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-   -   F-250 or F-350 (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f463/f-250-or-f-350-a-198456.html)

olgoat 07-20-2019 04:27 PM

F-250 or F-350
 
I am in the market for a new Super Duty, upgrading from an F-150. I have driven four or five F-250's and think I have a pretty good feel for the difference in ride quality between the F-150 and F-250. Up to this point I chose not to even look at F-350's because I thought they were only available with an 8' bed. I just learned yesterday that F-350's, although rare, are available with short wheel base. Test drove a short wheel base F-350 today, mixed highway and rough Houston TX city streets, and didn't notice much difference between the F-250 and F-350.

Anyway, does anyone have real world experience moving from an F-250 to an F-350 as a daily driver and how much degradation in ride quality did you see?

The payload improvement is significant about 3,400 pounds for the F-350 vs 2,100 pounds for the F-250 with the equipment we want.

I know it would tow better as a long wheel base, but it will also be a daily driver so I am going to stick with a short wheelbase truck.

Thanks for your input.

pjshier 07-20-2019 05:07 PM

not 250-350, but 150-350
 
Our increment was F150 to F350 for payload reasons. Mitigated the stiffer-tho-not-deadly ride of the F350 with Rancho adjustable shocks, Sulastic spring hangars in the rear, and airing down the tires when unladen. With the Leer topper, the ride is very acceptable. Not as nice as the F150 Platinum, however.

JonDNC 07-20-2019 06:13 PM

We just bought a F 350 short bed FX4 Platinum. Came from a Sierra AT4. We test drove 250 and 350s back to back and could not tell the ride difference. Same level of trim on both. For the minimal cost delta 350 made sense to us.

Had it a few days and happy so far. Only gotcha is truck is much higher than out Sierra was with a 2” lift. Requires a new longer shank for our Blue Ox.

uraljohn 07-20-2019 06:14 PM

Sulastic Shackles
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by pjshier (Post 2266764)
Our increment was F150 to F350 for payload reasons. Mitigated the stiffer-tho-not-deadly ride of the F350 with Rancho adjustable shocks, Sulastic spring hangars in the rear, and airing down the tires when unladen. With the Leer topper, the ride is very acceptable. Not as nice as the F150 Platinum, however.

I second the "Sulastic Shackles". I installed a set on my 2013 E150 XLT van. This van has a 8600LB GVW rating and the rear axle is rated at 5120 LBS. Made for a pretty stiff ride when empty. "Sulastics" really made a big difference.

Anyone that has a F250/350 should take at look at these. Cost was $400.00 and worth it. Took me less than an hour to install in my driveway with jack stands and regular (no air tools) tools.

There are a couple of videos on youtube showing install. Easy stuff.

CRH 07-20-2019 08:06 PM

I have a gas F350 with both snowplow springs and slide in camper certification. Payload is over 4k. I have no complaints about ride either empty or with the AS on the hitch.

CWSWine 07-20-2019 08:19 PM

My Great Great Grandfather came across the USA in months not days in a covered wagon with wood wheels and not much of a suspension system. Today we have gotten so soft that a ride in an air-conditioning Super Duty is too much for us to handle in daily commutes. I'm not exempting myself since I purchased a GMC 3500 because it rode better than F350 and Ram 2500 over other 3/4 ton trucks because of the ride.

uncle_bob 07-21-2019 09:32 AM

Hi

You can get a F-250 Platinum with a payload of a 2,952 pounds on the door sticker. That's with the camper and snow plow packages on it. The next bump up is a 350 for not much more money (less than $2K if I remember correctly). You get another leaf in the rear springs, but not much else. Indeed you *can* add more packages to the 350 from that starting level and take it up quite a bit from there.

Ride wise, that F-250 and the "simple" F-350 didn't really feel all that different to me. A whole lot of things between the two are same / same so it is not the big leap going to a 450 is ride or handling wise.

Bob

gypsydad 07-21-2019 10:44 AM

Agree with UB; not much difference in ride, but the extra leaf spring if you need the extra payload, adds a lot more support. Not much difference in price either...guess the question for you is, what are you planning to haul and will you require more than 2200# payload? If so, get the F350 and enjoy! :cool:

We got the KR F250 model with 6.7L diesel, and my only dings are as a daily driver, it is expensive for fuel in some states (MT diesel is cheaper than regular!), oil changes and fuel filter changes are expensive ($105 for oil service and $118 for fuel filter), plus not the easiest to maneuver in parking lots...I get 13-14 mpg at 65mph when towing now, and 17 around town.

