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-   -   Altitude generator adjustment (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f448/altitude-generator-adjustment-32478.html)

ESCAPE POD 05-15-2007 02:01 PM

Altitude generator adjustment
 
I have a Honda 2000 gas generator, and will be operating it at 8K ft. Does anyone know how to adjust the carburetor for high-altitude use?

JK3500 05-15-2007 03:37 PM

From what I understand the carbs on these generators come preset from the factory and are not adjustable at the user level (someone correct me if i am wrong). One of the advantages of the propane conversions is you have the ability to adjust the fuel mixture for optimal operation at altitude.

FWIW, my Yamaha 2400is generator straight from the factory worked just fine here at 8600' on gas. It did run a bit smoother on propane after the conversion with the fuel/air mixture dialed in. jk

Silvertwinkie 05-15-2007 03:42 PM

I heard the same thing FWIW, but I cannot confirm this is so....I can however say the propane modified gens can be adjusted....or at least the one I got from US Carb (Yamaha 1000).

silverback 05-15-2007 04:18 PM

I've used an EU2000 (petrol) at 9K feet and didn't know I might have problems until I saw that in the manual. You probably will have to use more choke to start it.
-KL

DFord79 06-10-2007 10:10 AM

Don't worry about altitude. It will run fine I have been told by a local Honda dealer. Switching to propane does allow for adjustment but you also loose 10% efficentcy over gas (per my local dealer).

Excella CM 06-10-2007 10:30 AM

It may have compensation built in-some newer equipment does. The higher you go, the less oxygen(and the less power available). This means less fuel can be burned. As you go up, the mixture must be leaned out to maintain a 15:1 ratio. Symptoms of an over rich mixture are the same as reunning with the choke on.

azflycaster 06-10-2007 10:37 AM

I have run my EU1000 at up to 9000 feet with no problems. It starts on the first pull almost every time.

lsinclair 06-10-2007 10:53 AM

I have two EU2000 and have had no issues starting or running. We live at 8K and have operated them at 10K elevation. Fuel consumption is very low at these elevations.
Safe and enjoyable travels,
Larry

Motoman 06-10-2007 09:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ESCAPE POD
I have a Honda 2000 gas generator, and will be operating it at 8K ft. Does anyone know how to adjust the carburetor for high-altitude use?

If you were going to operate the generator at high altitude for almost all of its life you would want to modify the carberutor to lean out the mixture. Years ago the carburetor might have had an adjustible main jet but today you would disassemble the carburetor and replace the main jet, possibly the idle jet and othe parts in the fuel mixture circuit to lean out the mixture. You can buy the main jet and other parts at a Honda dealer ( see this web site as an example Plano Power Equipment Online Store - Honda EU2000i Generator Common Parts ). There are replacement jets for 4000-7000 ft, 6000-10,000 ft and 9000 to 15,000 ft.

You would not want to rejet the carburetor for occassional use at high altitude, only if its primary use was above 5000 ft and it would rarely be used below that elevation. Running an engine jetted for low elevation at 5000 ft and above would cause it to run slightly rich and not likely damage the engine. However, running an engine at lower elevations when it was jetted for operation above 5000 ft will cause it to run lean, possibly overheat and result in shorter valve life. I agree with the other responders, choose which condition best fits the majority of your use and then either leave the jetting stock or change it based upon your decision.

Tin Diesel 10-19-2009 01:49 PM

This is an old thread, but I didn't want to start a new one on the topic of gas engines at altitude.

Responding to this thread, we bought our EU2000 in TX - altitude 75 feet(!) It runs fine where we do most of our boondocking in Colorado (altitude 8200 feet) - although I hope that we're not damaging it since most of its use is at that higher altitude.

The reason for posting now is that not all engines seem to be able to handle the altitude difference as well. I have a Husqvarna chain saw (also bought in Houston). Using it mostly in Colorado for the last two years to cut up dried aspen, I was surprised at how little power it had. Granted the logs were large (18" diamater), but it would bog down with the slightest pressure.

Home in Houston, I just had to cut up a large white oak that fell in a storm - hard hard wood! That Husqvarna was a different machine at 75'. Wow! It ripped through the oak like a knife through butter with power to spare.

JK3500 10-20-2009 06:26 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tin Diesel (Post 761195)
The reason for posting now is that not all engines seem to be able to handle the altitude difference as well. I have a Husqvarna chain saw (also bought in Houston). Using it mostly in Colorado for the last two years to cut up dried aspen, I was surprised at how little power it had. Granted the logs were large (18" diamater), but it would bog down with the slightest pressure.

Home in Houston, I just had to cut up a large white oak that fell in a storm - hard hard wood! That Husqvarna was a different machine at 75'. Wow! It ripped through the oak like a knife through butter with power to spare.

That's because you should've bought a Stihl. (just kidding).

I really can't help as I bought my chainsaw here in CO and only used it here. If it's underpowered I wouldn't know it. Maybe take it to a chainsaw dealer and ask if they are jetted different for up here. kl

wmarsha 10-20-2009 10:17 AM

2 stroke vs 4
 
chain saws are generally 2 stroke engines and the intake/exhaust is critical for them to operate correctly. a two stroke develops best hp when "on the pipe." motorcycle enthusiasts will know that term. but for a 2 stroke to be effective, it must be tuned for the altitude. and if you are a serious motorcycle racer, you'd change the exhaust system for high altitude. a 4 stroke is much more forgiving on fuel air ratios-besides there aint much you can do to tune a 2000watt gen that is the size of a double loaf of bread.:innocent:

moosetags 10-20-2009 10:52 AM

Greetings from the Florida Panhandle
 
We run two Honda 2000's on a regular basis. We have found that the higher the higher the altitude, the lesser the power output. The Hondas seem to run just fine, but don't put out as much juice.

Brian


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