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-   -   What vehicle to tow a 2016 FC 28.. (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f238/what-vehicle-to-tow-a-2016-fc-28-a-163791.html)

VaTravelers 03-17-2017 10:22 PM

I have a 28' 2017 Serenity. My TV is a 2005 F250 diesel with 42K miles. I know I can pull it with a 1/2 ton truck, but the peace of mind of the heavier TV is well worth the extra cost. The last thing any of us wants is adding one more thing to worry about driving down the road.

dkottum 03-17-2017 10:49 PM

We have traveled with our Airstream FC 25 (a FC 28 weighs 300 lbs more fully loaded and they both will load near 1,000 lbs hitch weight, 200 lbs less on the truck after weight distribution) in every western and central state, all of the southeast and most of the northeast, much of it several times, with a 2012 Ram 1500 Reg Cab Hemi. Plenty of power, decent fuel economy, we never needed anything but our truck and trailer service brakes to stop it. Using engine compression and low transmission gears saves the brakes. It was a $24,000 new truck.

With a trade-in offer of nearly that, we got a 2016 Ram 1500 EcoDiesel 8-speed. Even better tow vehicle , 28-30 mpg solo and 16-19 mpg towing, and a really nice daily driver.

Payload. Payload/GVWR will help us keep from overloading our rear axle when hauling loads and not towing with a weight distribution hitch. When we hitch up our Airstream and set the weight distribution system, the payload/GVWR tells us nothing. We weigh the truck/trailer to ensure our axles are not overloaded and the combo is within the truck's GCWR which tells us what the truck is designed to pull and stop. Our Ram axles are rated to carry 3900 lbs each.

Weight distribution hitch. Fully 1/3 of a safe and successful towing combination, a quality, capable hitch will help ensure our axles are not overloaded, ensure we have enough weight on the steering axle for control in all weather conditions, and either help control or eliminate the possibility of trailer sway. We use the Hensley/ProPride design that eliminates the possibility of sway and always keeps the trailer in alignment with out truck. A half-ton truck must have a properly set up and capable w.d. hitch for a medium size Airstream.

Suspension. Independent suspension at each wheel is far superior for stability, but not offered on common pickups. Some large SUV's have it, the Ford Expedition is a good example, and it's Ecoboost engine delivers all the power you will need. Our Rams have front independent suspension and the cheap rear solid axle suspension common to pickups. Full coil suspension gives a smooth, comfortable ride and a little more stability at the rear axle. Without weight distribution, the rear suspension will sag. You do not need after-market air bags to bring it back up, a capable w.d. hitch will do it if you don't overload the bed of the pickup.

Worries. None.

leje 03-18-2017 05:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by USAtraveler (Post 1923864)
Buying a used truck for a TV....no question...go with the Tundra. Basically a 3/4 ton payload. Best reliability rating of any p/u and in rare cases you need parts or service, they are available everywhere...even in Mexico. I drove a new 2008 Tundra w/o tow pkg for 4 years, towing a tandem axle utility trailer loaded with tools and materials...heavier I'd wager than the 28"FC. Towed it everywhere, never had a problem. True, the engine worked hard maintaining 55 uphill, but so what...you're not out there trying to qualify for the Daytona 500, and the Tundra engine/tranny can handle it...never overheated or rev'ed close to redline. Resale value after 4 years was also better than any other make.

This payload comment is absolutely false. The Tundra is a half ton truck with half ton payload. The 2014 Tundra platinum I traded for my Denali HD had a payload of 1400 lbs. the Tundra has open c channel in the rear of the frame which is done to help the ride. However, it doesn't help stability towing large loads.

SCOTTinNJ 03-18-2017 07:30 AM

If you go diesel watch payload even on 3/4 tons. Often it makes sense just to jump to 1 ton at that point. Not as much with gas engines as they weigh significantly less.

silverlabs 03-18-2017 08:46 AM

I will add my two cents on this subject which as typical with tow vehicle discussions goes a little bit of everywhere. I have had a 25FC and currently have a 28FC. I towed the 25FC and 28FC with either a 2011 F150 EcoBoost or a 2015 F150 EcoBoost and both did a fine job with either trailer through extensive Western US and Canada travels. Long uphill climbs in Montana and CO in July/August heat tested the truck but did fine overall. Payload as many have indicated is something to watch for as the tongue weight on a 28FC is easily a few hundred more pounds than a 25FC even though overall weight fully loaded is only 300 pounds more. I can't speak on how the OP travels and loads their truck but for us not really an issue.

