoleum Floors are in!












I think the floor material cost $1200 because we only wanted one seam and the trailer is 6" wider than one full sheet, so there was a lot of waste. Installation was around $500.00.


Now I have to remove the air conditioner (Who want a probably 1980's A/C unit that seems to work well?) and re-enforce the roof for the new one.


Then we have tons of rivets to install before the interior paint is applied.
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Old 09-20-2020, 01:26 PM   #24
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Looking for help re-enforcing the A/C area

Looking for help with new AC install.

I removed the old A/C from our 1964 Tradewind Airstream.

Some of the rivets on the interior around the A/C had popped and there appears to be a small divot in the roof behind where the A/C used to sit, so it seems I need more re-enforcement in the area.

The trim around the interior hole is identical to the trim on the vents and window, so it seems like it was a factory option. However, they didn't use the factory wiring and there doesn't seem to be a drip hose, so I'm not sure what happened when the existing A/C was installed

Everything I have read about re-enforcing the area seems to assume that there are strong spars in between the ribs. But the flimsy C-Channel around the AC is floating with rivets every two feet to the roof with another couple of rivets per piece to an additional sheet of interior grade aluminum between the c-channel and the ceiling.

There is C-Channel between ribs, but it is really flimsy and only connected to the ribs with 1 rivet.

How do I re-enforce it when there doesn't appear to be any support between the ribs?


Roof View after A/C removed



Roof View after A/C removed


Layout


Looking towards front of trailer


Looking left towards front


Looking right towards front


Looking towards rear of trailer




Looking right towards rear
https://storage.googleapis.com/airst...rear-right.jpg

Looking left towards rear


Looking further left towards rear
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Old 09-20-2020, 01:41 PM   #25
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1966 22' Safari
1955 22' Flying Cloud
Fredericksburg , Texas
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On the floaters at the gap, can you pre-drill some rivet holes in a 1 1/2Ē L bracket and rivet that to the floaters to connect everything? I had floating rails in our 55 and Colin Hyde said to connect all the floating horizontals.
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Old 09-20-2020, 01:53 PM   #26
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bubba L View Post
On the floaters at the gap, can you pre-drill some rivet holes in a 1 1/2Ē L bracket and rivet that to the floaters to connect everything? I had floating rails in our 55 and Colin Hyde said to connect all the floating horizontals.
That was my first thought until I realized that everything is floating around that area.
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Old 09-20-2020, 09:28 PM   #27
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Battle Ground , Washington
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I would suggest a metal surround to distribute the weight and make a better seal on the outside. I did this with 1.5" square aluminum tubing tig welded into a square. On my 58 that is the thickness between inner and outer walls. I bolted it to the rib and cross bracing to secure it in place. My cross bracing was riveted to the ribs (factory).

It locates the inner mounting bracket so it can't shift.

When you bolt down the ac, the outer roof skin will flatten out a bit to conform to the brace. I was willing to accept that minor deformity to provide a better seal between the unit and the roof.

Click image for larger version

Name:	ac support frame.jpg
Views:	40
Size:	202.6 KB
ID:	379133 Click image for larger version

Name:	ac support frame 2.jpg
Views:	31
Size:	223.9 KB
ID:	379132

Disregard the black rectangles, that was concerning a different topic.
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Old 10-06-2020, 10:26 AM   #28
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Thanks for your suggestion. I riffed on your concept, but two of my sides are longer to make a box between the ribs. I was looking forward to welding (braising) for the first time, but that 1.5" aluminum tubing turned out to be too big of a heat sink and I couldn't get the joint temperature above 500 degrees f. Therefore, I used L-brackets and bolts to put it all together with some JB weld at the box joints.









We can now do chin-ups on the support and I'm a little worried that I made it too strong. Also, I couldn't make a 14" square with 1.5" square aluminum tubing without removing the existing structure, so I hope the Coleman bracket will fit a 13.5" x 14" hole.





Quote:
Originally Posted by 57Vintage View Post
I would suggest a metal surround to distribute the weight and make a better seal on the outside. I did this with 1.5" square aluminum tubing tig welded into a square. On my 58 that is the thickness between inner and outer walls. I bolted it to the rib and cross bracing to secure it in place. My cross bracing was riveted to the ribs (factory).

It locates the inner mounting bracket so it can't shift.

When you bolt down the ac, the outer roof skin will flatten out a bit to conform to the brace. I was willing to accept that minor deformity to provide a better seal between the unit and the roof.

Attachment 379133 Attachment 379132

Disregard the black rectangles, that was concerning a different topic.
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Old 10-06-2020, 10:43 AM   #29
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If the inner bracket the bolts go through clears your reinforcement I believe you should be OK. Have you test fit it yet?
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Old 10-06-2020, 10:44 AM   #30
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No doubt that is strong. Your probably OK if the area stays dry, but the steel bolts and brackets might experience galvanic corrosion with the aluminum ribs if the joins get wet. I would have recommended aluminum "L's and aluminum rivets.
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Old 10-06-2020, 11:15 AM   #31
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We're looking at the Coleman NDQ air conditioner, which has been sold out around the country for at least a month. So I won't know for a while. Based on the pictures I've seen, the bolts are pretty far inside the 14", so I'm not worried about that.


