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-   -   overfilled water tank (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f443/overfilled-water-tank-33300.html)

Fyrzowt 06-15-2007 12:35 AM

Bummer
 
I'm sorry this happened to you, especially just before you need it.

As far as the how...the vent tube is much smaller than the inlet tube. Then it becomes a matter of physics.
Multiply the width of the tank by the length, then multiply that by the pressure that the water exerted in pounds - it adds up quick. This is the same principle that allows us to lift a heavy truck with a rescue airbag using 120 pounds of air.
Example: a 24" X 24" airbag will lift almost 70,000 pounds with 120 pounds of air pressure. (69,120 pounds)

We obviously don't know exactly how much pressure there was, and I guess it really doesn't matter. It is a reminder to all of us, it's just too bad it had to happen to you. I'm sorry.
Dave

overlander63 06-15-2007 06:34 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Fyrzowt
i
Example: a 24" X 24" airbag will lift almost 70,000 pounds with 120 pounds of air pressure. (69,120 pounds)

"Normal" water pressure is about 35psi, I've seen it as high as 60. 35psi, and a surface size of about 30" square, will generate over 4000 pounds of force, more than enough to buckle the floor and some steel frame members.:blink:

Silvertwinkie 06-15-2007 07:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overlander63
"Normal" water pressure is about 35psi, I've seen it as high as 60. 35psi, and a surface size of about 30" square, will generate over 4000 pounds of force, more than enough to buckle the floor and some steel frame members.:blink:

WOW, I didn't realize it was that much...I was thinking around 15psi. :huh::blink:

markdoane 06-15-2007 07:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overlander63
"Normal" water pressure is about 35psi, I've seen it as high as 60. 35psi, and a surface size of about 30" square, will generate over 4000 pounds of force, more than enough to buckle the floor and some steel frame members.:blink:

Terry,

Where did you get those numbers?
Check the math.:huh:

JK3500 06-15-2007 08:16 AM

Appreciate all your input on filling fresh water tanks and hopefully this will help prevent others from having something like this happen. In our case, from reading some previous threads concerning difficult tank filling, though I have not yet removed the filler tube I believe there may be a kink in it as it has always been difficult to fill as the water typically ran right back out of the filler neck unless the hose was inserted well into the filler tube, requiring the water to be "forced" in. Obviously in this case the water was "forced"in too fast and when the hose was not removed once the tank was full the continued pressure bowed the tank, cracking the floor and blowing out the bottom drain valve.

honestly, what we are really looking for now is ideas for how to fix. I know the water tank will likely need to be replaced, along with the tank cover and brackets, as they also are severely bowed. That seems to be fairly straightforward and I am sure when I remove the tank I will find other pieces that need to be replaced.

My larger concern is the floor, which is cracked and will need to be replaced. Can only the section of floor that is cracked be replaced or will I need to replace the entire floor? In other words, is there a way to fix this without gutting the entire trailer and replacing the entire floor. I guess the plus side is we could take the opportunity to replace the vinyl flooring with cork or wood....

Hopefully the insurance will cover this, as we do not have the time or $ right now to fix the floor. If not, we will just replace the tank and associated pieces and look at repairing/replacing the floor sometime down the road.

Right now though, we are going to pack up and head to the mountains for the weekend and deal with all this next week. Being long time dry campers with tents and then a small pop-up, we know that indoor plumbing and toilets are not a prerequisite for an enjoyable camping trip. Looking forward to an enjoyable weekend as I am sure when we get back the water tank will still be broke. jk

jcanavera 06-15-2007 08:41 AM

I use a varient of this device to fill my tank. It fits into the fill inlet but does not block the entire inlet so air or excess water can escape.

Camco E-Z Fill Water Tank Fillers - Camping World

Jack

Aria 06-15-2007 09:24 AM

Thanks for all the information. Something so simple. We would never think so much damage could happen. Thanks again. Aria

Inland RV Center, In 06-15-2007 09:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JK3500
thanks for the info andy. the tank does not look hard to remove. i was able to push the floor dow to where it is now almost level, with only a slight bulge. the wood underneath the linoleum is obviously cracked.

however, we were planning on taking a short trip this weekend. right now thinking about still taking the trip (to crested butte), just without water, and surveying the damage when we return. question is, did the trailer likely sustain any structural damage from the tank bowing out or should I be ok for a short trip?

also talked to my insurance company and they are sending an appraiser out to determine if it is a claimable loss. hopefully so, as i am sure replacing the floor will be pretty extensive (and expensive). we'll see... jk

Your OK to make the trip.

Use the water tank. The trip will confirm if the tank is ok or not.

Water tanks are usually easily removed. Be patient though when you do it.

Your insurance company should cover the loss as a comprehensive loss.

You still need to inspect the chassis, for damage. A cross member could be damaged as well as the center frame support.

Andy

JK3500 06-15-2007 10:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inland RV Center, In
Your OK to make the trip.

Use the water tank. The trip will confirm if the tank is ok or not.

Water tanks are usually easily removed. Be patient though when you do it.

Your insurance company should cover the loss as a comprehensive loss.

You still need to inspect the chassis, for damage. A cross member could be damaged as well as the center frame support.

Andy

Thanks Andy! Looking forward to the trip. Will send an update next week once we start tearing into it. jk

Inland RV Center, In 06-15-2007 10:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by JK3500
Thanks Andy! Looking forward to the trip. Will send an update next week once we start tearing into it. jk

Have a great weekend.

Watch out for those snow storms.:D

Andy

Fyrzowt 06-15-2007 10:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Silvertwinkie
WOW, I didn't realize it was that much...I was thinking around 15psi. :huh::blink:

Some of our hydrants run 140# to 150# pressure. It becomes important to have a working pressure reducer for both house and trailer.

ROBERTSUNRUS 06-16-2007 12:09 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by overlander63
"Normal" water pressure is about 35psi, I've seen it as high as 60. 35psi, and a surface size of about 30" square, will generate over 4000 pounds of force, more than enough to buckle the floor and some steel frame members.:blink:

:) Hi, Terry. I agree with this except for the fact that how are you going to maintain this pressure even with, let's say, a 5/8" water hose versus a 1/2" vent tube. This would be like trying to fill a tire [with air] with a 1/4" bolt hole in it. With the water hose stuck in the filler and a blocked or pinched vent tube, this makes more since. Also like your gas filler on your car or truck, if the vent is blocked, it is very hard to fill your tank. My bets are still on a vent problem.

Fyrzowt 06-16-2007 12:30 AM

I have never had a vent problem in any of my trailers, but I have over pressurized the tank to the point that when I remove the fill hose, a water column comes back out the fill tube, as well as out the vent. I think it could damage the tank that way if left in long enough.
That isn't to say that there can't also be a vent problem which would only compound the problem.
Dave

overlander63 06-16-2007 07:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by markdoane
Terry,

Where did you get those numbers?
Check the math.:huh:

Sorry, that should have read something like "support", or "lift". I also moved a decimal point the wrong way, either way, it's still a significant amount.:blush:


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