Due to some electrical gremlins in the 2015 F150 that continued to arise I ordered a 2017 F250 6.7 Platinum when the order banks opened up and took possession of the truck late Sept 2016. Absolutely love the truck. Just completed a 6,700 mile trip with the 28FC and my wife even commented how much better the F250 was to ride in while on a long trip. That alone is a win win. Smooth on highway, no effects when 18 wheelers blast by you going the opposite direction on small two lane roads and the exhaust brakes make going downhill a pleasure. Uphill climbs, no issue whatsoever on even the steepest climbs. We also were on I10 right before they closed the highway for a few days due to wind/dust a few weeks ago and felt little to no affects of the wind. I do use a ProPride hitch which I highly recommend.

After using the F150's for pulling thousands of miles and just the comparison of the short pulling experience so far with the F250, I doubt that I would ever go back to a 1/2 ton. The overall comfort in knowing the truck can handle most any situation you will encounter makes the travel and towing experience must more relaxed and comfortable in the long run.

Good luck in your decision and safe travels with whichever combination you decide on. Only you know your travel habits and comfort zone in pulling.

Chuck

Mergatroyd 03-18-2017 02:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MWL530 (Post 1921681)
I am about to purchase a 28 ft 2016 FC. It's my first AS. I'm asking for guidance on the proper vehicle(s) for towing. I would like to purchase a 1-2 yrs old considering Ford 150, Toyota Tundra, Chevy/ GMC 1500 SLT. Will be driven Ozarks and Ar-Tx.
Diesel pro and con? Thanks

A 1/2 ton will do the job pulling a 28 but it's near the upper limit on pulling and payload. The 28 has almost a 1000 lb hitch weight and that doesn't leave much payload for other things in the truck. A 3/4 ton will do a better job towing on the Highway but it's not easy taking it to the supermarket. If you're going to unhitch and use it around town a lot I would recommend a 1/2 ton. If you're going back and forth Florida to Alaska then I'd get a 3/4 ton. Diesel is better for towing since it develops max torque at low RPM cruising speeds, and also because your MPG won't suffer as much while towing. You can get a diesel in the Ram 1500 and Ford F-150 is coming out with one in 2018. Otherwise you'll need to step up to a 3/4 ton for a diesel.

MelGoddard 03-18-2017 03:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Arcticfox (Post 1923154)
Very well thought out post Bruce. Well done!
By the way we pull our 28' with a F150 Eco with HD Tow package and it has been great

Same here for a 30' FC.:D

paulken 03-18-2017 04:35 PM

For a 28 foot I would use no less than a 3/4 ton truck.

I pull a 28 with a 2003 Dodge 1 ton DRW and it works for me. the truck has a 35 gallon tank and I carry 45 more gallons in the bed. I can stop in Cheyenne WY and fill up and drive back to Texas and have 1/3 of a tank left. I don't have to worry about finding a gas station that has the room to get the trailer in and out.

When backing up to hookup the trailer my wife helps to guide and by the time I get out she can have it on the ball and almost all hooked up.

When I bought my trailer I got both the truck and trailer together. The PO had pulled this trailer for 10 years with a 1994 Dodge 3/4 SRW and than bought The 1 ton for the next 10 years.

So what I can say about using a 1 ton DRW is that it makes life a lot easier.

paulken 03-18-2017 04:38 PM

This may help also.

GO to

WBCCI
maint info
Howard's Tech Articles
Safe Towing Capacity

Dan_Rox 03-18-2017 04:57 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SCOTTinNJ (Post 1924009)
If you go diesel watch payload even on 3/4 tons. Often it makes sense just to jump to 1 ton at that point. Not as much with gas engines as they weigh significantly less.

This is worth repeating. I was at the auto show last month comparing door stickers for payload. A 1/2 ton F-150 with an STX package, (a no frills basic truck) had over 1800 in payload capacity. A 3/4 ton GMC Denali with diesel and what looked like every available option had a payload of 1600 pounds. Many people think because they have a 3/4 ton they have plenty of payload capacity but are actually more overloaded than some 1/2 ton trucks.

dkottum 03-18-2017 05:03 PM

It's helpful to learn from the towing experts who have been in this business for two generations, over 45 years.

http://www.canamrv.ca/towing-expertise/

leje 03-19-2017 07:35 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Mergatroyd (Post 1924219)
A 1/2 ton will do the job pulling a 28 but it's near the upper limit on pulling and payload. The 28 has almost a 1000 lb hitch weight and that doesn't leave much payload for other things in the truck. A 3/4 ton will do a better job towing on the Highway but it's not easy taking it to the supermarket. If you're going to unhitch and use it around town a lot I would recommend a 1/2 ton. If you're going back and forth Florida to Alaska then I'd get a 3/4 ton. Diesel is better for towing since it develops max torque at low RPM cruising speeds, and also because your MPG won't suffer as much while towing. You can get a diesel in the Ram 1500 and Ford F-150 is coming out with one in 2018. Otherwise you'll need to step up to a 3/4 ton for a diesel.