While pulling our AS, it is great! Braking, power, and handling our 28' the diesel is great! Make sure to get the step in the tailgate.:flowers:

AlanMcD 07-21-2019 04:17 PM

I went with the F250 gas because it has 3,200 pounds of payload vs. the same truck in an F250 Diesel with only 2,100 pounds, not much more than a F150. Plus the tow capacity on my F250 is fine for my trailer. For that matter most trucks are but most lack in payload. If you want the killer high tow capacity AND payload (~4,000) then the F350 is the way to go.

JonDNC 07-21-2019 05:33 PM

My suggestion when you shop is to compare between 250/350 make sure you compare the exact same spec to understand the ride difference and cost difference. The options can radically influence pricing. I.e. a fully loaded Lariat with additional options can rapidly approach the cost of a Limited.

davidrrand 07-21-2019 10:52 PM

I am planning on upgrading next year with the new model Super Duty from my current F150 Lariat V8. Once the numbers are available on the new 7.3 V8 and I get a feel for fuel economy and any reliability issues, hopefully by next spring, I will choose between the 6.2 and the 7.3 gas engines with 10 spd trans. Several notable upgrade from 2019 to 2020.

Dave

Cirrusaly 07-22-2019 12:21 AM

Made the change from short bed SRW F-250 to short bed SRW F-350 last year, solely because of payload difference. Both diesel. Put 50K on the F-250. Have 21K on the F-350. Both stock; no suspension mods to either.

I detect very little “ride” difference. I like both.

Good luck!

olgoat 07-22-2019 06:08 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cirrusaly (Post 2267242)
Made the change from short bed SRW F-250 to short bed SRW F-350 last year, solely because of payload difference. Both diesel. Put 50K on the F-250. Have 21K on the F-350. Both stock; no suspension mods to either.

I detect very little “ride” difference. I like both.

Good luck!



Good info, thanks.

graysailor 07-22-2019 06:32 AM

I have a Lariat F250 with no complaints. If I were to do it over I would go for the F-350 just because of the greatly improved payload. There is a very small price increase. Remember the hight the package the less payload you get.

dumbclub 07-22-2019 06:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by graysailor (Post 2267278)
Remember the hight the package the less payload you get.

Obviously, there’s a miscue here, but I can’t figure out what you intended to say for “hight”.
Please give it another shot.

CRH 07-22-2019 07:19 PM

He means higher trim level. A truck with a lot of options will have a lower payload than a stripped down model.

rjmaype 07-22-2019 07:25 PM

Remember:
"You can never have too much truck.
Many times you may find yourself without enough truck.
But you can never have too much truck."


From an old timer who convinced me to buy the F350

davidrrand 07-23-2019 08:14 AM

I agree. If you go diesel get, buy the 350. Many diesel 250/2500s only have a hundred or more pounds of payload than my current 15 Lariat 150 4x4 SCab V8 with 2031 lbs. My previous truck was a ‘99 F350 diesel SCab with 6 speed manual and I loved it. The wife, not so much. Noisy and rough riding but durable and good economy. Don’t make em like that any more but new ones are very nice and twice as capable and twice the $$ too��

JonDNC 07-23-2019 09:06 AM

The new Diesels are much quieter and civilized, we took ours,out last weekend putting on some miles and wife’s comment at the end of the day was more comfortable than our Sierra AT4.

mikeinca 07-23-2019 05:36 PM

Something was brought up briefly in another recent thread and since my questions about it wouldn't have exactly been on topic I didn't want to hijack that discussion. This thread seems like a better place to get some responses from the forum.

To the point, it's been said a few times that "you can't have too much truck" but is that really true? The comment made in the other thread was that a TV that's too stiffly sprung for the task can beat up the trailer resulting in stuff like popped rivets, cabinets flying open while travelling, additional stress on the frame, etc. I know that those kinds of problems can occur with a poorly matched hitch but it seems reasonable that they could also be associated with a poorly matched tow vehicle.

Obviously it depends greatly on individual requirements, but I'm just wondering if the question of F250 versus F350 is really so completely cut and dried. For example, after accounting for all of the fixed payload requirements like tongue weight, hitch, and passengers my 2017 F250 high trim level diesel with max tow has 550 lbs or so of spare payload capacity. Since I typically carry a couple of hundred pounds of gear in the bed of the truck, this leaves me a significant payload margin. Given that all the other attributes of the F250 are more than up to the task of towing my 30' Classic what would be the advantage of a one ton truck in a situation like mine? And isn't it possible that I'm doing my trailer a favor by not towing with a more stiffly sprung TV than I need? Or not.

