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-   -   1962 22' Safari (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f321/1962-22-safari-15592.html)

jcferguson 02-22-2005 10:02 PM

1962 22' Safari
 
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Hello All,

I am in deep in a renovation of my 22' Safari.

I started by tearing out some of the things I was sure I didn't want, then some more, then decided to replace the water system (pressurized galvanized tank filled with sludge)... pretty soon the shell was on blocks and I am welding on the frame. It all just happened so fast...

Right now I am working on adding a grey water tank just behind the axle and moving the fresh water tank to just in front of the axle. If I can get some pictures to attach one of them will have a side view of the frame with cross members circled in red that will be replaced by 2"x4" rectangular tube stock - 1/8". This is to provide some extra support for the tanks and something solid to attach the "tank hanger" to. The original tank was 30 gallons, and the galvanized tank probably added about 40-50 pounds. I am considering increasing the tank size to just less than 40 gallons, which will be close to a wash in weight, the grey tank will be about 24 gallons just behind the axle, and the black tank will go from 12 or so to about 20. I believe that with the frame strengthening I am doing this extra weight shouldn't be a problem, especially since it is centered closely on the axle, lowering the center of gravity of the trailer overall. I should also add that I am putting on a new axle that is rated for 4000lbs, and removing a fair amount of weight from the interior (two layers of linoleum to the tune of 200 pounds will be replaced with cork flooring for example...).

Another photo is of a strange wheel on this frame that seems to have the bolts pointing in from the outside... has anyone seen this before?

I have been having trouble posting, so I am hopeful that the photos will follow.

Any thoughts about the tank locations or that strange wheel?

Thanks,

Carlos Ferguson

RichardT 02-22-2005 10:25 PM

Please post more pictures! Where is the body? did you take pictures from the start? If not you need to put it back toghether and start over again!

Just kidding.

It is easy to get carried away.
You have it and you have it bad, can you say Aluminitus?

I am sure you will have an awsome trailer when you are done and will get a lot of help from forum members.

flyfshr 02-22-2005 11:45 PM

The wheel is an original to your trailer and has the clips for the original baby moons. Hard to tell from the photo but it may be a split rim and if so, I would chuck it. You're adding alot of weight to the trailer when you consider that water weighs, what is it?, 8.7 pounds a gallon. An increase of just 10 gallons adds 87 pounds. I don't care to know what sewage weighs a gallon.

FF
formerly from IA - too cold, not enough trout

uwe 02-23-2005 01:10 AM

Nice work!
 
Carlos,

You are doing a very similar thing to your frame as I did recently. I believe that you should box in the frame to add some strength, also check for heavy corrosion neear the axle mounting area, and add steel if necessary.
My tank installation is finished now, and I am very pleased with the outcome. I replaced all the rusted cross members with 3x4in square tube steel.
The wheel looks like an original. The clips you see hold on a baby moon hub cap. I suggest you check the offset before ordering new wheels. The original split rims on my Overlander had a definite positiva offset.
Your wheel does not look like a split rim. You might have it blasted and powdercoated, providing it is not damaged.

jcferguson 03-08-2005 10:47 PM

62' Safari Progress
 
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An update on my 62'

1 - reinforced the frame by boxing in the c channel
2 - added spots for a fresh and grey tank on either side of the axle
3 - POR-15ed (which is a verb)
4 - installed conduit for the brake line and rear lights/12v needs as I plan to have the battery boxes in front
5 - put in the new floor with 3/4" ply, ACX
6 - bought a macerator on ebay!


A couple questions: when you fill a fresh water tank, how do you know when to stop? The fresh tank must have an inlet and a vent, so how do the city water pressure systems work? Bypass the tank and pump to use this method?

Carlos Ferguson

jcferguson 03-08-2005 10:59 PM

Don't look into the light little airstream!
 
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Also some repairs to the wheelwells, I used butyl rubber as a sealant, sometimes called gutter seal.


Soon: floor and shell together again.

53flyingcloud 03-08-2005 10:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcferguson
An update on my 62'

A couple questions: when you fill a fresh water tank, how do you know when to stop? The fresh tank must have an inlet and a vent, so how do the city water pressure systems work? Bypass the tank and pump to use this method?

Carlos Ferguson

Carlos,
The city water system is actually a separate system..,running parallel to the on-board water system...There are diagrams of the plumbing needed on the forum..(if not, let me know and I'll send you what I have on file)
ciao
53FC

jcferguson 07-27-2005 08:49 PM

62 Safari Update
 
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I've been "off the job" for a few months but now that it is hot here in Iowa I am back for more.

The pictures below show my progress - A couple from the early days and then new axle is installed, 3 inches of foamular insulation attached to the bottom, a mix of new and old c channel attached to the floor, and the beginnings of my new belly pan (guarded by James the cat). Thanks to Uwe for advice on the belly pan.
Carlos Ferguson

jcferguson 07-27-2005 08:50 PM

Pictures
 
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More Pictures...

jcferguson 08-23-2005 08:19 PM

Wheel Wells
 
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I got the belly skin back on and moved on to the skin replacement...

Both wheel wells were damaged and since I was only planning on replacing one side-skin, I cut a half circle above the wheel and excised the damaged metal. This looks something like the curve of rivets I have seen on other airstreams and leaves me with a piece I can easily remove and replace should I have a blow-out.

Plus it makes me think of 80's designer jeans.

First I cut a half circle using a large compass to draw on the aluminum with pencil.

Next I used the cut-out piece as a pattern for a slightly larger half circle. I fit this into place and cleco-ed.

With the piece in place I could carefully cut out the trim-hole (for lack of a better term) and file it to fit exactly.

I cut and shaped the trim using snips and pliers - this was a tricky process, but once I got the hang of it... I use the pliers to pull two tabs apart (as pictured) a little at a time, moving back and forth until it was roughly the right shape. I fit it into place and tapped with a mallet until it fit. Butyl Rubber and Rivets!

Pics:

jcferguson 08-23-2005 08:30 PM

New Skin
 
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I replaced the trunk section, the front and center, a rear quarter panel and the curb side due to damage and corrosion. For the smaller pieces the .032 2024 alclad was great. The rear quarter with a curve was easier than the straight pieces - the curve kind of masks any minor waves.

For the side I should have used the .040. I am considering replacing this side again as it is a little wavy, but am also thinking this might force me to realize that I am obsessed... If only I could do it when I am finished.

I am redesigning the interior and will have no use for the trunk, so off it goes - I like the clean look better I think. The trunk area was a mess with dents and a small tear.

moogie32 08-23-2005 09:57 PM

Wow! What an incredible job you're doing! Keep up the good work. That's one lucky trailer! Diane

uwe 08-23-2005 11:46 PM

Looking good, Carlos.