Quote:
Originally Posted by 57Vintage View Post
If the inner bracket the bolts go through clears your reinforcement I believe you should be OK. Have you test fit it yet?
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Old 10-06-2020, 11:16 AM   #32
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That makes sense. Oops.

I hope it lasts for the next 20 years, or so. I think the aluminum sandwich and jb weld will be much stronger than what was there before even if every joint fails.

Also,the new air condition should be at least 20lbs lighter than the old one.

It should stay pretty dry in that area because the original insulation was in pristine condition.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 66Overlander View Post
No doubt that is strong. Your probably OK if the area stays dry, but the steel bolts and brackets might experience galvanic corrosion with the aluminum ribs if the joins get wet. I would have recommended aluminum "L's and aluminum rivets.
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Old 10-06-2020, 03:13 PM   #33
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I noticed the NDQ unit is 13.5 BTU. I hope that is sufficient for your size and areas you plan to camp in.
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Old 10-07-2020, 09:10 AM   #34
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I noticed the NDQ unit is 13.5 BTU. I hope that is sufficient for your size and areas you plan to camp in.
The old air conditioner was 13500 or lower.

Would a 15000 be much different in a 24 foot trailer?
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Old 10-07-2020, 09:42 AM   #35
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My experience in a 26' is 15K is not enough when temps get close to 100, other than to cool it down a bit when setting up. I reinsulated with prodex and 1" aluminum faced rigid insulation. Hopefully someone with a 24' can give you better input.

We're sort of fighting a losing battle. Only 1.5 inches to insulate. Thermal transfer from the outside through the ribs and single pane windows. I wouldn't set high expectations. After all we're 'roughing it' .
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Old 10-10-2020, 02:25 PM   #36
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New Rear Window Trim

Iím not sure what happened at the back window, but we didnít get all the trim back when the Airstream came back from the expert. Luckily we did get two pieces back and a local fabricator was able to reproduce all four.

Here is the front widow as an example of what it is supposed to look like:




This is what we got back:



This is the finished product:
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Old 10-10-2020, 02:32 PM   #37
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Ready for Paint and Prime

The trailer's getting primed right now. We decided against Zolatone and will be painting the interior with a Sherwin Williams Enamel paint.

Now we have to choose a color for the walls and style and finish for the cabinetry. We bought sheets of Walnut, Mahogany, and Maple plywood and finished 1 foot square sections with various colors of Rubio Monocoat and shellac.












Mahogany plywood seems to be the winner so far, and Lina's leaning toward traditional garnet shellac. How many coats of shellac have people used in their trailers?
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Old 10-10-2020, 02:35 PM   #38
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Power and Drain for AC

We finished buttoning up the inside to get ready for priming. Here's how I routed the new power and condensation drain for the AC.



Both will run inside the chimney and behind the fridge. Partly because I didn't want to mess the insulation in the walls and partly because I wanted to have access tot the drain line in case it ever clogged or fouled in the future.
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Old 02-21-2021, 06:23 PM   #39
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We're back in town, but have decided that this project won't be finished till 2022 because we expect campgrounds to be fully booked this year as well.

We'll still work on it periodically, but we have to get over the fiberglass bathroom hurdle first. No fiberglass guys in the Denver Metro Area wants to touch it so far, so we may be learning how to modify fiberglass.

In the meantime, Coleman apparently started making low-profile NDQ A/C units again and we got one of the first ones off the line. We plan on polishing the trailer at some point, so I don't want the condensation to drip randomly down the side. You can see that this unit has a long tray to catch the condensation with two drain nipples on either side OUTSIDE the mounting square. (I'm glad I took these pictures because I only saw one of them earlier.

I ran a 1/2" tube inside the trailer walls to catch it, but that tube is inside my 14" square access hole and the drains are outside the access.





I bought the Dometic kit and plan to modify it to fit. But does anyone have a better solution?

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Old 05-31-2022, 09:44 PM   #40
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I'm not sure when I'm going to start this project up again. we ripped everything out on the interior and put it in our garage and were planning to use the parts as templates, but I think I'm just going to re-envision the interior. I want my garage back. Does anyone want to make me an offer for the interior components of a 1964 Tradewinds, minus the appliances and bathroom fiberglass?

No toilet parts survived.

Pictures of the parts before they were removed are here https://photos.app.goo.gl/9bSrST2Dx8xgmqmN9

I also have a Magic Chef oven that seems to work. I had to replace a small pipe in the oven. The top burners seem to work perfectly. The oven pilots, lights, and heats up; but I never tested the temperature regulation. Oven pictures are here https://photos.app.goo.gl/CytnGjUgnPYr3BJd6

Make me an offer to pick it all up in the Denver area. You have to take it all.
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