Free 7 Day Trial RV GPS App RV Trip Planner Campground Reviews RV Maintenance Free 7 Day Trial ×
 


Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 09-13-2013, 07:42 PM   #401
Moderator
 
HiHoAgRV's Avatar

 
1991 34' Excella
1963 26' Overlander
1961 26' Overlander
Central , Mississippi
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,900
Images: 29
Blog Entries: 49
That's great news! We are waiting on cooler weather before starting the polishing routine.
__________________
Hi Ho Silver RV! Vernon, Sarah, Mac the Border Collie(RIP) -
A honkin' long 34' named AlumaTherapy https://www.airforums.com/forums/f20...num-54749.html
and a 26' '63 Overlander, Dolly https://www.airforums.com/forums/f10...ome-71609.html
HiHoAgRV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 07:54 PM   #402
Rivet Master
 
Becky B.'s Avatar
 
1964 17' Bambi II
Vintage Kin Owner
Schererville , Indiana
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,636
Images: 19
YAAY!!! I knew you could do it! Now all is well & you can sleep at night. I think I have one of those spots left on the Bambi II, but I'm over it.....there's always next Spring! The oldsters have lots of forgiving aluminum!
__________________
Becky


1964 Bambi II
1988 Avion 32S
Becky B. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 07:57 PM   #403
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiHoAgRV View Post
That's great news! We are waiting on cooler weather before starting the polishing routine.
It's 56 here now, I'm more worried about finishing the polishing before it becomes too cold!

Thanks for your help with polishing Mr. HiHo
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 08:01 PM   #404
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckybillrae View Post
YAAY!!! I knew you could do it! Now all is well & you can sleep at night. I think I have one of those spots left on the Bambi II, but I'm over it.....there's always next Spring! The oldsters have lots of forgiving aluminum!
Yep! Every time I walked by the trailer those spots jumped out at me, I was very happy to banish them! Just the tippy top roof left and then I can put all the lights and plates back and take some purty fall pictures

Thanks for the help Becky!
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 08:11 PM   #405
Rivet Master
 
webspinner's Avatar
 
1971 25' Tradewind
Menlo Park , California
Join Date: Jan 2010
Posts: 1,269
Images: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by reinergirl View Post
Was it more economical? Well out of just over a yard of fabric (40 x 60 inches wide) I get 16 bonnets for just under $10 or $1.60 a piece. The perfect polish material comes in a 10 pack for $68, one piece gives you 16 positions (assuming you can keep the cloth uncontaminated) so each "position" costs 50 cents. So no, not cost effective, ( gee, I wish I'd done this analysis first instead of waiting til now!) but all my bonnets stay uncontaminated in their own plastic baggies and can be washed easily.

I couldn't find all cotton sweatshirt material locally if you can, you might be able to reduce the cost! You could also just buy the perfect polish sweatshirt material and cut it up too, that would work out to 8 bonnets per piece or 85 cents a bonnet.
It's more economical than you think to make your own.

Former algebra teacher chiming in here to crunch some numbers. Grab a pencil and follow along, or just grab some popcorn and enjoy the show...

Home Made Bonnets
Fabric cost= $10
# of bonnets = 16
price/bonnet; $10/16 = 0.625, so about 63 cents apiece

Perfect Polish Bonnets
Fabric cost = $68
# of bonnets = 10 (amt) x 16 (positions for each) = 160
price/bonnet = $68/160 = 0.425, so about 43 cents apiece

It's all a questions of what gets divided by what.

It looks to me like the home made bonnets are a total win. For 20 cents a bonnet, you have convenience, cleanliness, and ease of use.
__________________
Barbie
Our travel and renovation blog: https://tinpickle.blogspot.com/
webspinner is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 08:24 PM   #406
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Oh my gosh, that is so embarrassing, I minored in mathematics in college! Can I blame it on one too many glasses of wine?

Thanks for the correction though! Makes me feel much better!
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 08:38 PM   #407
Rivet Master
 
Becky B.'s Avatar
 
1964 17' Bambi II
Vintage Kin Owner
Schererville , Indiana
Join Date: Jul 2005
Posts: 2,636
Images: 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by reinergirl View Post
Oh my gosh, that is so embarrassing, I minored in mathematics in college! Can I blame it on one too many glasses of wine?

