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-   -   Airstream 25RB with 1300 Pounds of Payload on TV? (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f238/airstream-25rb-with-1300-pounds-of-payload-on-tv-195361.html)

cru-in 05-10-2019 04:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jobjar (Post 2240016)
Just read your post this morning and here is some more stuff for your consideration.

We travel with a 2019 FC FB twin and a 2019 Ram 1500 2 WD Quad cab equipped with the 5.7 etorque, tow package and 3.93 gears. TV was selected because of being a 4 door, would fit in our garage, is our only vehicle and is used daily and with a Propride setup for towing.

We have traveled almost 4K miles with this combo, including a trip thru the Smokies and are very pleased with the this set up especially with the down hill engine/trans braking effect. (7% grade)

Now here are some numbers to take a look at and maybe compare with what you have in mind.

As a side observation, our previous TT was a FC 23FB pulled with a V6 Durango. The 23 just was not working out for us as to comfort, use, and many other reasons. In our opinion the 25 is a significant improvement is use and enjoyment.

Best of luck with whatever way you go and just enjoy life.

Wow. Thanks. This is an amazingly helpful post. It allows me to, using your numbers, make slight adjustment for our 2019 Ram 1500, and get a reasonable estimate of where we would be.

Putting your post together took time. Time you could have spent doing something else rather than helping some stranger (me) out. This thread would restore a skeptics faith in humanity. You and others have helped me out (a stranger) with your time, opinions, and wisdom.

Thanks Tons To All!

Dan

cru-in 05-10-2019 05:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thewarden (Post 2240046)
Interestingly, the published hitch weight of the 25 RB is higher than the 25 FB, 886lbs vs 833lbs. The published hitch weight of the 27FB is actually less than the 25s, 770 lbs. Of course, real world numbers are quite different, and usually quite a bit more but its all relative.

Humm, double checked the Airstream site (as well as window stickers on 25RB) and it shows 835 pounds for the 25RB twin. Also shows the 25FB Twin as 837. Both basically the same.

The 26RB is close to 900 pounds

I also see the 27FB is 790.

cru-in 05-10-2019 05:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SecondFloor (Post 2239942)
We love our 2019 Ram 1500 Limited, and we tow our 27FB with it. We have put on over 18,000 miles towing on this combination so far, as we started full timing in September 2018. The eTorque Hemi provides loads of power, and we can go as fast as wish up grades - but normally we keep it at 55-60mph. On grades down - even 8% ones - we just set cruise on the truck to our desired speed, and the 8 speed transmission downshifts as necessary to keep us at that speed. We never touch the brakes, which is a big relief.

Our door listed payload is 1267#, and I do wish it was more, maybe just to make me feel better. CAT scales show I am over a little on weight. Attached are scans of our CAT scale slips and a worksheet I use to try to figure out where I am at. We weighed the Ram alone, with the 27FB attached and no weight distribution, and with weight distribution engaged on the 10th link. The worksheet is my attempt to sort things out.

FYI, we have 700W of solar on the roof, and replaced the original batteries with 400Ah lithium under the bed. We also have installed an aluminum rolling bed cover that is strong enough to support 500lbs.

For a hitch, we are using a BlueOx, but with 1500# bars. I initially thought I would need only 1000# bars, but the dealer recommended the 1500#. I am glad I have them, as I need to transfer a lot of weight via wd. The truck drives great with everything dialed in (10th link), so I am pretty satisfied with the setup.

In summary, we think the new Ram 1500 makes a great TV for up to a 27FB from our experience. The truck seems very capable to tow this size trailer, and we never had any "white knuckle moments." Plus, when not attached, it drives like a luxury SUV, but we still have the bed (5'7") for storage.

I completely understand the reasons to upgrade to a 2500. We may do so ourselves someday. However, I am posting this to let you and others know that the new Ram 1500 can do the job well, and seems to be quite safe and sturdy. Good luck!

Another amazingly helpful post! Thanks so much for taking the time to put this post together. As I said, folks willingness to spend helping a stranger make a decision is a testament to folks good will. Thanks

Your numbers help me improve the fidelity of my model. I will post all our actual once we get the trailer.

Particular helpful in my model was seeing when you engaged the WDH, it moved 580 pounds off the drive axle. Of which 380 went to the steer axle and 160 to the Trailer. Of the 1100 pounds of weight before WDH about 14% was transferred to the TT axle. Given I am considering a 25 (it should have a shorter distance between TT wheels and WDH than your 27) and my truck is a long bed (a foot more between the drive wheels than a short bed) I should see a higher percentage of hitch weight transferred to the TT wheels.

Jobjar 05-11-2019 02:06 PM

I should have mentioned that the weight ticket for the trailer is with a full water tank, empty black and grey tanks and a fridge full of stuff. Do not know if that would be significant for you.

