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-   -   Souped up Tahoe as TV (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f238/souped-up-tahoe-as-tv-152131.html)

SMWASONMYMD 06-11-2016 08:58 AM

Souped up Tahoe as TV
 
Another newbie question - we are learning about tow vehicles - and right now we are thinking 1 ton just because of safety and fact we are getting at a 28' or larger. We intend to have our two labs sit in the cab. But here is the problem - we wd also like to take friends along on various trips - so we really need to seat six- but am not interested in using a regular SUV and praying - particularly since we will be seating six.

I have heard mention of a Canadian shop that beefs up Tahoes (?) or some other SUV and that these can pull 28' AS.

My questions-

Who are they?

Do they really provide towing capabilities of a 3/4 or 1 ton - particularly on the downhills?

And how much do they set you back in the pocketbook?

Bgibbs 06-11-2016 09:37 AM

That Tahoe will require a LOT of "beefing up" to do what you want. Unless you have six small people, the Tahoe will either be overloaded or close to it (without the trailer). We briefly used a Yukon to tow a 24' offshore boat and it was always downshifting from 4th to 2nd at highway speeds. Not good.

RAH 06-11-2016 09:39 AM

Look up Duraburb in Florida.

dkottum 06-11-2016 09:58 AM

Can-Am RV will help you set up your Tahoe for towing, but everything has it's limits, even Airstreams which accommodate two people and a couple of kids nicely. Ask your friends to meet you at the campground, that way they can leave early when they get tired of living like a can of sardines.

Here's the site for Can-Am, it's about hitching, weight distribution, tires, shocks and driver technique. If your transmission shifts down constantly, select a lower gear and leave it there. Expect the engine to rev to higher rpm's when climbing hills for peak power range, and to get enough compression when shifting down to assist truck and trailer brakes downhill.

http://www.canamrv.ca/towing-expertise/

field & stream 06-11-2016 10:14 AM

Besides the debatable ability to tow a trailer that large and heavy with adequate performance with a Tahoe, you will almost certainly exceed the payload limits. This is not a set off risks I would even consider.

Welcome to the world of people wishing they still made 3/4 ton SUV's!

markdoane 06-11-2016 10:16 AM

I love my Tahoe and it's great for towing a 24' Tradewind.

But it's a really short wheelbase. I compensated for that by using an aftermarket hitch and going to the extreme with shortening the axle to hitch ball dimension.

You can repower it but I don't know how you would fix the wheelbase without going to an XL or Suburban.

Lots of PPP (pivot point projection) hitch users will now tell us that a Hensley or Pro Pride will fix all that.

J. Morgan 06-11-2016 10:22 AM

Souped up Tahoe as TV
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by markdoane (Post 1805001)

Lots of PPP (pivot point projection) hitch users will now tell us that a Hensley or Pro Pride will fix all that.


To the greatest extent, it will.

;)



Superat stultitia.

(FWIW, I wasn't going to say anything at all till I read what I just quoted)

#JustSayin...

Foiled Again 06-11-2016 10:27 AM

3/4 ton SUV
 
Quote:

Originally Posted by RAH (Post 1804988)
Look up Duraburb in Florida.

Second that.

My very first tow vehicle was a 2500 Suburban - 2003. In some ways I wish I still had it. (It was a gas HOG getting about 13 mpg when not towing and 11 when towing.) BUT OH my it towed smooth and nice with lots of storage space in the rear, and carried 6 people with the third seat down. And it was "car like" rather than truck-ish. Another thing that I liked was not having to buy a truck cap. Seems like you spend 50K on a new big truck, then another $5K to make it work as a tow vehicle/stow vehicle. The 2500 burb was all that off the factory floor.

The Dura burb is all that and a diesel with engine brakes. AND the newer 2500 diesels get 20 mpg on the open road when not towing (flat land Virginia but still).

Mercedes Benz and a long talk with Can-Am Andy if you want another alternative. Cha-Ching, too.

Happy Trails, Paula

Larry C 06-11-2016 12:21 PM

Sometimes, its a lot better decision to listen to people who have been towing trailers for years, instead of trying to reinvent the wheel....some of the newer 1/2 tons would handle a 28, maybe a 30' Airstream, if you really paid attention to the weight/balance/hitch....but for a bit more money, a 3/4 ton will do a lot better job. Diesel has it's advantage, and disadvantage, but overall, that's my first choice.

Projected point hitches are OK if you want to spend a lot of money $2,000 to $3,000 for a hitch that's difficult to hook up, and require constant maintenance. My personal preference is the Reese Straight Line (or Dual Cam). It's reasonably price, easy to set up and hook up.....

Most any vehicle will "pull" the trailer, but it takes a "tow" vehicle to safely tow it, and STOP it......stopping can be more important than "pulling" especially in heavy traffic, or downhill in mountains.

There are people on here who "pull" Airstreams with some of the damnedest combinations you'll ever think of.....thank God, I don't often have to contend with them in heavy traffic, or be ahead of them when they're on a 6 to 8% downhill decline....

For whatever it's worth...

Larry C

senioryakker 06-11-2016 12:37 PM

Use a 3/4 or 1 ton diesel, srw or drw crew cab for you and the dogs. Great for towing and stopping. Friends should follow in their own car.

rostam 06-11-2016 12:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Larry C (Post 1805058)
Sometimes, its a lot better decision to listen to people who have been towing trailers for years, instead of trying to reinvent the wheel....some of the newer 1/2 tons would handle a 28, maybe a 30' Airstream, if you really paid attention to the weight/balance/hitch....but for a bit more money, a 3/4 ton will do a lot better job. Diesel has it's advantage, and disadvantage, but overall, that's my first choice.

Projected point hitches are OK if you want to spend a lot of money $2,000 to $3,000 for a hitch that's difficult to hook up, and require constant maintenance. My personal preference is the Reese Straight Line (or Dual Cam). It's reasonably price, easy to set up and hook up.....

Most any vehicle will "pull" the trailer, but it takes a "tow" vehicle to safely tow it, and STOP it......stopping can be more important than "pulling" especially in heavy traffic, or downhill in mountains.

There are people on here who "pull" Airstreams with some of the damnedest combinations you'll ever think of.....thank God, I don't often have to contend with them in heavy traffic, or be ahead of them when they're on a 6 to 8% downhill decline....

For whatever it's worth...

Larry C


To the OP: this post provides excellent advice, and worth reading carefully.

kdickinson 06-11-2016 01:35 PM

If it were me - I'd get a tow vehicle I like and will be able to enjoy. Then I'd (and we do in fact) tell our friends to meet us where we will be and give them a list of nearby hotels ...

Our TV is a stock 1997 Tahoe LS 2-door and it does just fine all over Colorado ...

drboyd 06-11-2016 02:41 PM

We pulll the 25' Trade Wind with a 2005 Tahoe. It's not as fast uphill as I'd like, but I don't have stability issues. Of course, we don't have six people in it, either.

We use a Reese Dual Cam hitch.

KenBrodin 06-11-2016 03:27 PM

2003 Ford Excursion 6.0 diesel with anti sway bars and air springs. 28 ft FC. 380,000 miles strong with room for 4-7 passengers and more gear than you need. 17.8 mpg driving, 11.5 towing mountains at 70-75 mph. No blue def required.
KB


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