Thanks for the correction though! Makes me feel much better!
Ha! Ha! That's too funny! Maybe it's the wine that makes it funny~
__________________
Becky


1964 Bambi II
1988 Avion 32S
Becky B. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 08:41 PM   #408
Moderator
 
HiHoAgRV's Avatar

 
1991 34' Excella
1963 26' Overlander
1961 26' Overlander
Central , Mississippi
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,900
Images: 29
Blog Entries: 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by beckybillrae View Post

Ha! Ha! That's too funny! Maybe it's the wine that makes it funny~
1 glass, 2 glass, 3 glass, floor

College Math, right?
__________________
Hi Ho Silver RV! Vernon, Sarah, Mac the Border Collie(RIP) -
A honkin' long 34' named AlumaTherapy https://www.airforums.com/forums/f20...num-54749.html
and a 26' '63 Overlander, Dolly https://www.airforums.com/forums/f10...ome-71609.html
HiHoAgRV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 08:45 PM   #409
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Okay, if it wasn't the wine, I was abducted by aliens and they messed with my wine mind. That's my story and I'm sticking to it!

I just told my hubby and he's laughing hysterically
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2013, 10:14 PM   #410
Rivet Master
 
safari62's Avatar
 
1962 22' Safari
1957 22' Custom
1963 16' Bambi
Vacationland , Maine
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 951
Images: 43
its still dirty business

Quote:
Originally Posted by webspinner View Post
It's more economical than you think to make your own.

Former algebra teacher chiming in here to crunch some numbers. Grab a pencil and follow along, or just grab some popcorn and enjoy the show...

Home Made Bonnets
Fabric cost= $10
# of bonnets = 16
price/bonnet; $10/16 = 0.625, so about 63 cents apiece

Perfect Polish Bonnets
Fabric cost = $68
# of bonnets = 10 (amt) x 16 (positions for each) = 160
price/bonnet = $68/160 = 0.425, so about 43 cents apiece

It's all a questions of what gets divided by what.

It looks to me like the home made bonnets are a total win. For 20 cents a bonnet, you have convenience, cleanliness, and ease of use.
I am easily confused by numbers in the first place...and had to read this over a few times. Should this last line include "for 20 cents MORE per bonnet" So we are making the assumption the extra cost (and labor) for single bonnets saves on convenience, cleaniness, and ease of use?

I would think there will be all kinds of trade offs in the two methods depending on the time it takes to change the single bonnett as compared to the large wrapped piece including the time to locate fabric and making of each bonnet. I thought about making my own mirco fiber sheets also but never found the right fabric.

I think the single method will have one major advantage over the big wrap that is the Cyclo will run cooler. I find it very difficult to keep the fabric from getting in front of the cooling vents and the machine gets burning HOT! I Also had to dismantle it to remove dirty fuzzy fibers the built up around the brushes when it decided not to run anymore.

Finally (what a blowhard huh?) I still have a few sheets of Prefect Polish fabric left after nine years of this strange hobby. So it kind of lasts longer then I thought.
Gary
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	DSC_0058.jpg
Views:	109
Size:	164.8 KB
ID:	195630  
__________________
wbcci #3363
VAC - Region 1 vintage Club rep
New England unit
safari62 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 05:19 PM   #411
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
windows, windows windows!

If you've ever thought about painting the interior trim to your windows DON'T! Because eventually the paint will start to peel and then you'll have to remove it, or do what a previous owner did, just paint another layer!!

Do you know how many hours it takes to get from here....


to here??
Lots!! With lots of Citrastrip, wooden popsicle sticks, and gray scotch brite....and swearing...and swearing holding a wineglass in one hand and an icepack in the other because your hands are in spasms. Seriously, put away the paintbrush.

Here's what lurks beneath when you use a lot of silicone in the attempt to seal the window.


Ugly huh? The water was trapped against the skin and the result was significant corrosion.With a lot of elbow grease it can get better but won't ever go away.

I was going to write this post on how to restore your windows, but better people than I have already done this. See here for a few threads:

Frank's Trailer Works Blog: March 2009
Window Repair-1954-1958 - Vintage Airstream

So instead I'm going to do a handy hints post! How to do it right the first time and tips/tools that help the process go smoother. Including how to get that pesky window spacer back in!