A-Merry-Can 10-14-2005 08:08 AM

cool!
 
hey carlos,

i didn't realize you had a string started. i'll have to keep an eye on it. we're about neck and neck, aren't we? i've got a little more to go on the skin replacement, though, so you're about to pull ahead, me thinks. :D

i did the same thing with the rear of mine, btw, and lost the trunk. at first, i was thinking about putting the batteries in there,a nd venting the door, but upon thinking it over, if i do stick the batteries in there, they would be just as accessible under the bed, so i may vent them through the floor. of course, they may go up front, still. it's funny how much my plans have changed as i've gotten into this. i planned on an under-floor tank, and even cut out and rewelded the cross-braces up for it, bought the tank... and decided i didn't like the way the tank hung down (mine hung down almost 4 inches from the belly)... so now it's going under the front window. it'll probably end up spmewhere else when this is all said and done! ha!

do you have plans for the interior you could post?

jp

uwe 10-14-2005 08:39 AM

Trim
 
Carlos,
The trim you were using around the wheelwells looks very sturdy.
What is it? Where did you get it?

A-Merry-Can 10-14-2005 09:12 AM

Trim
 
Ha! i logged back on to ask the same question! hook us up!

:cool:

jp

jcferguson 10-14-2005 08:05 PM

Wheel trim
 
Don Wilbur sent me this information, I am happy to pass it on...

The trim is from Brunner Enterprises, they have a lot of useful looking pieces, including some aluminum slider stuff that looks good for doors and things...

The trim is called mirror trim, (Cap g51sl 1/16"). It fit well around the two pieces of metal (exterior skin and wheel well metal) where they come together at the wheel wells. It was around $25 for 12', I had it cut into three 4' lengths and shipped. Here is the link:

http://www.brunnerent.com/Tools/Port...=1&strMetaTag=

jcferguson 10-14-2005 08:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by A-Merry-Can
hey carlos,

i did the same thing with the rear of mine, btw, and lost the trunk. at first, i was thinking about putting the batteries in there,a nd venting the door, but upon thinking it over, if i do stick the batteries in there, they would be just as accessible under the bed, so i may vent them through the floor. of course, they may go up front, still. it's funny how much my plans have changed as i've gotten into this. i planned on an under-floor tank, and even cut out and rewelded the cross-braces up for it, bought the tank... and decided i didn't like the way the tank hung down (mine hung down almost 4 inches from the belly)... so now it's going under the front window. it'll probably end up spmewhere else when this is all said and done! ha!

do you have plans for the interior you could post?

jp

I am having similar move-it-from-here-to-there-in-my-head experiences as I work. I am, in fact, working on the layout tonight. I will post some plans tomorrow and see if anyone out there has ideas... New pictures of progress too.

Likewise, I would like to see your plan... a rear bed back by the trunk? I am thinking something along these lines. I am moving my bathroom from the rear where it took up more than 20% of my available square footage to the side where it will be reduced to about 5%. I am planning an all in one toilet/shower with a holding tank built under the toilet, a fiberglassed shower pan floor that will drain down into a gray water holding tank underneath (ideas for my water system by the hundreds from Uwe...) I just couldn't justify the HUGE tub that was in there, though I found a site with an image of the tub under a dinette seat and am tempted to do this... but do I really need a tub? How often does that get used unless you have hookups? I might do it anyway.

http://www.vintage-vacations.com/61airstream_3.htm

That tub right next to the tiny woodstove I am going to install...

http://www.marinestove.com/airstream.htm

It turned out that the owner of this company is also the designer and re-builder of the airstream pictured and was quite willing to talk at length about his installation and what he would change after living in it for two years in NYC. I lived in Provincetown on Cape Cod for a couple winters in a tiny apartment with only wood heat and loved it. The smallest stove should be just right for my space I think.

Today was spent refabricating the rain guard over the door which was beat up and bent and letting water through which came right inside as my door has no weather stripping right now (where do I get it for a 62' trailer? any ideas anyone?) I took off the old piece and spent a chunk of time polishing and fixing before I decided it was too far gone and so then used a leftover piece of .040 from the side replacement to fabricate a new piece. It looks great installed and is much stiffer. Water begone. Also, a new curved peice of tubing that fits inside the wall and will be the vent for the gray water tank. It was impossible to find a match for the 1962 abs pipe, so I found some new poly pipe and bent it with a blowtorch. It isn't exactly pretty, but it will work fine...

Pictures tomorrow, and plans.

Carlos

jcferguson 10-15-2005 09:49 PM

Progresses
 
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I've been working but not posting, so here is catchup.

I finished the belly and skin replacement finally, here are some shots of the bottom front and the patches I made to cover the poorly designed outside plug and antenna jacks. Both were leaking large amounts of water down to rot the floor beneath. I am tempted to make a solar system on my airstream with these patches. These patches suggested the wheels I chose (also inspired by how good these wheels looked on Uwe's trailer).

jcferguson 10-15-2005 09:54 PM

Windows and Leaks
 
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All the windows needed some attention, this was a surprisingly (what isn't?) time consuming enterprise. I took off all the rain caps, polished and re-rivetted them back in place with new sealant, removed all the windows and put in a lot of new glass with new butyl rubber seal, new weather stripping. Then I used a wire wheel to clean the insides of the windows of paint - I think I will leave them like this and use some 1.5" L shaped aluminum for trim around the windows.

When I finished and took the trailer outside in the rain: leaks, front and back on the end caps where there didn't seem to be any sealant from the factory. I tried to fix this on the inside with no luck, then I used the alcoa aluminum seal and a syringe which fixed the leaks completely. Photos of the syringe below, I used an 18 gauge needle filed off to an angle as a tiny caulking gun to run along the seams.

jcferguson 10-15-2005 10:03 PM

Roof Vent
 
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The vent for the sink went through the wall on the curb side and exited out the top. The original trim must have been lost as a bathroom wall trim for a sink drain was used, filled with caulk and screwed on. I moved my bath from the rear to the side, so I had the trim piece from the old black water tank stack. I found some poly tubing and bent it with a propane torch to fit into the wall and then bent it again to fit up into the trim piece on top. I spray painted the pipe coming out the top silver, though I might make it red later.

I also put a fantastic fan on top rear and a fantastic vent in the front. I patched up the middle hole, I want to put solar up there and this will give me about 100" to work with.

I put the tail lights and plate holder back on as well.

jcferguson 10-15-2005 10:07 PM

Rain awning for door
 
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My door cover was beat up and bent, the seal was gone as well. Water dripped straight down into my door which currently has no weatherstripping (where do I get this?) and right onto the floor (in the spot where it had been rotted before my new plywood.