Wishing you the best with your choices.

thewarden 05-11-2019 07:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cru-in (Post 2239376)
found another post that references 800ish pounds on a 25RB:

"I have weighed our tongue 3 times, each time it came out around 880. This is with solar panels, full fresh water, empty black and gray tanks."

My confidence in the realistic TW of around 800 pounds for a loaded 25RB is growing.

Full fresh water is not contributing anything to the TW as the fresh water tank is between the axles.

thewarden 05-11-2019 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cru-in (Post 2240185)
Humm, double checked the Airstream site (as well as window stickers on 25RB) and it shows 835 pounds for the 25RB twin. Also shows the 25FB Twin as 837. Both basically the same.

The 26RB is close to 900 pounds

I also see the 27FB is 790.

The weights I provided come straight from the 2016 Airstream brochure.

cru-in 05-11-2019 07:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by thewarden (Post 2240536)
The weights I provided come straight from the 2016 Airstream brochure.

Oh that explains it. I got them from the 2019 Brochures, 2019 airstream website, and 2019 MSRP trailer pages. For 2019 Models, they all agree with the numbers I posted.

m rafferty 05-15-2019 11:29 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cru-in (Post 2239376)
found another post that references 800ish pounds on a 25RB:

"I have weighed our tongue 3 times, each time it came out around 880. This is with solar panels, full fresh water, empty black and gray tanks."

My confidence in the realistic TW of around 800 pounds for a loaded 25RB is growing.

I have a 2005 FB Safari. My tongue weight loaded is slightly over 1000#
Everything you read here now and previously indicates that most combinations of TV and trailers 25 and over are on the edge of maximum weight for a 1500.
I have towed with both 1500's and 2500's. For peace of mind and much better towing if you don't want to constantly worry about exceeding the limit of a 1500, consider a 2500. If you go with the 23 and you are careful with your weights, you will be fine.

gypsydad 05-15-2019 11:59 AM

Do not use the "brochure specs" on tongue weight; weigh your trailer loaded on the scales with tongue on one scale ,and your 2 axels on the other scale, so you know actual weights of your trailer. Important to know actual data, as your professional experience you mention you have with aircraft should tell you...:angel: Remember, the "payload" weights on your door jam sticker are there as a guide to avoid overloading that particular vehicle...as some folks don't care/don't know/ or just plan ignore. My feeling is it's better to be under than over loaded...for your safety/others safety, and piece of mind.;) Good luck with your 25'! It's a great size trailer!:cool:

ForestStranger 05-15-2019 01:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by cru-in (Post 2239089)
Hi Team,

We have a fully loaded 2019 Ram 1500 (great truck). It has a 3.92 rear, hemi, long bed and a tow rating of north of 10K pounds. With the 3.92, hemi, and a long bed it is a fine towing machine. However, all those nice goodies reduce the payload to 1300 pounds. Nothing is usually loaded in the truck except 300 pounds of passengers and 70 pounds of dog.

To stay comfortably within the payload limits, we are looking at a 23FB and a 23CB. Running the numbers, and reading the posts, these would pretty easily come in under 800 pounds transferred to the TV after WD (plan to use a hensley). Leaving us at least 500 pounds for Me, DW, and Dog

First question: Am I missing anything in reaching the conclusion I could comfortably tow either the 23CB (660 pound TW with propane and batteries) or the 23FB (439 pound TW with propane and batteries)? We would use a hensley Hitch.

Second Question: Reading on this forum that a fully loaded 25RB, running a Hensley hitch, only transferred 800 pounds to the TV. Given the location of the storage and such, it is much less than a 25FB. Is it reasonable to expect I could comfortably tow a properly loaded 25RB?

Thanks in advance for your time and thoughts.
Dan

P.S. I have lots of experience towing RVs, boats, etc. Looking to make sure we have an easy drive and are not fighting the trailer the whole way. Have used and loved the Hensley hitch. :)

We are pulling a 27 FB with an F150 and Propride. I'm at 1,000 tongue weight and with stuff in the truck bed at the Gross Vehicle weight. Being at the limit with a heavy tongue weight causes some porpoising on some roads. Trying to minimize that now with Bilstein shocks. Doing it again I would buy a F250 or GM2500. Then we could get a bigger dog(s).

hshovic 05-15-2019 09:17 PM

TV capacity :|
 
:|



That's all I can think of...


Weighed my 25FB once. 750 lbs on the tongue.


I am a firefighter/emt. In the last six years, I have seen four airstream crashes on the Interstate. All were rollovers/trailers dragging the TV off the road. All were 1/2 ton or less trucks, vans, and suburbans...


So,



I drive a Chevy 2500 with a heavy duty hitch....

:|

gypsydad 05-16-2019 07:39 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hshovic (Post 2241890)
:|



That's all I can think of...


Weighed my 25FB once. 750 lbs on the tongue.


I am a firefighter/emt. In the last six years, I have seen four airstream crashes on the Interstate. All were rollovers/trailers dragging the TV off the road. All were 1/2 ton or less trucks, vans, and suburbans...


