Airstream Forums

Airstream Forums (http://www.airforums.com/forums/)
-   1970-79 Tradewind (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f125/)
-   -   '72 Demo Related Questions (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f125/72-demo-related-questions-170871.html)

hbf442 08-04-2017 08:58 AM

'72 Demo Related Questions
 
2 Attachment(s)
During our demo we've discovered a couple of things:

1. After a recent a rainshower, the fresh water access door was leaking into the trailer. This answered our question as to why the fresh water tank was always full. Does the door need to be replaced?

2. The furnace duct is uninsulated and run on the floor. Is this common?

Sub floor is still looking good, but we haven't made it to the infamous rear "wet" bathroom.

Any thoughts from the "resto veterans" would be appreciated.

BambiTex 08-04-2017 09:06 AM

Ductwork
 
The duct on my 67 Overlander is the same. It is long and only serves a single outlet under the tub. I think only a very small amount of warm air actually makes it that far but the long uninsulated run acts kind of like a radiant heater under the cabinets, bed and tub:-)
Mine is currently disconnected to make room for gray water plumbing...

TheGreatleys 08-04-2017 09:14 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hbf442 (Post 1988344)
1. After a recent a rainshower, the fresh water access door was leaking into the trailer. This answered our question as to why the fresh water tank was always full. Does the door need to be replaced?

No, they all do that. Makes you not want to drink out of your tanks. If you open the water door, you'll probably see a thin rubber gasket around the top and sides of the door. I think that was designed to avoid having water leak in, but I can't imagine it ever worked very well. You can try to replace it with a new very thin gasket, but I don't know that it's worth it.

Quote:

Originally Posted by hbf442 (Post 1988344)
2. The furnace duct is uninsulated and run on the floor. Is this common?

Yes that's normal.

Wear a mask when you start tearing into insulation and other mousy stuff. Hanta virus is a thing. Keep taking pictures and posting. Looking good so far.

hbf442 08-04-2017 12:12 PM

Ok, thanks y'all! At least the always full fresh water tank mystery is solved.

TxDave 08-05-2017 04:33 PM

The fresh water access door on our 1971 Sovereign does not leak. The furnace ducting was not insulated.

Monza 08-05-2017 05:10 PM

Might want to think of replacing the water access door and water inlet with a locking one.
That heat venting is typical, I'll be replacing that same set up with 3" or 4" insulated flex ducting.

SuzyHomemakr 08-06-2017 02:41 PM

I threw all of my un-insulated ducting away, along with the 45 year old heater. Replaced it with a second AC. That's Florida living for you! :)

perryg114 08-06-2017 03:21 PM

As long as the heat from the furnace leaks into the trailer you are ok. They run uninsulated tubes usually under the kitchen and other areas where there is plumbing to help keep it from freezing. There is also a small tube that goes under the floor to keep the tanks from freezing.

Perry

uncle_bob 08-06-2017 03:48 PM

Hi

If you plan on drinking "trailer water", the inlet door needs to be replaced. Many people simply bring along bottled water and solve the problem that way. Water for personal consumption is pretty far down on the usage hit list.

Bob

hbf442 08-07-2017 07:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SuzyHomemakr (Post 1989520)
I threw all of my un-insulated ducting away, along with the 45 year old heater. Replaced it with a second AC. That's Florida living for you! :)

Lol, in our first "Vintage" trailer (Argosy Minuet) we never used the heater. We always carried a small space heater just in case. The winters in S.E. Texas can be brutal, especially when we have to break out the long sleeved shirts. :lol: We'll be replacing all of the appliances in this one though.

hbf442 08-07-2017 07:55 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uncle_bob (Post 1989550)
Hi

If you plan on drinking "trailer water", the inlet door needs to be replaced. Many people simply bring along bottled water and solve the problem that way. Water for personal consumption is pretty far down on the usage hit list.

Bob

Don't drink the water!! Personal experience from many years of camping. I always warn every guest...that's just me though.

perryg114 08-07-2017 03:15 PM

The door inlet is not designed to be sealed. There is the inlet tube and a vent above that. If it were totally sealed the tank would air lock. You still need an air vent.

perryg114 08-07-2017 03:35 PM

The door inlet is not designed to be sealed. There is the inlet tube and a vent above that. If it were totally sealed the tank would air lock. You still need an air vent.

jballauer 08-07-2017 05:31 PM

I concur...both cases are typical. I will be addressing the water inlet issue in my rebuild, as that bothers me like crazy...even so, I'd never want to drink the tank water.

No need for insulation on the furnace duct since loss heat will end up in the trailer anyway. This is also why ducted ACs in an RV do not require insulation in certain circumstances. But when you have ducting running through your home attic, then your lost heat (or cold) will be truly lost; hence, the insulated ducts.


All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:45 AM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2019, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.