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-   -   1968 Safari "Name this wire?" (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f37/1968-safari-name-this-wire-18832.html)

niss1679 10-23-2005 06:05 PM

1968 Safari "Name this wire?"
 
Ive looked on the threads and didnt find an answer. In the overhead storage compartment above the table in the front of the airstream I have a wire with wire nuts on it. Its not connected to anything. Does anyone know what this wire was for? Is it 120V or 12V? It also has two small wires coming out of the shell that look like speaker wires.

Thanks, Scott
68 Safari

uwe 10-23-2005 06:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by niss1679
Ive looked on the threads and didnt find an answer. In the overhead storage compartment above the table in the front of the airstream I have a wire with wire nuts on it. Its not connected to anything. Does anyone know what this wire was for? Is it 120V or 12V? It also has two small wires coming out of the shell that look like speaker wires.

Thanks, Scott
68 Safari

Much time has passed since 1968. Chances are your trailer had more than one owner, each with his/her own idea of wiring.
A picture would really help determine if this is factory wiring or someone's added wiring for accessories.
My very first guess would be tht it is 12V wiring for a radio or other accessory. 120V wiring is usually solid copper, and looks like house wiring.
However, don't touch anything just yet, better get a picture up, or buy a volt meter and measure the voltage against chassis ground.

niss1679 10-23-2005 06:42 PM

Thanks UWE,

It looks like regular 12/2 house wiring, but is aluminum instead of copper. My guess is that it is original. The only way I could see feeding it to where it comes out of the inner skin is to do so by having either the interior or exterior skin off. I have a cheap voltage tester that just lights up and buzzes when there is current, it does, I just dont know how many volts. I guess Ill just have to borrow my techs tester again.

Thanks,

uwe 10-23-2005 08:53 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by niss1679
Thanks UWE,

It looks like regular 12/2 house wiring, but is aluminum instead of copper. My guess is that it is original. The only way I could see feeding it to where it comes out of the inner skin is to do so by having either the interior or exterior skin off. I have a cheap voltage tester that just lights up and buzzes when there is current, it does, I just dont know how many volts. I guess Ill just have to borrow my techs tester again.

Thanks,

Be careful, if it's indeed 120V, then it will likely be hot with the trailer plugged into shore power.

SafeHarbor 10-24-2005 12:36 AM

Hi, Scott,

Root around a little in there and see if you can also find a radio antenna wire. That's where the stereo was located on my Argosy 28. It has one power wire, one ground wire, the antenna cable, and two twinleads that look rather like a cheap extension cord.

Lamar

AYRSTRM2 10-24-2005 11:06 AM

Aluminum wire was standard on this era of coaches. I'm 99% certain that that wire is for a radio or a 12 v outlet, should the original owner have requested one be installed, which they probably didn't . We have one or two unused 12V wires, one behind the fridge, and one up exactly where you stated.

We have used one to make a new 12 v outlet that we use to inflate our airbed we put up everynight over the dinette area.

John

till 10-24-2005 02:10 PM

I have to agree that it is a 12VDC wire due to it's location.
If it is aluminum, I will guess that your trailer is a California built one.

AYRSTRM2 10-25-2005 08:39 AM

Not to nitpick, but mine's an Ohio built and I have aluminum wires. Annoying little quirk, but I have a tube of that goo that helpsss:brows:

John

Quote:

Originally Posted by till
I have to agree that it is a 12VDC wire due to it's location.
If it is aluminum, I will guess that your trailer is a California built one.


JimmyJames 10-26-2005 08:49 PM

Look at the panel or converter for the same color and sized wire. Also look in the panel for aluminum or copper. This might help narrow it down.

Is the distribution panel wire all copper or all Alum. or a mix. This would provide some insight. If it is indeed aluminum I would guess that it was original wiring. Copper and Alum. was available in those years but coach makers chose AL, due to cost and issues with wieght. Later it was determined that aluminum had a bad habit. If it is aluminum wire check the terminals for an adequate smear of a grey/brown oily grease called commonly "No-Alox".

This is an oxidation inhibitor that should be applied as a coating to all the exposed (aluminum, not copper) wires in lugs, under screws or any other terminal connection where the wire ends. If it is not present consider adding some and checking for white aluminum powder Al/O2. Aluminum turns to powder in the presence of current and unlike aluminum metal, the powder is flammable.

Be sure the power is turned off.:sad:

If you still can't determine, buy a 2 dollar continuity tester and read the instructions on how to trace a wire to source. Probe till the light comes on, literally and figuratively. :)

Hope you figure it out.

niss1679 10-26-2005 09:13 PM

Thanks Jimmy James, way out on the other side of the country! I did find that it is indeed 12V that was used to power a radio in the 60's. I didnt know all that about aluminum wire though, THANKS! What was that stuff you mentioned to put on the conections?

JimmyJames 10-26-2005 10:09 PM

It is called NOALOX and is made by a company called IDEAL. You get it in the electrical sections in major hardware stores. There are other companys that make it under different product names but it is essentially a grease to keep the connections exposed to air from oxidizing. It is like painting iron but is remains gooey, unlike paint.

Cheers

AYRSTRM2 10-27-2005 11:30 AM

Also, check at better hardware supply shops; you can find wire nuts that have No-Alox in them already, or just make your own. I will take a wire nut and squirt it full, then connect the wires and wipe of any that squeezes out.

Tin Hut 10-27-2005 02:40 PM

1 Attachment(s)
If you've got alumn wiring like I did on my '67 you might consider changing out the 120 outlets with the special copper to alum connectors. You can google aluminum wiring and find a boatload of info. I found several of my 12 volt lights to have scorched wiring due to the alumn wiring loosening up and diminishing contact. I pigtailed them all using the goop and special wire nuts. Here's an example of how to pig tail copper to aluminum wiring.

JimmyJames 10-27-2005 08:45 PM

This is all good. I love the way these threads move along.

niss1679 10-27-2005 08:50 PM

Thanks all,

I'm going to pick up some goop so I have it on hand. I'm taking her out for the first time this weekend. 2 1/2 months of work to get her to this point. There are some before and after shots so far on my profile.

AYRSTRM2 10-28-2005 07:40 AM

Hey, nice coach and good job making her look like what she used to be, at least I assume you went from that weird brick dinette back to the gaucho and not the other way around...

Very smooth and straight skin too. Get an axle ASAP and that baby will be a beauty for another 40 years.

John


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