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-   -   Almost ashamed to ask > Antenna? (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f451/almost-ashamed-to-ask-antenna-195399.html)

kittmaster 05-08-2019 12:56 PM

Almost ashamed to ask > Antenna?
 
1 Attachment(s)
I've been so focused on getting my cable/matrix and AS connect running that I realized that there is an additional antenna on the roof. I saw it during the build on the factory tour and thought.......cool!

My first thoughts are that it goes to the white panel with the booster switch....but my question is.......if so....why? If not, then why?

Aren't all TV signals OTA now digital and require decoding boxes to receive them?

Maybe I missed something, can someone lay it out what the purpose of the attached antenna is used for? And how to access it?

And yes, I am hanging my head in shame just for asking... :unsure:

n2916s 05-08-2019 02:25 PM

Yep, solid state tv antenna. Yes, the signals have been digital for a long time and I bet the tv's in a 2019 are decidedly digital. Free HD tv!

kittmaster 05-08-2019 02:43 PM

So where does it route too....the booster panel?

Mollysdad 05-08-2019 04:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kittmaster (Post 2239448)
So where does it route too....the booster panel?

Yes.
BTW, there is no such thing as a digital antenna. It's marketing. Antennas are antennas, they are tuned to certain frequencies (or a range) and spit it out at the other end.

You have an antenna booster between the antenna and TV. If using the "cable" input on the side, turn the booster off. (I had to learn)

vswingfield 05-08-2019 07:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kittmaster (Post 2239421)
...

Aren't all TV signals OTA now digital and require decoding boxes to receive them?

...

It's been years since any TVs were made without digital tuners built-in. The decoding boxes were a stopgap measure for older televisions. Analog broadcasts officially ceased in 2009.


Of course, if you still have an old Cathode Ray tube (CRT) television, you could still use a decoding box, if you could find one. ;)


Many stations use the additional channels available to put up channels with alternate content that you don't get on satellite systems. Often they show older shows available inexpensively to the broadcasters. They don't require the latest HD equipment since they were made for analog, allowing broadcasters to gather some revenue from out of date equipment (low resolution "HD" equipment). For example, MeTV here in Little Rock broadcasts on channels 18.8 and 49. At 10:00pm, Carol Burnett highlights are on for 30 minutes, followed by Perry Mason, The Twilight Zone, and two Alfred Hitchcock episodes.


Enjoy your new Airstream! :)

SteveSueMac 05-08-2019 08:01 PM

Why be ashamed to ask? No one is born knowing intrinsically all things RV antennae [emoji3]

I believe the power button just amplifies the antenna’s ability to receive OTA signals which I believe are broadcast over the old UHF band.

Use the power switch for the antenna when you want to use OTA channels. Shut the power to the antenna off when using cable because it makes the tv “snowy”.

Decoders are, I believe, built in to modern TVs.

Hope that helps. Never be ashamed to ask! [emoji3]

bweybright 05-08-2019 10:02 PM

Your picture is very interesting to me. I have a 2007 and bought the antenna you show mounted to replace my older batwing antenna. Except that using the antenna you show is 1 1/2 inches below the same AC unit you have so I can't mount mine to get the rotation clearance needed.

So my question is: Does Airstream have a block they are mounting under you antenna to get the AC clearance?
I know I can buy (I have it) the after market to fit on the batwing bracket..but it does not sit well in the existing cradle and all. So I am trying to make life easier/lazier for me..... Plus I like the integrated signal scan feature.

Anyone with insight into this dilemma would be a savior!!
Bob

kittmaster 05-09-2019 06:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveSueMac (Post 2239546)
Why be ashamed to ask? No one is born knowing intrinsically all things RV antennae [emoji3]

I believe the power button just amplifies the antenna’s ability to receive OTA signals which I believe are broadcast over the old UHF band.

Use the power switch for the antenna when you want to use OTA channels. Shut the power to the antenna off when using cable because it makes the tv “snowy”.

Decoders are, I believe, built in to modern TVs.

Hope that helps. Never be ashamed to ask! [emoji3]

Well I typically have a very wide understanding of most things Electrical/Electronic being in audio/automotive/semiconductor for decades.

The Airstream and the way things are "done" are a new animal (to me) and for the most part have most of it locked down (generator, inverters, etc.).

Thing is, I've had cable/satellite for all of my life and haven't done OTA stuff and quite frankly haven't even looked at it since the digital box rollout (and I still have like 3 of them in cobwebs...LOL) when analog TV went away....so when I realized the antenna.....I was like.....HMM.....

I am aware that most LCD TVs have digital signal decoding tuners, but my experience with Cox has told me and showed me even with the Airstream that cable box is required to decode even the standard channels......so that lead me to.....what is the is antenna for then??...(so a bit embarrassing for not knowing..IMO).... LOL.

I guess now it makes sense that the TV IS the OTA box, to use with the antenna, with the booster on to received the now "digital" channels that are OTA.

It's coming together......:lol::lol::lol:

Mansderm161 05-09-2019 06:44 AM

Thank you. I learned from your question! No such thing as a "stupid question"! This forum is such a blessing!

kittmaster 05-09-2019 06:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mansderm161 (Post 2239667)
This forum is such a blessing!

Yes, yes it is...... :)

Lots of smart/experienced people here.... learning something new everyday!

aftermath 05-09-2019 08:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kittmaster (Post 2239665)
...

I am aware that most LCD TVs have digital signal decoding tuners, but my experience with Cox has told me and showed me even with the Airstream that cable box is required to decode even the standard channels......