Thoughts?

turk123 07-24-2019 06:35 AM

This is kind of an experiment, but I am adding an Add-a-leaf to my 2017 ford F-250 Platinum diesel to increase the payload margin. I have no plans to go beyond the "sticker" on the door (2086 lb.) but my thinking is a more stable ride with my 30' Classic.

I have another thread talking more about this and the predicament I am in with payload. That said, the F-350 would have been a better choice for me. The added leaf will allow 1100 lbs. more payload (not legally as the sticker still stands as the limit) and should give me the same stability that the F-350 has. The F-350 essentially is a 250 with an added leaf. My Ford dealer said they would install my third party leaf for under $200. They have no problem with this.

I am also going to add a Suilastic shock for the rear leaf springs. My concern is the more "stiffer" ride and removing some of this stiffness transferred to the trailer. I have also added a rear stabilizer bar (ford) to the 250.

I would say if you are thinking about a 250 diesel, make sure your trim level gives you enough payload. I added an A.R.E. cap (200 lbs.) and a Bedslide (190). Add the propride hitch, trailer, Thule and roof rack, people, big dog, cooler, grill, bikes, tools, rug, and your payload is used up. The 350 gives you a good 1000 lbs. of margin.

Eagle Keeper 07-24-2019 07:10 AM

I was in the same situation. I decided that the 350 is the way to go for the additional payload. There is no real difference in ride quality, I previously owned a 250 so I have experience here. My payload sticker says 3393, it’s a loaded Lariat. I have more options than my friends Platinum! It tows extremely well.

uncle_bob 07-24-2019 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeinca (Post 2267922)
.....

To the point, it's been said a few times that "you can't have too much truck" but is that really true? The comment made in the other thread was that a TV that's too stiffly sprung for the task can beat up the trailer resulting in stuff like popped rivets, cabinets flying open while travelling, additional stress on the frame, etc. I know that those kinds of problems can occur with a poorly matched hitch but it seems reasonable that they could also be associated with a poorly matched tow vehicle.

......

Thoughts?

Hi

Given the way an AS hooks up to the TV, there *is* flex between the two. It's not a 5th wheel. In order for the truck to to crazy stuff *to* the trailer you would need a pretty stiff linkage. With a heavier truck, there is less need for a lot of WD on your hitch. That means a *softer* linkage rather than a stiffer one (at least with most systems).

Bob

gypsydad 07-25-2019 02:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turk123 (Post 2268032)
This is kind of an experiment, but I am adding an Add-a-leaf to my 2017 ford F-250 Platinum diesel to increase the payload margin. I have no plans to go beyond the "sticker" on the door (2086 lb.) but my thinking is a more stable ride with my 30' Classic.

I have another thread talking more about this and the predicament I am in with payload. That said, the F-350 would have been a better choice for me. The added leaf will allow 1100 lbs. more payload (not legally as the sticker still stands as the limit) and should give me the same stability that the F-350 has. The F-350 essentially is a 250 with an added leaf. My Ford dealer said they would install my third party leaf for under $200. They have no problem with this.

I am also going to add a Suilastic shock for the rear leaf springs. My concern is the more "stiffer" ride and removing some of this stiffness transferred to the trailer. I have also added a rear stabilizer bar (ford) to the 250.

I would say if you are thinking about a 250 diesel, make sure your trim level gives you enough payload. I added an A.R.E. cap (200 lbs.) and a Bedslide (190). Add the propride hitch, trailer, Thule and roof rack, people, big dog, cooler, grill, bikes, tools, rug, and your payload is used up. The 350 gives you a good 1000 lbs. of margin.

Interested in your ride review when you get this all done...I am looking at the Bilstines on mine, but dealer told me this past week, he wouldn't change till the Rancho's need replacement...he said mine are fine while I was in for service. 60K now on my 2017 F250...Not sure if I will go for the topper or not for our Alaska trip next spring...lots of plus's for having a topper; more room for secure storage and kayaks on top, etc...if I go that route, I likely could also use the extra spring to be safe...:cool:

mikeinca 07-25-2019 03:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gypsydad (Post 2268702)
Interested in your ride review when you get this all done...I am looking at the Bilstines on mine, but dealer told me this past week, he wouldn't change till the Rancho's need replacement...he said mine are fine while I was in for service. 60K now on my 2017 F250...