I took the old piece and flattened it with a mallet, then cut an identical piece from .040 (instead of the .032 that was stock). I used a big brake to bend the front edge and bent the back curved part by hand with some flat tipped pliers, little by little. Then I bent the entire thing over my knee until it was curved correctly and rivetted into the original holes. Viola, dry door.

jcferguson 10-15-2005 10:11 PM

Insulation
 
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I used the foil bubble method pioneered by Malconium and am quite happy with the results. Before insulation, any sun at all would turn the thing into a miniature black hole of heat death. With the insulation in and the windows open it seems to stay cooler than outside. I will get even more benefit when I put in the interior skin as there will be another dead air space between me and the outside. I do think I am going to use some cork underlayment on all the ribs to cut down on condensation and create a thermal break before the interior skin.

jcferguson 10-15-2005 10:16 PM

Going back together!
 
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I am going to put wood on my walls and my father suggested it might be easier to do the endcaps over the fiberglass - to have something to rivet to. I said yes. I cut out the shelves with a jigsaw, then rivetted some aluminum to the back to reinforce the areas that were cut away. This worked great - I will probably rivet some 1/8" ply into the space in front of that aluminum I added just so everything is on the same level when I go to attach the curved bits of wood.

I am still thinking a bit of making the endcaps polished aluminum to contrast with the wood that will skin the rest of the trailer - I might try both and see which I like more. Or maybe just aluminum in front where there will be a dinette, wood in back where my work tables will be.

How thrilling it is to put something back in the trailer that I took out. Finally.

jcferguson 10-15-2005 10:21 PM

Cork Floor
 
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I am going to try to make a Roman marble tile floor out of cork. I ordered the 12" squares from amcork.com and will cut them into this pattern. This is my mock-up using the images of their tile they had on their website. I am hoping it will be pretty subtle but still noticeable. It should arrive on Wednesday and I want to get it in before it gets too cold for the glue.

uwe 10-15-2005 10:22 PM

Great progress!

A-Merry-Can 10-16-2005 07:01 AM

Whoa! someone's been busy! :D

awesome! i think i'll have to do the bubble insulation as well. i hate that itchy stuff.

jp

Ken J 10-16-2005 09:13 AM

Looks great!

Boy do I ever understand the feeling when you get to start putting stuff back in after you have been tearing things apart for what seems like eternity - - - - - -

One suggestion, I would put the wood paneling over aluminum skin - my concern is as you go down the road, the wood will not hold hold the fasheners - the interior skin adds a lot of strengh to the trailer

Ok ok Uwe - I'll get those wheels :) :) :)

Ken

A-Merry-Can 10-16-2005 11:12 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ken J
Ok ok Uwe - I'll get those wheels :) :) :)

Ken

maybe we all should? ha! i like em too!

jp

uwe 10-16-2005 12:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcferguson
I used the foil bubble method pioneered by Malconium and am quite happy with the results. Before insulation, any sun at all would turn the thing into a miniature black hole of heat death.

Carlos,
As you know, I used the very same method, ( thanks Malconium!) and now have some real life results with it, all favorable.
Using a space heater at night kept the trailer wonderfully warm, and I could hear a 1500W space heater kick on and off, once or twice my fantastic fans kicked on because I left the thermostat on the daytime setting, and the lids cranked open during the night.
During daytime, in bright sun, the inside skins barely got warm to the touch.
I remember in similar situations, the inside skin of my tradewind getting good and warm to the touch, almost hot.
I think that so far I am very pleased with this method of insulation.
Carlos, make sure and use aluminum tape to tape off all seams and cracks that are left, I believe that that's very important for a quality installation.

jcferguson 10-17-2005 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uwe

During daytime, in bright sun, the inside skins barely got warm to the touch.
I remember in similar situations, the inside skin of my tradewind getting good and warm to the touch, almost hot.
I think that so far I am very pleased with this method of insulation.


While I was installing (in full sun) I could feel the difference between the uninsulated skin and the insulation areas I was installing. The uninsulated skin could literally burn you I think, the insulation was only warm after heating for a quite a while.

I am planning on installing some cork underlayment on each rib before putting in the interior skin to create a thermal barrier, as those ribs conduct heat and condense water quite well. I am cutting the cork to about 5/8" widths and sticking it to the ribs with spray adhesive. The rivets will hold it in place so I am not to worried about the adhesive failing. I am hoping this will protect the interior skin from the water that condenses in the morning.

Carlos

jcferguson 10-17-2005 10:09 PM

Floorplan iteration one
 
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I hope to have my trailer serve dual function as a live/work space. I am trying to cram the living space into as small a section as possible in order to maximize work area (there is never enough of this). I think I will install the living part initially and just use knock down tables in the rear until I have an idea what to build.

The floorplan here is my first attempt, I hope some comments will make me think of some possibilities that I have overlooked. I realize I could make the rear end exclusively work space by making the front dinette some kind of larger bed/couch pullout, but I really like the idea of a bed in back and am not quite ready to give this up. I think it would be good to have two bed spots just in case as well.

Any thoughts on this layout? Left end is front.

A-Merry-Can 10-18-2005 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcferguson
...I am hoping this will protect the interior skin from the water that condenses in the morning...

hey carlos,

check my post for a pic of the condensation that happens on teh inside of my roof and see if yours is similar. i really want to figure out a way to keep that to a minimum. the other morning, there was so much condensation on the inside of the skin of mine that it was running down to the floor. there's got to be a way to keep the condensation down. i like your method with the cork.

where did you get the roll insulation? Lowes has it for something like $50 a roll. there's got to be a better supplier.

jp

jcferguson 10-18-2005 08:13 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by A-Merry-Can
hey carlos,

check my post for a pic of the condensation that happens on teh inside of my roof and see if yours is similar. i really want to figure out a way to keep that to a minimum.

where did you get the roll insulation? Lowes has it for something like $50 a roll. there's got to be a better supplier.

jp

JP - The condensation is a result of the warm moist air in the trailer hitting the cold-in-the-morning metal of the skin - the water condenses. When my trailer was gutted it looked just like yours, wet all over in the morning, and I was pretty worried and couldn't figure how the thing had kept from rotting completely from the inside out. I installed the foil insulation though, and no more condensation. This makes sense as the only water that would be able to condense on the outer skin would be the water that is trapped in the air between the skin and insulation. The insulation itself doesn't get cold like the skin did, so no major condensation insulation inside either.

This was illustrated when I was half done - the part that was just skin one morning was wet, but the insulated area was not. I wondered if the water was just under the insulation against the skin, there but hidden, so I peeled up some insulation: dry skin. There was a very small bit of moisture on the insulation, but nothing compared to what was on the raw skin. I figure with the internal skin in the effect will be even better.

The ribs, on the other hand, are another matter, and condense despite the insulation, hence my attempts with the cork... I will let you know how it goes.

