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Aerowood 09-21-2008 03:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by urbanfood (Post 618603)

and since i had to break out the welder again and grind of some of the por15, i decided to add another angle at the step which will help prevent a soft spot at the door becuase of additional support (this probably should have been there to begin with because where i put the angle is where everyone bears their weight each time they enter the trailer;

Put a piece of aluminum over the step well to protect the sub floor from water.

Kip

soldiermedic 09-21-2008 03:42 PM

David,

Any chance that company that made you wheel wells would make new ones and ship them to Missouri?

Steve

urbanfood 09-22-2008 08:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aerowood (Post 618966)
Put a piece of aluminum over the step well to protect the sub floor from water. Kip

good idea kip. i've been debating that one for awhile thinking that WITH the aluminum water could get trapped between the bottom of the plywood and aluminum sheet leading to premature wood rot OR WITHOUT the plywood is exposed to the elements. i think i will put the aluminum sheet on and take my chances that way. is there an adhesive to adhere aluminum to plywood?

Quote:

Originally Posted by soldiermedic (Post 618970)
David,

Any chance that company that made you wheel wells would make new ones and ship them to Missouri?

Steve

steve, unfortunatley i don't think they would do it. they aren't set up for mail order/shipping out. they are pretty big and bulky at 3' long by 15 or so inches wide. you should check you're local sheet metal supply shop, the guys that do metal work for roofers, hvac, etc. one word of caution is i had one guy quote me $900 which i knew was out of line, i showed up at his shop and was right there ready to give him the job with wheel wells in hand until he said that, my mouth almost dropped. i then went back to my office and drew a couple of pictures and faxed them over to another guy for a quote. i had a phone conversation with him and he quoted me $75 a piece which sounded about right to me.

NorCal Bambi 09-23-2008 08:01 AM

urbanfood, Several years ago I was making sculpture where the bases were wooden boxes covered with aluminum sheeting. When they were finished they looked like solid boxes make of aluminum. They were make just like putting Formica sheets on plywood. To get the aluminum sheets to stick well I would take the side that was going to be coated with contact cement and us a sander with 60 grit sandpaper to rough up the surface. I also used the method of applying one coat of contact cement letting it dry then applying a second coat of contact cement. These sculptures were always in an indoor environment, so I don't know how they would hold up in a high humidity environment. Formica on sink tops seems to hold up pretty well. I was thinking of using this method on the bottom of my plywood floor. However i didn't try it. At the time cost and time kept me form using it. One other thing that world be need is a thin layer of plastic sheet or similar material between the aluminum sheeting and the steel trailer frame. On the two trailers I've worked on I've noticed that the aluminum that was attached to steel on the bottom of the trailer where water is constant problem. The aluminum corrodes badly. Anyway this is just shared information. If you do try this I would be very interestsed in how it works. An after thought. Maybe applying a thin sheet ot some kind of plastic sheeting with contact cement would work well. There are plastics out there that contact cement won't melt. Trimming the aluminum with a router also made the edges very smooth and neat.
Don

MarkR 09-24-2008 08:03 PM

3 Attachment(s)
Hi, I am presently working on this exact issue/spot. I chose to wrap the front edge and about 1-3/4" of top face with aluminum. I plan to do as Don is suggesting and place something rubber or plastic between the aluminum and the frame, as well as setting it in a bed of vulkem. I extended the pan past the door jamb edge about 2" on either side. I'm planning on running the sheet flooring up to the edge of the step and then capture it with an aluminum angle/threshold so you won't end up seeing the pan edge. Thanks for creating and updating this thread . . . I certainly benefit from the conversations and experience. If anyone sees a problem with my plan I'd love to hear about it.
Thanks, MarkR

Aerowood 09-24-2008 08:51 PM

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This is what I did. What I didn't take was a picture of the vast amount of sealent I put in between the sub floor and aluminum close out panel. I also sealed between the frame and the aluminum panel.

urbanfood 09-24-2008 11:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Aerowood (Post 620337)
This is what I did. What I didn't take was a picture of the vast amount of sealent I put in between the sub floor and aluminum close out panel. I also sealed between the frame and the aluminum panel.

kip, it looks like you didn't use any screws or anything to put down the aluminum on the frame, did you just seal it? what was the sealant?

then you put sealant on top of the aluminum and put the plywood on top of that, yes? (opposed to putting the aluminum on the plywood, then putting the whole thing down.

mark, i like the wrap at the edge, did you have to use a brake for that?

