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madogkenno 09-07-2017 11:47 AM

Air Conditioners
 
We just purchased our new Classic 30' 2018.
My wife wants to know the average life span of the ACs. Seems like both were on full time day and night, during this last heat wave.

Also, what is the cost of replacing for a new one?

HowieE 09-07-2017 12:00 PM

I replaced my 1991 last year not because of mechanical failure but water damage t the control board. The older units I would expect 25 years or more. The newer units not so much.

Run it until it fails as there is no way to predict when that might happen as they are a sealed unit.

CRH 09-07-2017 12:38 PM

my 1995 has it's original AC

uncle_bob 09-07-2017 12:51 PM

Hi

Figure 6 to 60 years :)

As mentioned above, there is no exact number. There are to many variables. Some of the parts will rust / corrode. Store the trailer outdoors and that will happen quicker. Use it at the seashore in the salt breeze and it will happen faster still. Even running "24 hours a day" the unit really does not run all that time. If it seems like they are you may not have the fan set to "auto". Even at 98 degrees out in the sun, mine drop out occasionally. Having them set to 65 degrees makes that a bit less likely than having them set to 80. I have never had them run all night long.

You have a couple of "chunks" in the AC. Things like fans and control boards can be replaced if they fail. They are pretty easy to find (even for older units). They also aren't terribly expensive. There are a couple of capacitors that also fall into the same category. The biggie is the compressor / refrigerator system. It's a sealed unit and essentially non-repairable. Its no different than the system in your fridge at home in that respect.

A few things that can be done to extend the life of the AC:

1) Clean the filters on the intakes. They are a bit of a pain to get to the first time.
2) Park in the shade if you can.
3) Put out the awnings unless it would be hazardous to do so.
4) Pull the shades shut as much as possible in the middle of the day.
5) Spend time outdoors, get used to the heat, run the temperature higher
6) Get an EMS box that will tell you when line voltage is low
7) Get a cheap fan at Target and use it to move the air when it's hot
8) Run at a constant temperature rather than fiddling it a lot up and down
9) Encourage the kids not to leave the door open all the time :)
10) Keep the doors to the outside storage areas closed (improves insulation)

Yes, that list could go on for quite a while .....

Bob

vintagemotor 09-07-2017 03:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uncle_bob (Post 2005502)
Hi

Figure 6 to 60 years :)

As mentioned above, there is no exact number. There are to many variables. Some of the parts will rust / corrode. Store the trailer outdoors and that will happen quicker. Use it at the seashore in the salt breeze and it will happen faster still. Even running "24 hours a day" the unit really does not run all that time. If it seems like they are you may not have the fan set to "auto". Even at 98 degrees out in the sun, mine drop out occasionally. Having them set to 65 degrees makes that a bit less likely than having them set to 80. I have never had them run all night long.

You have a couple of "chunks" in the AC. Things like fans and control boards can be replaced if they fail. They are pretty easy to find (even for older units). They also aren't terribly expensive. There are a couple of capacitors that also fall into the same category. The biggie is the compressor / refrigerator system. It's a sealed unit and essentially non-repairable. Its no different than the system in your fridge at home in that respect.

A few things that can be done to extend the life of the AC:

1) Clean the filters on the intakes. They are a bit of a pain to get to the first time.
2) Park in the shade if you can.
3) Put out the awnings unless it would be hazardous to do so.
4) Pull the shades shut as much as possible in the middle of the day.
5) Spend time outdoors, get used to the heat, run the temperature higher
6) Get an EMS box that will tell you when line voltage is low
7) Get a cheap fan at Target and use it to move the air when it's hot
8) Run at a constant temperature rather than fiddling it a lot up and down
9) Encourage the kids not to leave the door open all the time :)
10) Keep the doors to the outside storage areas closed (improves insulation)

Yes, that list could go on for quite a while .....

Bob

Bob hit the main reason for AC failure with #6, low line voltage in a full RV resort will kill your AC faster than any other issue, otherwise expect them to fail right after the 2yr warranty ends, sorry but true.


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