Lowes was my source, I think it was 40-something here. I needed exactly four rolls of that size you are talking about for my entire trailer with a tiny bit left over. You might need only three, my trailer is 19' long inside... I taped cut-offs back together to make some new pieces.

C

A-Merry-Can 10-18-2005 01:08 PM

cool, thanks man. i'll probably be getting to the insulation stage in a few weeks. actually, i could probably go ahead and do the end caps for starters. i still have 2 upper side skins to go.

let me make sure i get this straight... you cut little foam blocks to put on the skin, then the bubble insulation goes in, and more foam blocks to keep it suspended evenly between the inner and outter skin... then seal up the edges as uwe suggests with aluminum tape. (after i run all the wires, of course). did i miss anything there?

the only place i'm mildly concerned is around the exhaust for the stove. i'm sure a hot pipe running through the plastic bubble wrap isn't the keenest idea.

on your floorplans, i bet i did 10 different directions before i came up with something i like. i drew basic block sizes for everything and moved it arround (in adobe illustrator), until i got teh maximum useable floor space, and all the details tucked as close together as posible. one thing i didn't like much in friend's trailers was the cave feel it made when you have 2 tall cabinets side by side, so i kept mine to a minimum. also, another concern for me was to have enough space in the front to comfortably entertain 4 adults (and a baby!). i like a lot of floor space there, if at all possible. it gives it a much more open feel.

what's the work space for, btw? just curious?

jp

jcferguson 10-18-2005 07:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by A-Merry-Can
let me make sure i get this straight... you cut little foam blocks to put on the skin, then the bubble insulation goes in, and more foam blocks to keep it suspended evenly between the inner and outter skin... then seal up the edges as uwe suggests with aluminum tape. (after i run all the wires, of course). did i miss anything there?

the only place i'm mildly concerned is around the exhaust for the stove. i'm sure a hot pipe running through the plastic bubble wrap isn't the keenest idea.

what's the work space for, btw? just curious?

jp

1- The definitive tract on the insulation was written by Malconium - I think it is under foil bubble insulation methods if you search. I used foam insulation for the spacers "foamular" a 1" thick 4x8" sheet cut to 1/2" strips on the table saw, then used heavy duty construction adhesive (I found some polyurathane stuff that was quite strong but expensive, something like 20 tubes were used!) to stick up the spacers. I only used spacers on the backside, the stuff is held pretty tightly to the spacers and I don't think there is any reason for the second set of spacers. I put in the wires after insulating, if I ever need to get at them it will be one less layer to dig through... Ask if you have any questions about this... It was a fairly pleasurable activity I found.

2- I plan on cutting the insulation back about 12" from my woodstove pipe and stuffing in some mineral board in that space - an anti-flame sort of stuff that should be fine closer to the heat of the pipe...

3- Painting, drawing, making things in general. www.carlosferguson.com if you are interested. (make sure to click on the images on the 2005 page for the full effect)

c

jcferguson 10-21-2005 04:38 PM

Wood Endcaps
 
6 Attachment(s)
I used baltic birch for a sculpture I made recently, bent around a frame and screwed (see pic below) and I have been thinking about that curved wood studded with silver screws for my airstream (change to rivets though).

I called a friend who just bought a 52' and had her measure her endcaps on the inside so that I had something to start with.

I marked out these measurements on the window and first main rib and used a long piece of bendy baltic birch to trace a line between them. (see pic)

I used tar paper to make a paper pattern of these sections - I cut it close to size, taped it up with duct tape, then cut slits and folded back little sections to aproximate the line that I had drawn earlier. (pic)

I then transferred these flat sheets to the birch ply to make patterns that I will use to cut my "real" pieces. I laid out and outlined the tarpaper on the ply, then used a bandsaw and belt sander to make the edges into nice smooth curves.

I tacked these pieces up with clecos to make sure it was working and then added a few rivets just to see how it would look.

I think it will work, the rivets grab well into the wood, snug and seated without tearing the fibers - and the wood bends just a bit to give a nice "quilted" sensation that I tried to show in another picture. The patterns aren't perfect and I might make some small adjustments, or I might leave it the way it is, you know, to look hand made and all... I would like to blame these little defects on my friend's tape measure, but I am sure it is mismeasuring on my part.

I bought 20 sheets of this 5' x 5' 1/8" baltic ply and put three coats of poly on the back for waterproofing and two on the front - after I install I will put on the last coat on the front, I think this might allow me to clean up any dings and dirt before putting on that last coat.

Carlos

uwe 10-21-2005 09:09 PM

Carlos,
Watching your progress is pure joy!
You do nice work!

A-Merry-Can 10-22-2005 05:54 AM

this is looking awesome! 13 panels is definitely the way to go if you are using real plywood. after taking my caps out, and seeing the compound curving in them, there's no way to make a 7 panel work with wood. not in any easy way that i can think of, at least. i'll be laminating mine. this will be interesting to see how differently ours turn out.

lookin great, man!

jp

3Ms75Argosy 10-22-2005 08:49 AM

How...
 
did you get the 1/8th" ply to bend on that art project that you did? Is there just a curved frame (without studs) that the ply is screwed to? Did you steam the wood first? Looks fantastic! How did it look finished?
Awesome work!
Marc

jcferguson 10-22-2005 10:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 3Ms75Argosy
did you get the 1/8th" ply to bend on that art project that you did? Is there just a curved frame (without studs) that the ply is screwed to? Did you steam the wood first? Looks fantastic! How did it look finished?
Awesome work!
Marc

The baltic birch will curve around a frame like that with no steam - it is quite strong and flexible, probably down to about a 10" radius or so. I cut a circle, than another circle like a rabbet (if you know what that means) inside the first and clamped the plywood to the inner circle and screwed. It was a little more complex because I wanted that figure eight shape, but basically just careful cutting with a router. I used two layers of the 1/8" ply for strength. I usually use paste wax on birch as it isn't so great with oil, blotchy. For my interior though I am going to poly, I just want a little more protection in that potentially damp enviroment.

jcferguson 10-25-2005 03:51 PM

Wood Endcap Installation
 
3 Attachment(s)
I put in the rear endcap and general area today... here are some pictures. It looks nice, warm in color which will help over the next few months as it turns grey here. It was a bit of a job getting everything lined up and now I am pretty sure I don't want to punch holes in that area for the above-window shelf with lights that I had planned. The wood rivets nicely and is quite solid. I used cork spacers for part of this installation, they work well with the wood, but I am not sure I would use them for an aluminum interior, it compresses just a bit and the aluminum might not have enough stiffness to stay relatively flat.

uwe 10-25-2005 05:29 PM

Carlos,

Did you save the patterns by any chance? I might do this on my , ah, err, next project........
Looks great!

jcferguson 10-25-2005 05:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uwe
Carlos,

Did you save the patterns by any chance? I might do this on my , ah, err, next project........
Looks great!