Aerowood 09-25-2008 06:48 AM

When I put the subfloor down, the fasteners go through every thing at one time. The sealant that I,m using is an aircraft fuel tank sealant called PR1440B1/2. It has a shelf life of only 6 months so when it expires at work it is a hazmat to dispose. It is a two part polymer and will still kick off for another year. So I have been saving it up to use on my Globetrotter. I hope I never have to take it apart again because it really sticks. I didn't have to wrap the front edge as my door frame wraps over the subfloor, The aluminum has also been alodined and epoxy primed.

Jim & Susan 09-25-2008 10:34 AM

I did something like what y'all are describing. I just ran a heavy bead of Sikaflex on the frame, then dropped the aluminum sheet down on top of that. That sheet is riveted to a piece of aluminum channel under the doorframe on the '73 model. I don't think it will moving around very much (as in none at all).

Great looking work from all of you guys. Keep it up.

Jim

urbanfood 09-29-2008 02:23 PM

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i have about 3/4 of the subfloor down. ran into a couple of problems of the galvanized metal not adhering to the subfloor (i didn't give it enough time to dry) under the stair step. i'm now actually considering of welding a 1/4" steel plate to cover the stair step and leave that naked or put something else on top of it. i could put an entrance mat inside the trailer to bring it flush with the 3/4" plywood if that makes sense.

here's a couple of pics of the 4 bal jacks i installed. i had to add two new crossmembers specifically to mount these. these bal jacks are GREAT! when i had the subfloor down (dryfit) i could walk on every part of the trailer at it was solid. NOTE. i tried the two just in the back and it was still wobbily near the front. i put two more of front and it is solid, SO anyone who says you don't need them up front because of the tongue jack hasn't tried this, believe me it works. i could have went with the lesser expensive jacks, but i really wanted the bal jacks because i saw them on the newer airstreams and i'm glad i did. they are slick.

Attachment 68511 Attachment 68512

urbanfood 10-25-2008 12:39 AM

finally the shell is still alive!
 
6 Attachment(s)
RELIEF! i've finally finished the plywood subfloor and installed the new channel. i was fortunate to be able to clean up and reuse the four corner channel pieces. i then installed new channel that i had a sheet metal guy make.

i secured the channel to the subfloor/frame with a combination of 1/4" hex bolts/fender washers and sheet metal screws (they's probaby 6" apart at the most). i used a product to lock the nuts on the thread called thread lock, a little red bottle sold at home depot.

you'll notice i used silkaflex between the channel and washers, the only reason being to give some separation between the aluminum channel and zinc washers to prevent corrosion (it would be only a slight reaction if they were in contact).

Attachment 70185 Attachment 70179

Attachment 70181 Attachment 70182

and then put the shell back on today (still needs to be lowered et all). i read about guys doing this by themselves, my hats off to you. it took six of us to move this thing and place it, the crossbracing probably weighs more than the shell.

Attachment 70183 Attachment 70184

3Ms75Argosy 10-25-2008 01:03 AM

Wow! The shell's almost landed! Can't wait to see the "marriage." So, with the 50's, do you need to put the belly on first and tuck it in under the shell prior to lowering? Or can you do it later.
Marc

urbanfood 10-25-2008 03:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3Ms75Argosy (Post 631092)
Wow! The shell's almost landed! Can't wait to see the "marriage." So, with the 50's, do you need to put the belly on first and tuck it in under the shell prior to lowering? Or can you do it later.
Marc

yes, they were smart in the 50's the skin lays on top of the bellypan so no water can get in below, the same concept when installing flashing above a window.

so i can lower the shell, then slip the belly pan up inside.

whitsend 10-26-2008 07:01 PM

David - re your BAL stabilizers - are they screwed into the new subflooring or welded to the new cross members you mentioned?
Thanks - I love your thread!! I'll be doing a '54 Cruiser soon'ish and have learned sooo much here.
Jim


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