I know your post was directed at turk123 but just thought I'd chime in on the Bilstein series 4600 shocks. My 2017 F250 suspension felt under-controlled on rough roads even when unladen and I had some porpoising when towing; not bad but noticeable. I replaced the front and rear OEM shocks with the Bilsteins even though my truck only had 10K miles on it.

I'm extremely happy with the result. The ride is more composed on rough pavement and on our recent 3000 mile trip after the upgrade I didn't experience porpoising even once. Definitely an upgrade over stock.

turk123 07-25-2019 06:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeinca (Post 2268732)
I know your post was directed at turk123 but just thought I'd chime in on the Bilstein series 4600 shocks. My 2017 F250 suspension felt under-controlled on rough roads even when unladen and I had some porpoising when towing; not bad but noticeable. I replaced the front and rear OEM shocks with the Bilsteins even though my truck only had 10K miles on it.

I'm extremely happy with the result. The ride is more composed on rough pavement and on our recent 3000 mile trip after the upgrade I didn't experience porpoising even once. Definitely an upgrade over stock.

I did the same thing. If you want to wait for the Rancho's (actual ford with Rancho's label) to go bad before you install new shocks, you won't wait too long. Mine were gone at 25,000 miles. Bilsteins all around. Billstein now makes a shock for the rear on 2017 and up F-250/350's with no modifications.

Ride is definitely improved. Don't forget the steering damping shock. Mine was leaking and caused a death wobble!!!

gypsydad 07-26-2019 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turk123 (Post 2268768)
I did the same thing. If you want to wait for the Rancho's (actual ford with Rancho's label) to go bad before you install new shocks, you won't wait too long. Mine were gone at 25,000 miles. Bilsteins all around. Billstein now makes a shock for the rear on 2017 and up F-250/350's with no modifications.

Ride is definitely improved. Don't forget the steering damping shock. Mine was leaking and caused a death wobble!!!

Tell me more about the "death wobble"! Not sure I knew about that?

gypsydad 07-26-2019 10:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeinca (Post 2268732)
I know your post was directed at turk123 but just thought I'd chime in on the Bilstein series 4600 shocks. My 2017 F250 suspension felt under-controlled on rough roads even when unladen and I had some porpoising when towing; not bad but noticeable. I replaced the front and rear OEM shocks with the Bilsteins even though my truck only had 10K miles on it.

I'm extremely happy with the result. The ride is more composed on rough pavement and on our recent 3000 mile trip after the upgrade I didn't experience porpoising even once. Definitely an upgrade over stock.

Thanks for the input! Guess I should order on Amazon and get these going then!:cool:

turk123 07-26-2019 09:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gypsydad (Post 2268980)
Tell me more about the "death wobble"! Not sure I knew about that?



The stabilizer shock went bad and was leaking. A death wobble is when your front steering shakes back and forth as your front wheels are caught in a back and forth oscillation! It is scary and you have to slow down and pull over!

mikeinca 07-26-2019 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turk123 (Post 2269313)
The stabilizer shock went bad and was leaking. A death wobble is when your front steering shakes back and forth as your front wheels are caught in a back and forth oscillation! It is scary and you have to slow down and pull over!

Haven't had an issue with mine yet. Hopefully they replaced it for you under warranty and didn't try to say it was a "wear item".

turk123 07-27-2019 06:01 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeinca (Post 2269326)
Haven't had an issue with mine yet. Hopefully they replaced it for you under warranty and didn't try to say it was a "wear item".

They did.

r carl 07-27-2019 06:16 AM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P-_etnN_q1M

DewTheDew 07-28-2019 04:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeinca (Post 2267922)
Something was brought up briefly in another recent thread and since my questions about it wouldn't have exactly been on topic I didn't want to hijack that discussion. This thread seems like a better place to get some responses from the forum.

To the point, it's been said a few times that "you can't have too much truck" but is that really true? The comment made in the other thread was that a TV that's too stiffly sprung for the task can beat up the trailer resulting in stuff like popped rivets, cabinets flying open while travelling, additional stress on the frame, etc. I know that those kinds of problems can occur with a poorly matched hitch but it seems reasonable that they could also be associated with a poorly matched tow vehicle.

Obviously it depends greatly on individual requirements, but I'm just wondering if the question of F250 versus F350 is really so completely cut and dried. For example, after accounting for all of the fixed payload requirements like tongue weight, hitch, and passengers my 2017 F250 high trim level diesel with max tow has 550 lbs or so of spare payload capacity. Since I typically carry a couple of hundred pounds of gear in the bed of the truck, this leaves me a significant payload margin. Given that all the other attributes of the F250 are more than up to the task of towing my 30' Classic what would be the advantage of a one ton truck in a situation like mine? And isn't it possible that I'm doing my trailer a favor by not towing with a more stiffly sprung TV than I need? Or not.