So,



I drive a Chevy 2500 with a heavy duty hitch....

:|

Thanks for sharing that data...I agree on the 3/4T for the larger AS's...but, as you know, some folks are "stubborn" in their decisions for TV's...heck, some here still promote not using a WDH (bumper hitch even); or pulling their AS at 80+ MPH, and there are "some" commercial members who will modify just about any small SUV or PU telling the owner "it's safe now" to pull a 25' AS or larger even...what ever floats their boat!:( Only need one accident like you mention to ruin your day....:brows:

ForestStranger 05-16-2019 08:40 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hshovic (Post 2241890)
:|



That's all I can think of...


Weighed my 25FB once. 750 lbs on the tongue.


I am a firefighter/emt. In the last six years, I have seen four airstream crashes on the Interstate. All were rollovers/trailers dragging the TV off the road. All were 1/2 ton or less trucks, vans, and suburbans...


So,



I drive a Chevy 2500 with a heavy duty hitch....

:|

It would be interesting to read the crash investigations on these rollovers.

I've seen testimonies from people who have crashed. Latest was from a guy with a 2500 diesel and Reese hitch. The hitch failed, breaking behind the ball. The rollover crushed the 30' Airstream, flipping the truck on its side. Luckily only minor scrapes to driver and partner and cat.

Agree that weight of tow vehicle vs weight of trailer is critical, as is the connection between the two. Other factors that are just as important - maybe even more important - are speed, trailer gain brake setting and tires. For that reason I tow at 55mph, keep the tires at 80ps, use a tire pressure monitoring system, set trailer gain at medium + 8.5, and use a ProPride to connect my F150 4x4 max tow with a 27' FC Airstream. With the ProPride dialed in, trailer sway from passing vehicles does not occur.

The Ford tow mode setting is amazing technology that controls truck and trailer braking, matched with engine and transmission "braking". Only thing to watch is speed, tires and trailer braking. And always remember the single common factor in all rollovers is speed. It's all about physics.

out of sight 05-16-2019 12:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ForestStranger (Post 2241988)

I've seen testimonies from people who have crashed. Latest was from a guy with a 2500 diesel and Reese hitch. The hitch failed, breaking behind the ball. The rollover crushed the 30' Airstream, flipping the truck on its side. Luckily only minor scrapes to driver and partner and cat.

Wow. The guy bought a hitch thinking it would make him safer and then the hitch caused a wreck.

n2916s 05-16-2019 01:50 PM

I am trying to get my head around the hitch failure. I can't imagine what forces would fracture the Reese head. I am also puzzled as to why the tongue didn't simply drop on the crossed safety chains, resulting in a challenging situation but one that is should have been less catastrophic...

gypsydad 05-16-2019 03:34 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by out of sight (Post 2242072)
Wow. The guy bought a hitch thinking it would make him safer and then the hitch caused a wreck.

Yea; who knows what happened...how old the hitch/condition, tire situation, etc... :brows: But, at least he was trying to be safe by using a WDH... Like I said earlier, to each his own...best of luck with not using a WDH and towing with a smaller TV then recommended for the size AS you have! Listen to who you want; follow your own zen...just try not to have an accident that involves others...:lol:

out of sight 05-16-2019 04:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by gypsydad (Post 2242135)
Yea; who knows what happened...how old the hitch/condition, tire situation, etc... :brows: But, at least he was trying to be safe by using a WDH... Like I said earlier, to each his own...best of luck with not using a WDH and towing with a smaller TV then recommended for the size AS you have! Listen to who you want; follow your own zen...just try not to have an accident that involves others...:lol:

My tow vehicle is big enough that I don't need a wd hitch. Actually, a good rule of thumb is that if you need a wd hitch then your tow vehicle isn't big enough to tow safely.

rmkrum 05-16-2019 04:04 PM

Airstream 25RB with 1300 Pounds of Payload on TV?
 
No, Iím going to strongly and politely disagree.

WD hitch is needed to properly distribute the load across the whole rig. Sway control is needed to control sway.

Just because you have a Ďbigí truck does not mean itís towing safely. Towing is not a ďrule of thumbĒ evolution. Itís all about physics and engineering. Itís not guesswork.

Also, was the rollover victim using some sort of sway control and was it set up properly?

Just having a fancy hitch means nothing unless itís set up right. Even the PPP hitches wonít work right unless set up properly.

Worse, you have to check for decent handling every time you set out. Bad WD adjustments can leave the TV front end too light, and that can easily lead to a loss of control accident. There are a lot of factors that must be just right to tow safely.

out of sight 05-16-2019 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rmkrum (Post 2242146)
WD hitch is needed to properly distribute the load across the whole rig.

I achieve near perfect weight distribution across my whole rig without a wd hitch.

out of sight 05-16-2019 04:28 PM

I say near perfect because I would actually like a little bit more load on my rear axle. A wd hitch can't do that.


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