I'll save them, if it all works out I'm sure someone will want to use them at some point... The front end is a different shaped curve I think so I might have to make another set over the next few days...

C

A-Merry-Can 10-26-2005 07:50 AM

bravo! this looks awesome! i agree with not wanting to punch holes in it. it's got a nice, clean finished look as it is now. are you planning on doing the side walls with the same wood treatment? BEAUTIFUL work, man! i love it!

jp

jcferguson 10-28-2005 12:33 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by A-Merry-Can
bravo! this looks awesome! i agree with not wanting to punch holes in it. it's got a nice, clean finished look as it is now. are you planning on doing the side walls with the same wood treatment? BEAUTIFUL work, man! i love it!

jp

Yes, the wood will cover everything interior... I am on the front endcap now which is seeming easier - there is a little trick to installing the panels that I figured out on the rear, I will detail this later with some pictures. Though the front cap is only 3' deep and the rear is 4' I think the same templates are going to work with just a little more overlapping in places.

Thanks for the kind words - what a solitary exercise this would be without this site, no?

Carlos

t.gray 10-31-2005 04:18 PM

Carlos,
The wood caps look nice although I must confess my tape measure is a bit rusty and difficult to read.
Your airstream is really coming along beautifully. It's nice checking out your progress.
Theresa

jcferguson 11-02-2005 04:16 PM

Wood Install Pictures
 
4 Attachment(s)
I've been working on my interior wood skin - here are some new pictures:

I feel quite certain at this point that the wood will have more than enough strength to substitute for the aluminum interior skin.

I used a couple different boards on this front cap to make it look striped. I was worried that the places where the wood overlapped and created a gap would be ugly, but I think they look fine, a kind of organic shape to the gap... I buck rivetted a bit around the door to make sure this would work (buck rivetting wood) and it is fine as well. I might make some kind of trim ring for the door or I might just leave it like this. Rivets will go in first, then I will cut and sand the wood back to the door - this will keep the ply from splintering at the edges.

One picture is of the back cap - you can see how the facets reflect the light.

I am hoping to have the walls in by this weekend - it is a little slow going as I have to figure out where to punch the wires through the walls as I install.

Ken J 11-02-2005 05:04 PM

Wow very nice - I guess I stand corrected - I was the one who thought that wood may not have the strength similar to the original alum.

Ken J.

jcferguson 11-02-2005 06:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ken J
Wow very nice - I guess I stand corrected - I was the one who thought that wood may not have the strength similar to the original alum.

Ken J.

Ken,

I wouldn't say corrected... I think yours is a valid concept - I just think this particular kind of wood in this particular application will be sufficient... I am not sure how I would feel about removing the alum. skin on a longer trailer. The frame, it seems to me, does relatively more work on a shorter trailer. As the trailer gets longer and longer there is more and more length (and weight) in front of and behind the axle. Before getting to this point I also added some metal to my frame making it a bit stiffer and have stronger wood on the floor (further stiffening the frame) than factory. I replaced outside skin metal (stock .032) with .040.

I don't know of anyone else that thinks this is a good idea (removing the interior aluminum) so you are in the majority...

Carlos

jcferguson 11-06-2005 08:53 PM

3 Attachment(s)
My interior skin installation is progressing, if slowly. Yesterday I finished the "lower level" of wood and today I have been thinking about the big hole I have to punch through the ceiling for my stove-pipe. I set up the things that I do have in the space (which make for a funny picture) to finalize where the stove will go. It will be pretty much centered on the curb side counter. I hope this will make for even heating. I put a picture of my hand in one shot to show how tiny this stove is.

A double layer of wood around the wires coming through the wall should act something like a grommet - the edges are sanded. They look pretty neat, though I think they will all be hidden from view.

uwe 11-06-2005 09:02 PM

Carlos,
Did you mention which type of wood you were using? It looks really nice. I might go look for it to use for my cabinet door skins. I like the figure in the grain.

jcferguson 11-06-2005 09:04 PM

6 Attachment(s)
After getting the stove where I wanted it, I used a plumb line to figure where to put this hole in the roof and drilled one tiny little hole through to the sky.

My father has a lathe in his shop and I turned a fitting for my roof from white oak. This wood fitting will attach to the roof with screws from below - and then a threaded "deck fitting" will screw to the wood on the outside. The deck fitting has a nice looking chrome stovepipe for cold weather and a threaded cap with rubber seal for driving and summer. I like the idea of being able to remove the stove pipe for travel, I imagine tearing it off on a low branch...

After turning the wood fitting I used a bandsaw, belt sander, and finally rasp to make the piece conform to the roof. Tomorrow I will put it up there and cut a 6" hole in my roof! Yikes! On the inside I will put fireproof insulation between the skins for a radius of 12 inches or so and some aluminum trim/shielding over the wood as it nears the pipe. There will be gap between the wood and the pipe so that air can circulate for cooling.

Also, a picture of the water fill I am going to use for the fresh water tank - a boat fitting as well. My feeling, after doing a lot of searching for components like this, is that boat stuff is really nice.. and really expensive.

jcferguson 11-06-2005 09:17 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uwe
Carlos,
Did you mention which type of wood you were using? It looks really nice. I might go look for it to use for my cabinet door skins. I like the figure in the grain.

Uwe, this is baltic birch ply, 1/8" - it comes in 1/4 as well, up to 1". 5'x5' sheets and a funny little insignia on the back that looks kind of cyrillic but is maybe Finnish?

I like the figure in the grain too - I don't know if I just got lucky, but most every sheet was interesting in some way. I saved some polka dot looking pieces for the ceiling. The back part is "bookmatched" - symmetrical figuring in the cap piece - but I don't know if it will really be visible, it is kind of subtle.

By the way, I'll send off those old vents to you tomorrow.

Carlos

Ken J 11-06-2005 09:36 PM

Carlos

I just saw the respose to my earlier comment - putting thinker skin on the outside seems to me to be a good thing - it would add to the overall stiffness. I agree (I had an 18 footer) that a smaller trailer does not flex as much - this 26 footer of mine really flexes........ whats interesting it has the exact same frame (except longer) as my 18 did. So between the beefed up frame and thicker skin - you should be in great shape. You'll have to let us know after you get some miles on how things are holding up - one thing non-airstream restorers are saying is that the vintage airstreams are too "cold" inside - you seems to be solving that issue.............

Ken J

jcferguson 11-07-2005 08:46 PM

Charlie Noble up top
 
3 Attachment(s)
The 'stack is on top after today, I will spare the forum the pictures of the hole-cutting in progress, a ragged 6 inch gash in the roof of my 'stream.

