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-   -   Topping off the fuel & winterizing it, what grade of gas do you use? (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f159/topping-off-the-fuel-and-winterizing-it-what-grade-of-gas-do-you-use-173866.html)

WayneG 10-13-2017 08:10 AM

Topping off the fuel & winterizing it, what grade of gas do you use?
 
Getting the MH ready for winter storage here in the Northeast.
I just added Sta-bil and brought the tank up to about 3/4 full. (I will top it off later)
This year I have been using gas of 90 octane or better. Today Sunoco 93 octane.

My 454 has the TBI fuel injection modification and the engine is a replacement from about 60K miles ago.

I cant say definitively that I am getting better MPG with hightest, but it does seem to run better and have a bit more hill power on it.

I hear it is also better for storage over the winter.

What is your experience with hightest vs lower grade fuel?

dznf0g 10-13-2017 08:45 AM

Premium does have a longer storage life than regular. I would store with premium AND Sta-Bil. Tank should be full for storage.

WayneG 10-13-2017 09:51 AM

I do plan on filling it to the top next month, I may do one more run in November and I like to minimize weight over the mountains.

bobmiller1 10-13-2017 04:19 PM

Wayne, I only use premium from Stewart's......it's ethanol free, and it's great for the chain saws, lawn mowers, etc. Regards, Bob

jcl 10-13-2017 04:31 PM

I would pay far more attention to whether it was ethanol free than to the octane rating.

jcl 10-13-2017 04:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dznf0g (Post 2021007)
Premium does have a longer storage life than regular.

Why? If the concern is reduction in AKI over time, then premium does have a head start (if it drops four points, that may matter less to a specific engine). However, I don't see why it would be more stable, more resistant to phase separation, etc. Some premium doesn't have ethanol, which makes it better for long term storage, but that is a different issue.

perryg114 10-13-2017 04:55 PM

Ethanol absorbs water and promotes corrosion and also attacks rubber. Use ethanol free of whatever grade you can find it in. Octane is a secondary consideration. Fill the tank all the way up to reduce condensation. The less air space the less water will condense out.

Perry

dznf0g 10-13-2017 07:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcl (Post 2021154)
Why? If the concern is reduction in AKI over time, then premium does have a head start (if it drops four points, that may matter less to a specific engine). However, I don't see why it would be more stable, more resistant to phase separation, etc. Some premium doesn't have ethanol, which makes it better for long term storage, but that is a different issue.

Don't know why, but read it somewhere.

supercubep 10-14-2017 10:55 AM

Winterizing Fuel
 
I use 100 octane low lead aviation fuel in my generator ,ATV , UTV, Chain saw, mowers etc.. It doesn't go bad, it has a trace of lead, the purity is guaranteed, and the engines love it. 100 octane aviation gasoline has a dye in it guaranteeing its quality and octane value. I also run it in my 1930 Model A and my 1955 1 ton Ford flatbed dually. Obviously you can't run this type of gasoline in modern gas vehicles because of current emissions standards, but for older vehicles and small engines it's great. Aviation is not cheap, about $5.80 a gallon in Idaho. Prices vary in different states. You can get the fuel by going to your local airport with gas cans and the local operator will fill them for you.

dznf0g 10-14-2017 11:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by supercubep (Post 2021386)
I use 100 octane low lead aviation fuel in my generator ,ATV , UTV, Chain saw, mowers etc.. It doesn't go bad, it has a trace of lead, the purity is guaranteed, and the engines love it. 100 octane aviation gasoline has a dye in it guaranteeing its quality and octane value. I also run it in my 1930 Model A and my 1955 1 ton Ford flatbed dually. Obviously you can't run this type of gasoline in modern gas vehicles because of current emissions standards, but for older vehicles and small engines it's great. Aviation is not cheap, about $5.80 a gallon in Idaho. Prices vary in different states. You can get the fuel by going to your local airport with gas cans and the local operator will fill them for you.

All fuel eventually goes bad. The fuel you describe, I believe, ha s 2 year shelf life. Premium is 1 year. Regular is 6 months. This varies in different readings, but is my yardstick.

Bob662 10-14-2017 01:11 PM

I also have access to 100LL, and small engines do love it. It's also more stable that auto gas. But engines also love non-ethanol regular. Were it me, I'd fill with non-ethanol of whatever grade you can get (I've never seen it available in anything but regular/87 octane), and add some Sta-Bil or an equivalent fuel stabilizer if it's going to sit for months.

I believe the condensation thing is vastly overstated. I've heard that forever about aircraft fuel tanks. My experience from the past 50 years of aircraft ownership is water in the tank comes from being outside and rain or dew penetrates the fuel cap gaskets. I've never gotten a drop of water from sumping airplanes that were stored inside and weren't exposed to precipitation.

supercubep 10-14-2017 03:30 PM

Aviation gasoline has a life time more than 3 years, there are some cases of 5 to 8 years with engine startup with uncontaminated fuel. Back to the point, it's easy, no mixing, and reasonably priced. Not the crap they they sell at gas stations today. Just saying.🙂

MelGoddard 10-15-2017 06:53 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcl (Post 2021151)
I would pay far more attention to whether it was ethanol free than to the octane rating.

Absolutely!

MelGoddard 10-15-2017 06:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by supercubep (Post 2021471)
Aviation gasoline has a life time more than 3 years, there are some cases of 5 to 8 years with engine startup with uncontaminated fuel. Back to the point, it's easy, no mixing, and reasonably priced. Not the crap they they sell at gas stations today. Just saying.🙂

DO NOT USE AVGAS!
It had tetra-ethyl lead in it, as well as other compounds that could cause corrosion in your engine during long term storage.
Aero engines are designed for Avgas; auto engines are not!😬


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