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-   -   F-150 EcoBoost? (http://www.airforums.com/forums/f463/f-150-ecoboost-107322.html)

Will_Brule 07-17-2013 04:59 PM

F-150 EcoBoost?
 
Our plan is to buy an AS Flying Cloud 25FB. It will be our first trailer so we have no experience other than moderate boats and such. I would like to tow with an F 150 with the 3.73 axle. Is this truck sufficient for the Ozarks, northern New Mexico, etc? Thanks for any advice you can provide.

DKB_SATX 07-17-2013 05:13 PM

An F150 Ecoboost with the 3.73 differential will be plenty. You won't be able to carry as much junk in the pickup bed as you would with a 1-ton, and someone will be along presently to tell you that towing an Airstream with one will cause your great grandparents to cease to exist at a moment before your grandparent was conceived or something similarly dire.

If you don't already have the F150, note that you can order certain models with the 3.73 limited-slip differential and the "HD Payload" package (Lariat, XLT or XL with the 156" wheelbase, I believe) and then you have about 75% of the payload capacity of an F250 without having to drive an F250 around when you're not towing, but you'll notice the extra wheelbase around town.

kevin242 07-17-2013 05:20 PM

Totally adequate.

wncrasher 07-17-2013 05:30 PM

a crew cab f-150 either ecoboost or the V8 will be more than adequate. You don't need to get the longbed either to get the HD tow package.

the ecoboost is desirable because of the torque curve. The power is down low in the rpm range where you want it and is fairly linear from there - like a diesel.

don't expect great mileage though, as when you are towing you will be under boost most of the time in hilly country. but unloaded, you can expect in the low to mid twenties.

DKB_SATX 07-17-2013 05:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wncrasher (Post 1328146)
a crew cab f-150 either ecoboost or the V8 will be more than adequate. You don't need to get the longbed either to get the HD tow package.

the ecoboost is desirable because of the torque curve. The power is down low in the rpm range where you want it and is fairly linear from there - like a diesel.

don't expect great mileage though, as when you are towing you will be under boost most of the time in hilly country. but unloaded, you can expect in the low to mid twenties.

There's no HD Tow. There are 2 distinct package, Max Tow and HD Payload. If you're talking about Max Tow, you're right... you can get that in most Ecoboost configurations of the truck. HD Payload seems to only come in the long wheelbase combinations (Regular Cab and Supercab with 8' bed, and SuperCrew with 6.5' bed.)

wncrasher 07-17-2013 05:49 PM

that's correct. he doesn't need the payload package, but I'd recommend the max tow.

switz 07-17-2013 06:13 PM

When pushing real numbers, also look at the Ford build information to see the deductions from payload as trim level goes up. One would loose over 450 pounds going from a bare truck to a King Ranch model.

Suddenly a 1900 pound payload less the 1,175 pound tongue weight of our 2013 25FB International (factory literature tongue weight was 833 pounds plus dealer installed awnings, solar panel and Hensley hitch head) did not leave much room for passengers, generators, gasoline, camping equipment, power cords etc. The base tongue weight for the 2013 25FB Flying Cloud is 837 pounds per the factory literature. The tow vehicle should have at least a 1,200 pound rated hitch along with towing mirrors and seven conductor trailer wiring harness.

Look for a dealership that has a lot of white fleet Fords for sale on their lot, Then there is a slight chance someone there will actually know something about trucks and towing. In my experience with Ford dealers, the typical sales staff is lucky to get their pants on correctly let alone be knowledgable about truck setups for towing.

Check the axle and tire ratings to ensure you have the strongest axles and appropriate tires (which would not be low profile or some passenger car rated tires).

JonS 07-17-2013 06:51 PM

Got a 2012 Ford 150 Super Crew FX4 4x4 with the 3.73's and Ecoboost engine and standard bed (157" wheelbase).

Max Trailer Weight is 9500.

Hitch Receiver - Ford Fleet Guide says 1130, sticker on my hitch on the truck says 1050. 2013 Tow Guide says 1130 also. Just saying, my truck disagrees :huh:

Link to 2012 Fleet Towing Guide -
http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...49405654,d.eWU.

First, don't buy an Eco for gas mileage. Consumer reports has even verified the Eco and V8 come up equal in the real world. My experience say the same. Do buy an Ecoboost if you want to laugh at V8's as you pull away effortlessly while their engines scream and wake up the neighborhood. Night and day, the Eco boost has torque. It's also freaky fast for a huge beast.

I towed a 2006 Jayco 29BHS for a year with the truck, just sold the trailer to prep for getting an AS. Gas milage from San Antonio TX to Walt Disney World and back was 264.5 Gallons used, 2583.7 Miles covered and average MPG of 9.7. That is all calculated by the truck computer and does include running around WDW while there. Used a Equalizer Hitch and when properly configured is was not a bad tow.

Changes I would make?

I would get rid of the 20" rims, it's a pain to get good towing tires for them. Came with the FX4 though. Other than that I love the truck and will probably use it to tow a 27FB when we are ready.