Going into this I foolishly estimated a day a window. In reality, I averaged about 14 hours a window. I'd like to say this job is completely finished (and it's true all seven windows are in and leak free) but I still have strip and clean all the hardware, so I can't say that this job is done..... hold on while I go breathe into a paper bag. It would be nice to cross one big job off my list but I'm putting the hardware aside to do this winter.

In no particular order here are my tips!
  • Set screws - Above each window in the middle is a set screw. You'll probably have to bend the drip rail up to access it. It holds a little plastic piece in place that stops the window from sliding left or right. This is important because if you try to close the window when it is not aligned you will bend the upper hinge. Not a good thing trust me! The plastic piece I'll get to later but the set screw removal is easy once you know the trick! Place a flat edged screwdriver at a 90 degree angle to the head, whack it a good one, do the same on the other side. Clean out the set screw head really well with a dental pick, if it's really rusty it helps to use a liitle sandpaper on the head to be able to see where the threads are. Use a Phillips head screwdriver that fits VERY WELL and deep. Keep trying different screwdrivers until you have one that fits. Don't use one that doesn't fit, don't even attempt it because you will strip the screw so fast and then you will be SCREWED... no pun intended... well, maybe a little one Slowly back the screw out, once it gets started you are home free and can switch over to needle nose pliers if necessary. If your first try doesn't budge it, hit it a few more times with the hammer and screwdriver. It is crucial to break the rusty bond. The first window I worked on the screw for three days with PBblaster and such before a forums member sent me the above tip (Thanks Scott G!) By the way, this tip works equally as well on the screws holding the window hardware on. Unless they are painted like mine were, then its best to strip the paint as much as possible first. Its amazing how much a little paint can "glue" those screws in place.
  • When you are trying to get the window lifter out it helps to cut the plastic thingy in the track and then reach in with a pick and pull out the small spring, then you can just wiggle the arm out. This is the plastic piece after I removed the arm.

  • Plan carefully on how you want the window to slide out. Otherwise you'll end up with one of these . On the new aluminum panel no less! Grrrrrr The curvature of the trailer was just enough that the window grazed it while I was sliding it out. Don't forget to catch the little plastic piece that drop out when you pass the halfway mark!

.
  • Glass - I ordered the first window with 3/32 (single strength) glass because that's what the forum said was original. Well, that glass is THIN, so thin it bends in a stiff breeze. And when I compared it to what was original it was definitely thinner! I reordered in 1/8 inch (double strength) and was much happier. Glad I ordered one as a test!
  • Tempered Glass - I ordered the large front and back windows in tempered thinking that these were the most likely to break. When the glass shop has them tempered they put a "mark" on them to signify it. I positioned it in the upper left corner and it is hardly noticeable. If this "mark" is going to bug you then you can request that they leave it off. I forgot and thankfully the mark was very faint.
  • Cleaning up the window frames and the back frames is tedious, tedious, tedious. I tried lots of different methods, once I got sick of sandpaper that is Anyway, frankly sandpaper wasn't working great anyway, I ended up using 3m maroon scotchbrite and WD40, followed by the gray scotchbrite pads and wd40. Way easier, less steps and very good results. I used truck box polish from the big blue box store to hand polish the frames. Yes, I said hand polish! With all the nooks and crannies I found that I was getting better results by hand. Note, these frames are aluminum extrusions, I'd be very hesitant to use scotchbright on alclad.
See how corroded it is to the left? The right side was cleaned up using scotchbrite and wd40 for just a minute or so. Lots more to go
  • Putting in the gray rubber trim into the window back frame. The flange on the bulb trim is longer on one side than the other. The short side goes to the back. I know VTS recommends you put the short side in first and push in the front, I found it way easier to put the front side in first and push the short side in the back with a small screwdriver. Position the beginning at the middle of the top under the drip rail. Where the two ends meet I cut a small piece of tube off, slit it horizontally, rolled it up and used it to join the ends (just slide it inside). Makes a neater and leak free junction. Here's it cut off and rolled up, ready to insert into the ends of your window trim.
  • Its not necessary to break the glass out into a million pieces that you then have to chase around cleaning up (unless that kind of thing is enjoyable for you, that is!) I set the frame out in the sun to get good and hot, and was able to use a putty knife to pry the glass away from the frame pretty easily. A heat gun will do the same thing, Heat is the secret!
  • The Butyl tape is positioned on its paper so that if you line up the edge and put it directly on the outer most edge of the channel it will be aligned perfectly, I used a small popsicle stick to run down the edge and fits in the track perfectly. Accept the fact that you will make a mistake and drop a piece of glass in wrong, it's gonna happen. The good news is that you get to play with the wrecked butyl tape. Anyone remember Gumby?