After that (and a lot of rasping on the wood fitting to get it to conform nicely) I doubled up the skin where the fittings will sit and evened up the hole with a file from the inside, screwed on the wood fitting and screwed the metal fitting to the wood fitting. Screwed in the smokestack and looks pretty good - very solid and level.

On the inside, the 3" stovepipe will slip up into the finned heat sink. I will step the interior skin an additional inch away from the pipe (there will be about 2" clearance around the pipe), insert a metal sheild, and pack fire resistant insulation between the skins to protect my meltable foil bubble insulation. I think making this shield will be a little tricky. A good job for tomorrow.

59toaster 11-07-2005 09:30 PM

Thats impressive! Can't wait to see the finished product.

jcferguson 11-11-2005 02:53 PM

Wood
 
4 Attachment(s)
The skins are finally in - I will finish up the rivetting and put on the final coat of poly next. Then floor.

The door has a trim of 1" aluminum around the edge, the windows and vents will have the same.

MarkR 11-11-2005 07:47 PM

Carlos,
Spectacular!
Can you tell me your source for the Water Fill Fitting?
Thanks,
Mark

jcferguson 11-11-2005 10:01 PM

Water Fill
 
Mark:

Water fill source - pricey but very solid - the cap is attached to the fitting with a little chain and has a rubber seal on the inside:

http://www.sailboatstuff.com/plumb_deckfill.html

If you do a google search for "deck fill" you will find some other alternatives.

jcferguson 11-16-2005 01:16 PM

Snow
 
1 Attachment(s)
Snow in Iowa.

jcferguson 11-23-2005 05:27 PM

Cork
 
5 Attachment(s)
The cork floor is in, I cut up 12" tiles on a table saw, glued them down in a pattern and then it got very cold (7 degrees) just as I was about to put on the poly - I stacked hay bales around the base and put a space heater inside and another underneath and then kept the floor above 60 degrees. Then, when I finished, it got back up to 50 degrees outside.

I made a threshold for the door from 1/8 x 2" L stock aluminum, now I am working on trim for windows and fantastic vents.

uwe 11-23-2005 08:05 PM

Great job, Carlos. This is good stuff!
Happy Thanksgiving!

jcferguson 11-23-2005 08:14 PM

Thanks Uwe, same to you.

Carlos

flyfshr 11-23-2005 09:02 PM

I think the designers at the factory should see what you've been up to. It's outstanding! I'd really like to see it in person.

Brad
FF

jcferguson 11-24-2005 02:57 PM

Trim
 
5 Attachment(s)
Window trimming is slow work. I would like to figure a way to avoid the cut in the side pieces that allows the trim to follow the curve of the trailer, but unless I make a separate fillet for each piece to bring the trailer curve to flat I suppose this will do. At least on most windows they will be covered, more or less, by the window crank. They look industrial, which I do like. Maybe when I get going it will go a little faster, all the sides of the windows are the same dimensions.

uwe 11-24-2005 03:52 PM

Carlos,
All my windows have flat sides to them on the inside. There is a piece of c-channel right next to the window, between the inner and outer skin, usually held in place with the same rivets that hold the interior window frame. I think it looks nice, especially since the glass for our trailers has no curve to it. It does not seem to distort the inner skin in any way.
Why don't you keep the frames flat, see what it looks like? I would not like the cut being visible if this was my project.
I agree, the industrial look against the visually very soft wood is very attractive.
Alternatively, you could cut little triagular shaped fillers and clean up the edges real nice, then rivet them over the slot to cover the gap.

jcferguson 11-24-2005 05:26 PM

Uwe,

On most of my windows a rib is the nearest supporting member - with a space of 2 or 3 inches where the skin "floats" next to the window. The trim is rivetted to this floating skin and it sort of anchors things together. The skin is relatively strong in these places because of the nearby rib.

The rib, however, is curved and so the skin has a bit of a curve to it as well. The original trim was split in two places top and bottom - this allowed the trip to conform. I thought about just putting a flat straight piece in and hoping the bend would be split between the skin and trim... I will try this tomorrow and see how it looks. It sounds like this is how your trailer trim is put together?

I think it is a choice between rivetting the trim until it conforms (which involves some scrunching and bending of the strim) or cutting and rivetting (no scrunching, but visible cut). Dang these organic shaped trailers!

I also might try the "cut cover" you suggest and see if it looks any better.

Thanks for the advice. If you have any pics of your trim handy, would you mind posting them? If not, next time you take pictures...

Thanks,

Carlos

uwe 11-24-2005 07:42 PM

Carlos,
I e-mailed you some pictures with my window frames in them.

jcferguson 11-24-2005 07:49 PM

Trim Trim
 
1 Attachment(s)
I think Uwe's second idea works well. I tried to put a straight piece of trim in (with no cut) but the curve was too great. Instead I will cover the cuts with a small piece of metal. When everything is together I think they will look ok - more industrial still...

uwe 11-24-2005 07:52 PM

I think that looks sharp.

malconium 11-28-2005 01:38 PM

Carlos,

Somehow I managed to entirely miss this thread until today. Your use of the plywood looks very nice. I can not imagine that there would be any structural problems with this approach given the shorter length of your trailer, all the extra re-enforcement you did to the frame, the use of the thicker extrior skins and the much larger number of rivets you used. Your enterior looks very warm and inviting with all the wood.

I am very tempted to consider using the type of mini wood stove you are using. It is a really neat looking little stove. I still think that I want to do the radiant heat in the floor though but I am still going to think about it.

I hope to get back to doing some work on my interior - maybe even some today. I am putting my aluminum skins back in and I have both the ends with the end caps back in place. I am glad to hear that the foil insulation is working so well for you. I have been very happy with the part that I have installed so far. I do think that it takes longer to install than fiberglass would but I very much like the results. I decided to put my wires on the inside of the foil as well. Did you do anything in particular to anchor the wires so they would not flop around?

Malcolm

jcferguson 11-28-2005 01:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by malconium
Carlos,
Did you do anything in particular to anchor the wires so they would not flop around?

Malcolm

Malcolm,

I used some of the foil tape to stick the wires in position. I think this means I won't be able to fish any wire later but the chances of that working anyway seem so slim that I am not worrying about it. I just stuck a bit of the tape over the wire anyplace that it seemed droopy.

You can see in an earlier picture that the snow melted off the top only where the ribs connected (this despite my cork spacers). I think this means the insulation is working pretty well - it was pretty warm inside the trailer and pretty cold outside when I took the picture. It's fun to be in a warm trailer when it is snowing, I can't wait to get the stove in - hopefully this week.

Carlos

jcferguson 11-29-2005 04:14 PM

Windows Trimmed
 
3 Attachment(s)
The window trim is in. Next is a trim ring for the stovepipe and installation of the shore power jack and the trailer umbilical jack.

Then I suppose I will have to start building.