Thoughts?

My view (in addition to the other comments) is basically that you can always soften the ride with something like an air hitch but you cannot easily add capability if you want to add payload above what is stock. Maybe next year you decide you want a Quad bike or add a couple of kayaks and bikes. Or you add a topper. Or you get a generator as you decide to boondock. But then again, I am a fan of flexibility. My current situation calls for an F150 (which is adequate but after two years I already feel the need for more payload) but in a few years we will get either a 3/4 or 1 ton.

Rgentum 07-28-2019 06:46 PM

I put 30K miles on our 2015 Ram/Cummins 2500 and had the opportunity to trade it in on a 2018 Ram/Cummins 3500. I've now put 7K miles towing on the 3500. I can't tell any difference in the ride between the two of them.

mikeinca 07-28-2019 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by DewTheDew (Post 2270060)
My view (in addition to the other comments) is basically that you can always soften the ride with something like an air hitch but you cannot easily add capability if you want to add payload above what is stock. Maybe next year you decide you want a Quad bike or add a couple of kayaks and bikes. Or you add a topper. Or you get a generator as you decide to boondock. But then again, I am a fan of flexibility. My current situation calls for an F150 (which is adequate but after two years I already feel the need for more payload) but in a few years we will get either a 3/4 or 1 ton.

Good points about flexibility. In my case, I have all the gear I can foreseeably need for boondocking or whatever and I have ample payload capacity left over with a 3/4 ton. But if there is truly no penalty to be paid for getting the 1 ton, then one would be silly not to consider it.

I won't be in the market for a new truck for quite while but when the time comes I'll just have to do some critical comparison testing between a 1 ton and 3/4 ton for myself. My problem is that I know that per the specs the F350 has more springs and they are higher rate than the F250. From my experience with suspension tuning I'm having a hard time with the idea that Ford could somehow have greatly increased payload with a stiffer suspension on two trucks that are otherwise identical design-wise, yet not affect ride quality at all. Seems like magic!

Anyway, I appreciate the subjective opinions on the subject. Maybe I'll try a 1 ton and discover it's not as noticeably different as it would seem on paper.

turk123 07-28-2019 08:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikeinca (Post 2270140)
Good points about flexibility. In my case, I have all the gear I can foreseeably need for boondocking or whatever and I have ample payload capacity left over with a 3/4 ton. But if there is truly no penalty to be paid for getting the 1 ton, then one would be silly not to consider it.

I won't be in the market for a new truck for quite while but when the time comes I'll just have to do some critical comparison testing between a 1 ton and 3/4 ton for myself. My problem is that I know that per the specs the F350 has more springs and they are higher rate than the F250. From my experience with suspension tuning I'm having a hard time with the idea that Ford could somehow have greatly increased payload with a stiffer suspension on two trucks that are otherwise identical design-wise, yet not affect ride quality at all. Seems like magic!

Anyway, I appreciate the subjective opinions on the subject. Maybe I'll try a 1 ton and discover it's not as noticeably different as it would seem on paper.

Next year . . . F-350 or f-450? I actually looked at a 450 the other day. The biggest plus of the 450 is the wide front end and incredible turning radius. Worth the price of admission! :lol::lol::lol:

https://youtu.be/jGuEJEyvDtY

sparkymark 08-18-2019 01:41 PM

1 Attachment(s)
2018 F350, always go with bigger payload. Love mine!Attachment 349803

DewTheDew 08-23-2019 06:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sparkymark (Post 2278469)
2018 F350, always go with bigger payload. Love mine!Attachment 349803

Love the blacked out chrome!

ISUboy 08-30-2019 07:32 AM

My 2018 6.2 Lariat rides pretty good with my tires at 55 front, 60 rear. My TW is 1100 lbs, and according to the Michelin weight charts, that pressure is still way more capacity than the tires need. The payload on the gasser is 3116. Pulling an AS or almost any TT, not sure why anyone would need more than that. My TT is 8400 lbs and it accelerates up hills. Sure it uses 4th gear at nearly 4k rpm, but that's where the torque is And how they work. Nothing wrong with it. I wouldnt have any issue with 10k on the hitch of my 250 and would probably go to 12k if it was a 5vr. All without the diesel penalties. If I had a 12k and up 5ver, it would be a diesel f350 for sure.


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