OH NO Mr. Bill!
  • Window trim. By far the hardest thing is to cut the corners of the gray window trim so they fit well, look nice and are leak proof.
ORDER EXTRA! I ordered two extra pieces which I bungled early on - so basically I had to hold my breath for the last two windows and hope I didn't screw up!

I used a woodworkers trick for cutting the trim called coping instead of simply mitering the joint (cutting on a diagonal).

First lay your window frame so the top is up. At this point make sure that track that the gray molding pops into is ABSOLUTELY spotless and clean from debris. The bottom piece goes in first and that is butt cut (90 degrees) on both sides leaving a little gap for the side piece to fit into.

The side pieces are coped at the bottom. This will allow water to shed rather than penetrate the joint.

I measured by popping the gray molding into the track an inch or so away and sliding it down into the corner, you can do this a quite a few times. Just be careful not to twist the molding too much ( I soooo should have videoed this..... Sorry!) Once you have cut the angle right pop it out one last time and back bevel the edge (using a razor blade shave the diagonal at a 45 degree angle). This will allow the side piece to lie flat on the bottom piece and create a really nice tight joint. Put a dollop of a clear sealant (I like Lexol) in the corner on the bottom gray molding and one last time pop the molding into the track an inch away and slide it down into place.

I had good pictures of all of this but they've taken a walkabout on my computer! Here's a picture of the top edge and a coped joint.

See the space I left at the top in order to slide the mitered piece into place?

Here's where I back beveled it with a razor blade..

Continue popping the track into place toward the upper corner when you get close trim the end at 90 degress and don't forget to leave a small space at the top for the top piece, I tried a bunch of different tools to pop the molding into the track. If you press too hard you'll get white spots so be careful!

In the end I found the perfect tool, big enough to get leverage with, and the black rubber triangular end really gripped against the molding. It's a tool used to grout! Hopefully you've got one lying around.!



Once you've got both side pieces in, its time to do the top! This is by far the hardest because BOTH ends need coping. Cope one side, then measure carefully and cope the other. It doesn't matter which end you start with.

They sure do look nice when they are done! Ignore the blue tape, its keeping my kitchen fan vent from leaking while I figure out how to fix it! (Open to ideas folks!!)

Because I managed to lose the photos here's a mock up of how the trim is cut (in miniature!) Cutting it this way makes the joints far less likely to leak.

That's all I got folk! Oh yeah, one more, I promised you the secret of how to get these in, right? These are the little plastic pieces that the set screw goes through in the center of the top of the window.



Well, I spent the first dozen attempts lining these little pieces up to match the profile on the window hinge while trying to slide it in. The secret is you need to position the plastic piece as if the window was closed. You see the window hinge will slide in and rotate 90 degrees down but that plastic piece does not rotate. It has to slide into the window groove already in its' final position. It won't line up with the window track at all, in fact it needs to be 90 degrees different. Hope this makes sense! Once you've done one, the rest will be easy! Well, relatively easy!

Happiness is...leak free windows! On to Fantastic fans......
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 08:08 PM   #412
Moderator
 
HiHoAgRV's Avatar

 
1991 34' Excella
1963 26' Overlander
1961 26' Overlander
Central , Mississippi
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 5,900
Images: 29
Blog Entries: 49
Don't paint the windows!...I'm with you 100%! I ended up cleaning the hardware but had to stoop to sanding and repainting the inside frame.
__________________
Hi Ho Silver RV! Vernon, Sarah, Mac the Border Collie(RIP) -
A honkin' long 34' named AlumaTherapy https://www.airforums.com/forums/f20...num-54749.html
and a 26' '63 Overlander, Dolly https://www.airforums.com/forums/f10...ome-71609.html
HiHoAgRV is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 09:19 PM   #413
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by reinergirl View Post
  • Putting in the gray rubber trim into the window back frame. The flange on the bulb trim is longer on one side than the other. The short side goes to the back. I know VTS recommends you put the short side in first and push in the front, I found it way easier to put the front side in first and push the short side in the back with a small screwdriver. Position the beginning at the middle of the top under the drip rail. Where the two ends meet I cut a small piece of tube off, slit it horizontally, rolled it up and used it to join the ends (just slide it inside). Makes a neater and leak free junction. Here's it cut off and rolled up, ready to insert into the ends of your window trim.
I just realized the picture to this never posted, here it is
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1040168.jpg
Views:	160
Size:	153.5 KB
ID:	196568
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-27-2013, 09:35 PM   #414
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by HiHoAgRV View Post
Don't paint the windows!...I'm with you 100%! I ended up cleaning the hardware but had to stoop to sanding and repainting the inside frame.
I am glad I did strip the window frames but labor intensive it surely was. I like how the window catches clean up though. Here's a preview
Click image for larger version