A-Merry-Can 11-29-2005 05:46 PM

looks like i have some catching up to do! ha! looks awesome, man! REALLY nice!

:D

jordan

squrlgurl 11-29-2005 10:35 PM

I kinda like it like it is now....a futon and a candle on the middle and you have a zen thing happening :rolleyes:

Awesome job and interesting thread!

-Tracey

jcferguson 11-30-2005 02:16 PM

4 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by squrlgurl
I kinda like it like it is now....a futon and a candle on the middle and you have a zen thing happening :rolleyes:

Awesome job and interesting thread!

-Tracey

Just before I read this I was considering moving my futon from my minivan (which is more creepy than zen) into the airstream so that I could be warmer at night. It's been about 20 degrees here. I might wait until I get the stove in though, then I won't need the candle... Incense though, that would zen it out, huh? And it might cover the slight smell of poly, construction adhesive, seam sealer...

Today I trimmed the woodstove exit - first with a donut shaped piece of aluminum rivetted to the skin to reflect heat, then with a wave shaped piece of metal that I fit to the roof - it is mounted on the tabs you can see in the picture below. The surrounding area between the skins is filled with fiberglass insulation to create a big buffer between my meltable foil bubble insulation and the stovepipe. I think this will work well, but if it gets too hot up there when I get the stove in I can rework it to create more buffer.

jcferguson 11-30-2005 04:47 PM

electric service
 
1 Attachment(s)
The electrical jack is in, near the front so that all my electric wires can be in the same spot. The jack is just long enough to extend through the wall to the otherside - underneath the doorside dinette.

The trailer umbilical will plug in just below the electric jack.

A-Merry-Can 12-11-2005 04:48 PM

looking good, man! i'm hoping to be wiring stuff here this winter. i just finished putting the wheel well trim on, via your method... i'm very pleased with the results. see what you think. i ran the trim pieces completely under the trailer body. That was a bit tricky, but worth it i think.

jordan

malconium 12-12-2005 07:03 PM

Very easy to install wheel well trim...
 
Are you guys maybe working way to hard on your wheel well trim? Maybe the way you guys did it is an AS purist thing but I found a way that is far easier.

For my wheel well trim I used door edge molding that I found at an auto supply store. This stuff may not be as tough as aluminum (maybe it is though) but it was definitely very easy to install and looks great. It would be a cinch to re-install too if it ever needs replacement. It is basically U-shaped and has a little bead of adhesive in the bottom of the U that is activated by taping the trim into place with a rubber mallet.

As I said I bought mine at an auto parts store locally but it looks like some of the products on the following website. Mine came with about 30' in a package I think.

http://trimlok.com/SearchResult.aspx?CategoryID=21

What do you think?

Malcolm

flyfshr 12-12-2005 07:12 PM

Malcolm -

That's what my Trade Wind had on it originally but it must have been several years old and it was cloudy and the plastic coating was coming off. I chose aluminum so i wouldn't have to bother with it again.

Brad
FF

jcferguson 12-12-2005 07:14 PM

Malcolm,

looks like it would look good to me, if I had known about that product pre-installation I might have used it... do you have any pictures of your wheel wells after you installed? Is it plastic or metal?

Carlos

jcferguson 12-12-2005 07:27 PM

Dinette
 
6 Attachment(s)
These photos detail the ongoing construction of the dinette.

The framework is 3/4" baltic birch screwed to the floor in a few places, then screwed to the bendy piece I made to screw to the curved wall. The curve at the corner was made with a router circle cutting jig. I built it all in place, but the entire thing can be removed with a few screws.

The sheathing is the same as my interior 1/8" baltic birch. There are two layers of wood for strength. The first was brad-nailed in place, the second was contact cemented to the first so I could avoid fasteners if possible. I will see how the cement holds up - I can always add a row of screws through the skin later if necessary.

The covers for these compartments are 1/4" ply, which seems to be strong enough when supported as it is on all sides. It adds a little bounce to the seat. I cut each to size individually, fine tuning the fit with a belt sander.

I will make some cushions for the tops of the seats, then another set for the backs.

I think this setup will give me the largest bed and storage space though perhaps it would have been more comfortable with a straight back to the seats. I do like sitting in the curve of the trailer though, you can move around until you are comfortable relative to the table space.

59toaster 12-12-2005 08:01 PM

Is your coach going to have a water tank?

malconium 12-12-2005 08:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by flyfshr
Malcolm -

That's what my Trade Wind had on it originally but it must have been several years old and it was cloudy and the plastic coating was coming off. I chose aluminum so i wouldn't have to bother with it again.

Brad
FF

I guess time will tell how long the stuff I put on will last...

jcferguson 12-12-2005 08:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 59toaster
Is your coach going to have a water tank?

I made spaces for large-ish fresh and grey tanks under the frame (you can see them in earlier pictures).

jcferguson 12-13-2005 12:09 PM

Electrical Layout
 
3 Attachment(s)
This is the electric layout I have planned. Is this right?

Questions I still have:

1

Is the breaker box configuration correct? My understanding is that the shore power in will enter the 30 amp breaker at the bottom and this will function as my "main". This will then feed the two 15 amp breakers which will go out to my circuits.

2

Do I need to ground the breaker box or just tie all the ground wires together? It seems like 120 system is just a glorified extension cord and since the shore power line is presumeably grounded, couldn't I just rely on that? How can the trailer be grounded anyway with rubber tires?

3

With the 12v system can I just tie the grounding bar to the trailer skin once or do I need to ground the battery directly as well? Is the trailer skin sufficient or do I need to tie to the frame too?

Thanks for any help,

Carlos

MarkR 12-13-2005 03:14 PM

Carlos,
This guy's website has info about wiring . . . you may have already seen it. Since I'm not to that point yet I don't know how helpful the info is, I'm keeping the link for the future. Sorry I can't answer any of your questions as they are questions I have or will have.
Great Work by the way.
Mark

http://www.ccis.com/home/mnemeth/tech.htm

uwe 12-13-2005 06:39 PM

Right On!
 
Carlos,
Looks like you got this licked....all three diagrams make sense.

jcferguson 12-14-2005 01:24 PM

Uwe, do you think I need a fuse between the batteries and the converter/charger? The converter/charger has a couple fuses on the front for reverse connection protection and I assume these would blow if anything went wrong. How about a fuse between the coverter/charger and the dc distribution box? Not needed because everything is fused there as well?

Carlos

uwe 12-14-2005 08:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcferguson
Uwe, do you think I need a fuse between the batteries and the converter/charger? The converter/charger has a couple fuses on the front for reverse connection protection and I assume these would blow if anything went wrong. How about a fuse between the coverter/charger and the dc distribution box? Not needed because everything is fused there as well?