Excellent points. Although the half ton diesels are a CAFE play, they aren't made to tow heavy. Rather, they allow a half ton truck to get nearly 30 MPG.

leje 03-19-2017 07:41 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan_Rox (Post 1924270)
This is worth repeating. I was at the auto show last month comparing door stickers for payload. A 1/2 ton F-150 with an STX package, (a no frills basic truck) had over 1800 in payload capacity. A 3/4 ton GMC Denali with diesel and what looked like every available option had a payload of 1600 pounds. Many people think because they have a 3/4 ton they have plenty of payload capacity but are actually more overloaded than some 1/2 ton trucks.

My 2015 Denali, which is the same truck, older Duramax, has 2200 lbs payload. Does the new L5P weigh 600 lbs more than the LML?

AirstreamCSH 03-19-2017 08:50 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by paulken (Post 1924266)
This may help also.

GO to

WBCCI
maint info
Howard's Tech Articles
Safe Towing Capacity



Excellent post. Thank you.

aftermath 03-19-2017 10:37 AM

I tow my 25FB with a 2008 Tundra with a tow package. I have been very happy with this but.....there are some issues that need to be stated. First of all, the weight of the trailer is not an issue. The 5.7 is a brute and we do fine in the hills. The tongue weight will always be an issue with any half ton.

We travel light, just the two of us, no dogs and not a lot of extra stuff in the bed. We are under our ratings but not by much when it comes to payload. Someone mentioned feeling good about running at "90% capacity" and I am quite happy. The Tundra is a very well made half ton. I once loaded over 2000 pounds of green fire wood on the back and noticed that the springs were not even close to the stops. I weighed the load on the way home that day and would not recommend doing this to anyone. The point is that the suspension was up to it.

That said, we have been looking at getting a larger trailer. The 27FB is very close to ours in tongue weight so I would not hesitate pulling one of these. When I looked into the 28 stats I did see the heavier tongue weight. I feel that I would have to change TVs.

I would not rule out a 3/4 ton. Like many trucks there are lots of options out there for these and many will have ample payload ratings for the 28. Just my two cents. But then, I am not a big diesel fan either.

Dan_Rox 03-19-2017 11:16 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by leje (Post 1924463)
My 2015 Denali, which is the same truck, older Duramax, has 2200 lbs payload. Does the new L5P weigh 600 lbs more than the LML?

I don't know the differences between your truck and the one I saw, but I would guess the majority weight difference is in additional options. Sunroof, power retracting running boards... all start to add up.

HeadWest 03-19-2017 01:34 PM

Keep in mind the real world, ready to tow tongue weights. The 27FB's carry additional weight forward with the outside storage compartment and weight under the bed going on the tongue. The 28's are the opposite with the outside storage and the bed storage in the rear. I would be willing to bet that if you weighed the tongue on a bunch of road ready 27's and 28's at a rally, they would be very similar tongue weight.

FWIW, I'm towing a 28 with a '13 F150 Echoboast, max tow and LT tires, propride hitch. It has plenty of power and is very stable, within capacities including payload and axle weights per several trips across scales. Love the engine and power, complaints have been with poor dealers, my sync and crappy service life out of brakes (this has also been true with not towing and my son's virtually same F150).

Outdoorjojo 03-19-2017 05:46 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Dan_Rox (Post 1924556)
I don't know the differences between your truck and the one I saw, but I would guess the majority weight difference is in additional options. Sunroof, power retracting running boards... all start to add up.



My 2016 2500 Denali Diesel has 2185lbs of payload. That's included sunroof, running boards....

MelGoddard 03-19-2017 06:48 PM

I see in this Forum that there are a number of writers here who are not familiar with the 'Readers Digest' version

Mergatroyd 03-20-2017 12:18 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by leje (Post 1924458)
Excellent points. Although the half ton diesels are a CAFE play, they aren't made to tow heavy. Rather, they allow a half ton truck to get nearly 30 MPG.

You're right about the EcoDiesel being a small engine. The Ford F-150 diesel will probably not be much better. My diesel SUV has a more powerful engine than the EcoDiesel, and that kind of turns me off. But I do like the low-end torque of a diesel. When I was younger I wanted 5000 RPM. Now I prefer chugging along at 1800 RPM.


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