Name:	P1030865.jpg
Views:	143
Size:	164.1 KB
ID:	196569
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 07:22 AM   #415
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
I'm practicing bucking rivets! There's a brass regulator that came with the bucking gun from VTS. No instructions which is IMHO is VTS's biggest problem.
Anyway the brass regulator is numbered 1-6. What the heck do these correspond to? I have the gauge on the compressor set to 120 but how to I know what the brass regulator should be set at?
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 08:02 AM   #416
Always learning
 
Lance M's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
1962 19' Globetrotter
1951 21' Flying Cloud
Central , Texas
Join Date: Oct 2010
Posts: 2,867
Images: 24
Blog Entries: 2
Send a message via Yahoo to Lance M
Shelly,
It is a simple air regulator. You can use it to adjust how hard or soft the gun will hammer the rivet. You'll have to play with it to get the right setting. I usually have the line pressure set at 85psi and make adjustments with the brass regulator.
__________________
Lance

Work is never done, so take time to play!
Lance M is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 08:42 AM   #417
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Thanks Top,

I've been playing with it using the gun against a piece of wood to see how deep the dent is. As far as I can tell there is absolutely no difference no matter what I have the brass regulator set at. Wish you were my neighbor I'll keep playing....
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 10:00 AM   #418
Restorations done right
Commercial Member
 
Frank's Trailer Works's Avatar
 
1962 26' Overlander
1961 26' Overlander
Vintage Kin Owner
Currently Looking...
Baltimore , Maryland
Join Date: Aug 2007
Posts: 5,545
Images: 2
turn the real regulator back to 90psi max...
Frank's Trailer Works is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2013, 06:19 PM   #419
Site Team
 
reinergirl's Avatar

 
1963 26' Overlander
Hollis , New Hampshire
Join Date: Oct 2009
Posts: 2,644
Images: 15
Thanks Frank, will do!
__________________
Shelly : TAC NH-6 | AIR 41359
Visit my blog!
Parts needed : Braund Antenna front tube fold down model!
reinergirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-03-2013, 07:01 AM   #420
Rivet Master
 
Aerowood's Avatar
 
1971 21' Globetrotter
Arvada , Colorado
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 3,040
I though that you were shooting rivets at the Resto Rally a couple of years ago? It's like ridding a bike. Who's going to be your bucker, as you need to practice with that person as well. More aluminum is messed up by the bucker by removing the bar to soon or slipping off and placing the bar next to the buck tail and not on the rivet. If you want to come over to my place this weekend we can do some more practicing.
Aerowood is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Tags
1963, 1963 overlander


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
NEEDED: Two front windows for '71 Overlander jesse_kevon Windows, Doors, Locks & Vents 4 05-30-2015 09:26 AM
Need Door for 1961 Overlander BentMetal 1960 - 1964 Overlander 9 07-28-2011 04:36 PM
Need Refrigerator Compartment Door for 1972 Overlander jazz1945 Exterior Storage Compartments & Access Doors 1 05-30-2011 02:50 PM
My 1963 Overlander Exterior Corle0ne Cleaning, Stripping & Polishing 3 04-29-2011 10:25 AM
should i buy a new toilet for my 1963 overlander? harrison Sinks, Showers & Toilets 3 04-26-2011 04:42 AM


Featured Campgrounds

Reviews provided by

Disclaimer:

This website is not affiliated with or endorsed by the Airstream, Inc. or any of its affiliates. Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.



All times are GMT -6. The time now is 07:20 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2021, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.