Carlos

Depends..
I am running a Intellipower, which indeed has a dual fused output. However, the big lugs for the battery cables are paralleled, meaning that they will not affect the fuses inside the Intellipower at all. If the intellipower has a short, then the fuses should blow, but that does not take the battery out of the equation. If the feed wire, or the fuse panel itself has a short ( rare, I guess) then it's barbeque time...
Since you're at it, might as well add a 40 or 60A fuse( depends on your wire gauge) to the circuit.
Link the fuse between the battery and the charger, and then go from the charger to the fuse panel. Then, the line is protected all the way from the battery to the fuse panel, with the converter in between.
Better safe than sorry.

Ken J 12-15-2005 08:03 AM

Uwe

Do you know if there is a chart around that shows 12v fuse size vs wire?

Ken

uwe 12-15-2005 09:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ken J
Uwe

Do you know if there is a chart around that shows 12v fuse size vs wire?

Ken

It's actually the other way around, which gauge wire can handle how many amps, at which wire length.
There was a link right here at the forums about that, which I referred to when I laid out my DC system. I do not know where that is any longer.

As a rule, you should not need DC fuses over 15A for anything but the chargeline and perhaps an EH actuator, if applicable.
Running 12G and fusing that circuit with a 15A fuse is safe at just about any wire length in a vintage Airstream.
So, if you run 12G wiring from the fuse panel to the circuits, you should be fine.
Then, yu can fine tune the circuits with appropriate size fuses. Add up what's on the circuit, and use the fuse closest to that need.

3Ms75Argosy 12-16-2005 06:04 PM

Carlos...
 
I'm in just awe with your work! If I may, how does your router cutter work for making the curve for the dinette? From the photos, I see you cut small sections to make the wood frame curve around the front of the trailer, but how do you make the freestanding curve in the frame at the front of the dinette set? What size wood did you start with for the frame? It looks like two sections sandwiched together? Like Uwe, it seems like you use the kreg tool as well to make the frame - no biscuts, right?

Again, just fantastic work!
Marc

uwe 12-16-2005 06:14 PM

Hey Carlos,
I received my wheel well moldings from your source today. That's nice stuff. I can also use it in the interior where my stainless panels will have a visible edge. I bought 2 12ft lengths, cut at 8ft for shipping cost relief.
i will have a little left over from the 8ft sections, plus the 2 4ft sections for the interior. It's really tight on the .040, but will slip over the edge.
Very nice material, btw. the edge will have a very subtle, but elegant finish on it. Thanks for the link!
Uwe

jcferguson 12-17-2005 11:51 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by 3Ms75Argosy
I'm in just awe with your work! If I may, how does your router cutter work for making the curve for the dinette? From the photos, I see you cut small sections to make the wood frame curve around the front of the trailer, but how do you make the freestanding curve in the frame at the front of the dinette set? What size wood did you start with for the frame? It looks like two sections sandwiched together? Like Uwe, it seems like you use the kreg tool as well to make the frame - no biscuts, right?

Again, just fantastic work!
Marc


Thanks Marc!

Yes, I like my Kreg jig... I have a friend with a cabinet shop that has a hydraulic powered version that sort of clamps and drills automatically when you pull a lever. Those are about 800$ though, I will need to renovate a few more airstreams before I move to that model.

You can get circle cutting jigs for a router for not too much money (do a google search for router circle jig) If you can't find anything I can look up the kind I have and send you a link. It is probably just as easy to make your own, which I do whenever I want to cut a circle that is bigger than my jig will cut. I use 1/4 inch plywood or masonite would work. I will attach a drawing below - basically you copy the face plate of your router onto a long piece of wood, then drill circles along the length of the jig for different sized circles. You drill a hole in the piece of wood in which you want to cut a circle, put a peg through the jig and into this hole and then swing the router 'round the circle, cutting a little at a time, lowering the bit with each circle.

I made all of the framework for the dinette out of 3/4 inch baltic birch plywood - this is a great structural material. I made two circles with my jig, stacked them and glued them together, then cut 1/4 out of each circle for the corners you are talking about. I used a belt sander to touch them up and then bent the 1/8 inch ply around the framework and attached with a brad nailer, then glued the second piece of 1/8 ply to the first.

Let me know if you need any more description of this process.

Carlos

jcferguson 12-17-2005 11:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by uwe
Hey Carlos,
I received my wheel well moldings from your source today. That's nice stuff. I can also use it in the interior where my stainless panels will have a visible edge. I bought 2 12ft lengths, cut at 8ft for shipping cost relief.
i will have a little left over from the 8ft sections, plus the 2 4ft sections for the interior. It's really tight on the .040, but will slip over the edge.
Very nice material, btw. the edge will have a very subtle, but elegant finish on it. Thanks for the link!
Uwe

I used a soft round wood mallet to persuade the trim to go around the skin (and wheel well metal). It was tight, which made the rivetting easier as I didn't have to try to hold it in place and rivet at the same time.

Carlos

jcferguson 12-17-2005 11:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ken J
Uwe

Do you know if there is a chart around that shows 12v fuse size vs wire?

Ken

Ken, here is a link that Mark Doane sent me - you can see dc wire amp size down the page a little bit - that amp capacity, I think, corresponds to where you would want to fuse the wire so that the fuse blows before the wire melts.

http://www.cmsquick.com/Tech.html

jcferguson 12-19-2005 05:55 PM

3 Attachment(s)
My kitchen is pictured here, drawer-less as it will be for a while I imagine. My counters are 39" tall so I won't have to bend over to wash dishes. I suppose I will get a step for shorter folk.

Under the woodstove will be a stair-shaped drawer for wood, next over will be a 6" pull out pantry, then the water heater and a shallow drawer under the stove, a stack of smallish drawers in the tall empty space and two large drawers for the last space - the sink will be there. ...though I was thinking today I could put the sink on the other side by the bathroom and put the icebox under the counter on the kitchen side. This would allow me to have all my water needs on one side and a larger kitchen counter. It would cut down on some work-space counter top though.

Does anyone know how this type of stove is "supposed" to be supported? I made my cut-out the suggested size, and the result is that the stove is supported by the metal flange at the top and sort of floats otherwise. I wonder if I should shim up the bottom to provide some support from down there? Any ideas? Uwe, what does yours look like support-wise?

Carlos

uwe 12-20-2005 09:15 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jcferguson
Does anyone know how this type of stove is "supposed" to be supported? I made my cut-out the suggested size, and the result is that the stove is supported by the metal flange at the top and sort of floats otherwise. I wonder if I should shim up the bottom to provide some support from down there? Any ideas? Uwe, what does yours look like support-wise?

Carlos

It "hangs" on it's metal lip, on the cutout in the countertop. My TradeWind had the same arrangement.
There should be screws going through the lip into the countertop to keep it from becoming independent of it's host.
My arrangement is not supported from the bottom either.


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