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-   -   Replacing '61 Safari vents with Fantastic fans (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f455/replacing-61-safari-vents-with-fantastic-fans-125035.html)

Airwave503 09-06-2014 09:26 PM

Replacing '61 Safari vents with Fantastic fans
 
1 Attachment(s)
The original vents are completely wasted and were probably leaking for a long time. The previous owners applied multiple sloppy layers of different kinds of roof tar/sealant which I have spent the last couple days scraping/chiseling it off. (tip: wait for a 94 degree day to soften it up)

Now I can finally get to the rivets.

I am debating whether to rivet the fantastic fans back on or use screws. I read a post where someone inserted a wood frame between the inner and outer skin to screw into.

Seems easier now and easier if they ever leak and need to be reinstalled or replaced.

Would love to hear your thoughts and maybe chat on the phone with anyone who has been through this. I am hustling to butting her up before the rainy season get here. Thanks! :)

batman 09-06-2014 11:04 PM

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Airwave503, I replaced the two in my 64 Safari. In the rear I put the one with the rain sensor and the standard up front. I used TremPro 626 sealant and screwed the new Fan-Tastic vents directly to the roof. No leaks.
I would think that putting a wood layer in between the vent and the roof would be asking for wood rot and problems down the road.
Easy to install, the cut out was the same size for the new vents. Put the new vent up and mark your mounting holes with a sharpie, make sure your wiring will reach, connect wires and test the fan, then remove the vent, drill the new holes, apply the TremPro liberally around the top of the cut out and holes, set the vent in place, making sure your wiring is in it's place, screw the new vent in place, clean up with mineral spirits, connect your wiring, attach the inside trim, repeat on the next vent.

-Dennis

Creampuff 09-07-2014 10:50 PM

I've done 3 so far and they are not difficult at all. I just shear off the rivet heads with a sharp chisel, pry out the orig. vent and cut out the corners of both skins. Use the gasket as a pattern.
The fan comes with adequate screws and there's no need to rivet anything. I recommend ordering the optional Airstream garnish trim as it has a curve that gives a better finish.
I'm going to be installing 3 more this week for clients.

overlander63 09-08-2014 05:07 AM

A Fantastic Story

Inland RV Center, In 09-08-2014 05:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Airwave503 (Post 1507173)
The original vents are completely wasted and were probably leaking for a long time. The previous owners applied multiple sloppy layers of different kinds of roof tar/sealant which I have spent the last couple days scraping/chiseling it off. (tip: wait for a 94 degree day to soften it up)

Now I can finally get to the rivets.

I am debating whether to rivet the fantastic fans back on or use screws. I read a post where someone inserted a wood frame between the inner and outer skin to screw into.

Seems easier now and easier if they ever leak and need to be reinstalled or replaced.

Would love to hear your thoughts and maybe chat on the phone with anyone who has been through this. I am hustling to butting her up before the rainy season get here. Thanks! :)

Good idea to replace the old with something new and very good.

Andy

Airwave503 09-09-2014 06:44 PM

Thanks for your replies so far, you guys are awesome!

So satisfying to get the dilapidated, rat-turd filled vents out! The rivet heads were so sunken that I could get to them from the top with a chisel. I drilled them out on the first vent, which left rivet material in the holes which I smoothed out with my grinder. On the second one I discovered I could sheer them off by tapping my painters tool under the vent flange. This was much faster and left clean holes behind. Now for the install and I have some questions.

1. I plan on rewiring the whole thing and wasn't going to start until I get it water tight. Any risk or disadvantage to installing the fans and wiring them in later?

2. Terry, in your article you talk about using Vulkem vs. the supplied foam gasket. Do you mean using Vulkem in addition to the foam gasket as shown in this video? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6LLI8DE-oko

3. Does anyone know if the screws supplied by Fantastic are stainless or how to tell? I want to go all stainless as I am near the ocean a lot.

Dennis, I appreciate your comment about avoiding wood. Every last piece of wood in this Safari was completely rotted and covered with mold. Especially in my PNW climate, wood just doesn't last. Creampuff, I did score the curved garish thanks, and Andy, about the only things not new about my Safari is going to be the trailer frame and the shell! :D

Creampuff 09-09-2014 10:46 PM

I just did another one today on a '69 Overlander. The screws supplied are not stainless, but flathead steel with white finished heads. It would not be easy to wire it after the install. The original wiring is usually #12 copper pigtailed off the lighting circuit and typically is already roughed in on the curbside, which is opposite to where the fan wires come out. The FF wires are smaller (#16?) and come with blue crimp connectors.
The usual supplied garnish is too deep and must be cut down by about half to fit- unless you have the 'Airstream garnish' trim.
One curveball today was that the International model version has an extra ceiling molding placed over the interior skins front to back and either garnish is held off the ceiling by about 1 3/4" because of the profile. Makes for not so nice a finish!
I installed the rain sensor model and tested it by dabbing my saliva wet finger on the sensor- and boy of boy it closed up like a clam!
I've read some other threads lately though that state it will not re-open automatically which some pet owners have concerns about. Apparently Atwood is working on that.
They also recommend NOT to omit the gasket- but compress it and caulk around with a polyurethane caulking.
The whole job today took 3.5 hrs but an hour and a half was cutting through the double interior skins.
I recommend good tinsnips plus both left and right aviation snips for a clean job.

batman 09-11-2014 10:09 AM

All good advice from Ceampuff. However I have found a Dremel tool and cutoff wheels are a better choice than tin snips or aviation snips. 2 cents..

overlander63 09-11-2014 10:26 AM

I use the Vulkem instead of the foam gasket. Some people have had better luck using the gasket and Vulkem together.

Airwave503 09-14-2014 12:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Creampuff (Post 1508583)
It would not be easy to wire it after the install. The original wiring is usually #12 copper pigtailed off the lighting circuit and typically is already roughed in on the curbside, which is opposite to where the fan wires come out. The FF wires are smaller (#16?) and come with blue crimp connectors.

Murray, I am planning to take out the most if not all of the interior skins to rewire and re-insulate. If I do that will it not be easy to wire the fans in after install?

My hope is to get it water proof so I can take my time with the electrical, insulation and other interior work over the winter. This would include getting these fans installed.

Thanks,
--Jason

Airwave503 10-06-2014 08:01 AM

I have some Tempro 535 on order, but I already have some Vulkem 116.

Should I wait for the Tempro 535, or would the Vulkem 116 work just as well?

Airwave503 10-06-2014 02:30 PM

Sorry I meant I have Trempro 635 on order. :blush:

Creampuff 10-06-2014 04:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Airwave503 (Post 1510427)
Murray, I am planning to take out the most if not all of the interior skins to rewire and re-insulate. If I do that will it not be easy to wire the fans in after install?

My hope is to get it water proof so I can take my time with the electrical, insulation and other interior work over the winter. This would include getting these fans installed.

Thanks,
--Jason

I have since done 1 more in another '69 OL and have determined that even w/o removing interior skins you can still find the wiring once it's installed. I tried using my Dremel with cutoff wheel but went back to the snips- probably because I'm using the small wheels. Another thing I believe would work would be an air nibbler, but I didn't have a compressor on site.
I use the gasket provided the caulk around, also dipping the screws before running them in and dabbing caulk over the head. I don't think it matters which brand. Vulcem works fine, but others can advise their opinion.
Incidentally- I highly recommend "Capt. Tolley's Creeping Crack Cure' for sealing hard to find and difficult leaks. It really works on rivets, window moldings, vents etc. Available online or at West Marine.


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