If you want HD Payload Package (should include MAX tow automatically), available in the Lariat, XL and XLT trims; take a look at the F250's first. Depending on the configuration, the cost can be more for the F150 than the F250. Sometimes depends on the discounts available to, the F150 can see some big cuts.

mojo 07-17-2013 08:06 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Willb43 (Post 1328134)
I would like to tow with an F 150 with the 3.73 axle. Is this truck sufficient for the Ozarks, northern New Mexico, etc? Thanks for any advice you can provide.

Turbos love mountains...

Not Done 07-17-2013 09:01 PM

How does the 3.5L eco boost engine compare to larger displacements ie 5.0L or 6.2L when using engine compression the slow the rig or maintian speed when coming down the mountains?

mojo 07-17-2013 10:25 PM

Truck has tow/haul mode which downshifts automatically based on your braking or you can downshift manually. Works for me on 10,000'+ passes with 6-10% grade.

Not Done 07-17-2013 10:50 PM

But how does that compare to a larger displacement with the same tow/haul mode?

graysailor 07-18-2013 03:25 PM

I am really impressed with the tow haul mode. Hardly touched the breaks going down hills as the tranny and engine do all of the thinking. The same can be said going up hill as there is no need to be concerned with overheating as again the tranny and engine do all of the thinking.

switz 07-18-2013 05:38 PM

Obviously the smaller Ford V6 engine lacks the cubic inches for engine braking as found in the Ford V8s.

If the rig comes close to 18,000 pounds like mine does with a 2500HD Dodge with the Cummins, a gas engine can not begin to generate the drag the diesel can.

BigAl 07-18-2013 06:43 PM

I find the engine braking in towhaul mode quite impressive for such a small engine. Obviously a large diesel engine will do better.
Al

switz 07-19-2013 01:37 PM

The really major difference in engine braking between gasoline and diesel power plants is the 10 to 1 compression on gasoline versus the 22 to 1 compression on diesel. :cool:

DKB_SATX 07-19-2013 02:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by switz (Post 1328852)
The really major difference in engine braking between gasoline and diesel power plants is the 10 to 1 compression on gasoline versus the 22 to 1 compression on diesel. :cool:

Or around 17:1, which is about what American pickup diesel engines run. Most of them are nearly 2x the displacement of an Ecoboost as well, so between pumping more air and compressing it harder, you'll get more drag from a diesel with the fuel turned back to idle. Most of those diesels are in trucks weighing 1500+ lb more than an F150 also, though, so you waste some of that engine braking just slowing the bigger truck.

Brad Burgess 07-19-2013 02:18 PM

Hello All

Based on my experience owning large diesels in Class A pushers I am pretty sure that diesels in and of themselves provide absolutely no compression braking as they are simply large air pumps. In order to achieve engine braking in the Class A's the unit must be equipped with either an exhaust brake or a "Jacobs" brake that acts on the valve train. Both units artificially create braking forces by either inducing exhaust back pressure (exhaust brake) or actual compression braking (Jake brake) coupled with automatic transmission downshifting. I am not sure why a pickup diesel would act differently. Certainly, many pickup diesels are equipped with exhaust brake units of some kind and these can be very effective.

Brad Burgess

DKB_SATX 07-19-2013 02:21 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Brad Burgess (Post 1328864)
Hello All

Based on my experience owning large diesels in Class A pushers I am pretty sure that diesels in and of themselves provide absolutely no compression braking as they are simply large air pumps. In order to achieve engine braking in the Class A's the unit must be equipped with either an exhaust brake or a "Jacobs" brake that acts on the valve train. Both units artificially create braking forces by either inducing exhaust back pressure (exhaust brake) or actual compression braking (Jake brake) coupled with automatic transmission downshifting. I am not sure why a pickup diesel would act differently. Certainly, many pickup diesels are equipped with exhaust brake units of some kind and these can be very effective.

Brad Burgess

The "air pump" you're describing provides a degree of compression braking, because you are in fact compressing the air (assuming the fuel is shut off or the delivery rate is down around the low-idle setting.) The 2 systems you describe will significantly increase the amount of braking the engine can produce, but some is there even without the optional exhaust brakes.

RamblinManGa 07-19-2013 02:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wncrasher (Post 1328146)
a crew cab f-150 either ecoboost or the V8 will be more than adequate. You don't need to get the longbed either to get the HD tow package.

the ecoboost is desirable because of the torque curve. The power is down low in the rpm range where you want it and is fairly linear from there - like a diesel.

don't expect great mileage though, as when you are towing you will be under boost most of the time in hilly country. but unloaded, you can expect in the low to mid twenties.

Hi from AZ. . . I have an '11 F150 EcoBoost with about 30k on it and I have NEVER seen 'low to mid twenties' Towing my AS 25' I get 11 ,maybe, and sans trailer 16.5 to 18.4 is normal. Love the truck, just sayin. . . Regards, Craig


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