Cox, as in Cox Cable? In my area it is now Xfinity and I have one of those love/hate relationships with them. Our home is cabled and many years ago I could turn on the tv and get the basic channels. If you wanted more you had to purchase their service box. As time moved on, Cox decided they didn't want anyone to get anything free so they made the box a requirement.
Receiving "over the air" signals has nothing to do with Cox, Xfinity or any other cable service provider. You simply run the antenna up, turn on the tv and you will get local channels. I have the old version batwing antenna hooked up to a newer Samsung tv and the image I get parked in front of my house is every bit as good as the one I get inside via the cable.


You should be good to go with your newer tv. My only question is what kind of reception you will get from that antenna that sits below your AC. I have also heard, rumors perhaps, that the new omnidirectional antennas are not as efficient as some of the older ones.

SteveSueMac 05-09-2019 09:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by aftermath (Post 2239728)

...snip...
Receiving "over the air" signals has nothing to do with Cox, Xfinity or any other cable service provider. You simply run the antenna up, turn on the tv and you will get local channels. I have the old version batwing antenna hooked up to a newer Samsung tv and the image I get parked in front of my house is every bit as good as the one I get inside via the cable.



In my case, the Xfinity cable box limited the output to 720p. OTA is in 1080p so my air antenna channels look better than what I was getting through cable. We added a Roku and all that comes in at 1080p as well. Much better experience - lower cost - but still stuck w/Xfinity for the Internet access.....I hate cable [emoji35]

cazual6 05-09-2019 10:11 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SteveSueMac (Post 2239546)
Why be ashamed to ask? No one is born knowing intrinsically all things RV antennae [emoji3]

I believe the power button just amplifies the antenna’s ability to receive OTA signals which I believe are broadcast over the old UHF band.

Use the power switch for the antenna when you want to use OTA channels. Shut the power to the antenna off when using cable because it makes the tv “snowy”.

Decoders are, I believe, built in to modern TVs.

Hope that helps. Never be ashamed to ask! [emoji3]

I concur

rustyoldman 05-09-2019 10:46 AM

As of January 1, 2019 tv signals are no longer scrambled by new federal law. With a good antennae you should be able to get many channels and if you add to that a streaming device like Roku. You can get just about anything you might want if you have a wi-fi signal.

rustyoldman 05-09-2019 10:52 AM

Many campgrounds now have wifi and if you install a wifi booster antennae (not cheap), you should easily get any wifi signal in the campground and if you stop overnight near a Walmart Cabelas or Bass Pro Shop, you should be able to pick up their signal.

uncle_bob 05-15-2019 09:18 AM

Hi

We have stayed in *many* campgrounds that have WiFi. If we ever get to one that has good enough WiFi to actually be usable for streaming video .... I'll stop by your place with a case of beer to tell you about it :). Streaming video off of the AT&T Hotspot in the trailer - that works pretty well.

Over the air TV wise, if you are out in a typical rural campground one decent station is about what you can expect. That station may have multiple feeds on it, but it's still only one station. In a location near a big city, indeed you may have a number of stations. Each one likely will have several feeds on it. The value of those additional feeds is (at least to me) very limited .... I got my fill of 1960's TV reruns *long* ago.

Bob

Laurai 05-15-2019 09:43 AM

yep
 
Just be sure the green light (booster) is on when trying to use OTA -- BUT green light has to be off when using cable from a CG. Either way for satellite.

My hubby watches his satellite and I watch OTA in the bedroom with TV set on source TV. Nice, but the new design of antennas that are rather "squat" don't get very far for reception. I'd love to find one that reaches into the air again like the old days.

M. Smith 05-15-2019 03:56 PM

Not only push the antenna booster on, but also go to the menu on your tv and select antenna and then scan for stations.

kittmaster 05-18-2019 06:47 AM

We are on OTA now at the state park we are in (no cable hookups). Managed to catch a lot of channels and is surprisingly clear and well defined HD OTA.

It is amazing how far things have come....I've always had cable and satellite for channels that are not OTA that the wife wants etc etc....so this "blast to the past" OTA changes are like kind of like doing it the old way.....except no rabbit ears to adjust....LOL!!

rmkrum 05-18-2019 08:44 AM

Yup. Even our old-style ‘batwing’ crank-up antenna works well....as long as I remember to scan for channels every time we move...

uncle_bob 05-19-2019 05:54 AM

Hi

The park up on the top of the mountain or the one with all the suburbs built up around it likely will do fine for OTA. Pull into one that's in a valley or on the "other side" of the mountain and ... not so much. The "new" signals actually have less range than the one ones did. It's part of the same process that lets the stations send you multiple feeds.

Bob

blkmagikca 05-19-2019 06:52 AM

The signal amplifier has been installed in AS's for some time now. My 1987 Excella has an amplifier built in in the cabinet under the television, and it has a 12-volt DC outlet as well.

The batwing antenna is a good directional antenna, and the old ones can be updated with additional UHF elements, which just clip on. Using the Android app "DTV Antennas", you can quickly position the antenna to get a decent signal.

I also have the Roku stick. However, using it quickly consumes my allocated Verizon data. OTOH, I still have the "Cantenna" which is great for pirating wi-fi. Back in 2006 I was having some repairs done to my '94 AS LY moho at a remote shop near St Thomas ON. I spent the night parked outside that shop, and noticed a distant farmhouse (about 1 mile away). I set up the Cantenna and pointed it at the the farmhouse - bingo! I was able to get my email.


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