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kry226 03-21-2013 03:26 AM

Airstream Factory to Dealer Delivery
 
I've seen this questioned from time to time regarding how the new trailers are delivered to the dealers. I think most of these threads result in on-road delivery instead of delivery by trailer. I just wanted to confirm this for those folks who still wonder. I was at a dealer recently when I witnessed the arrival of a new unit via Ohio licensed pick-up.

http://www.airforums.com/attachments...12f7a3a31b.jpg

Inland RV Center, In 03-21-2013 06:23 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kry226 (Post 1275700)
I've seen this questioned from time to time regarding how the new trailers are delivered to the dealers. I think most of these threads result in on-road delivery instead of delivery by trailer. I just wanted to confirm this for those folks who still wonder. I was at a dealer recently when I witnessed the arrival of a new unit via Ohio licensed pick-up.

http://www.airforums.com/attachments...12f7a3a31b.jpg

That's how they always have been delivered, that I know of since at least 1966.

Andy

tuffr2 03-21-2013 06:25 AM

You are correct. I was at the factory last week and saw two dually trucks with trailers and class B lined up. The factory tour host pointed out that most trailers are towed and class B's are driven to the dealer. I made a point to look at the hitch set-up on the dually trucks. There was no WD or any anti-sway devices being used. They were just hooked to the truck ball.

Also factory tour host said they build 34 units a week. Looking to up that to 40 per week.

RickDavis 03-21-2013 06:54 AM

Most trailers are towed to dealers. I did this for 10 years although not for Airstream. Typical trucks are 3/4 ton or 1 ton . Most of us do use weight distributing hitches , however sway control is an aftermarket device so it is not used.
While the lack of sway control can sound scary actually it is not a problem and accidents for any reason are rare. Most often when they happen it is poor judgement on the drivers part in not getting off the road in bad weather..

Inland RV Center, In 03-21-2013 07:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RickDavis (Post 1275750)
Most trailers are towed to dealers. I did this for 10 years although not for Airstream. Typical trucks are 3/4 ton or 1 ton . Most of us do use weight distributing hitches , however sway control is an aftermarket device so it is not used.
While the lack of sway control can sound scary actually it is not a problem and accidents for any reason are rare. Most often when they happen it is poor judgement on the drivers part in not getting off the road in bad weather..

Rick.

Caravanner Insurance and I, was able to prove the cause of 85 percent of loss of control accidents involving the Airstream and Argosy trailers.

Of that 85 percent, one of the major categories was "no sway control", which shared the most often list with rear end suspension modifications.

What one person may do here and there, has little effect on what happens in the entire country.

Andy

Jim Clark 03-21-2013 08:42 AM

Do the delivery drives check the tire pressure and the lug nut torque as outlined in the owners manual?

On my Safari it arrived with a broken mount for the Zip Dee awning, when I called Zip Dee they wanted to blame the deliver driver when it was clearly a bad casting. I was surprised it even came up. Zip Dee did send the mount and all went well. I bet the drivers get blamed for a lot of thing that is not their fault.

Jim Clark 03-21-2013 08:45 AM

Andy, please expand on the rear end suspension modifications that caused the most accidents.

Fly at Night 03-21-2013 09:12 AM

My trailer already had 3,900 km on it when I purchased it? It's a long way from JC to the Fraser Valley!

I always assumed it came via flatbed. Last time I took the ferry to Vancouver Island, a flatbed loaded with T@b trailers was in the line-up. They are small trailers, though.

I'm curious - will ask the dealer next time I'm there.

damonbeals 03-21-2013 09:23 AM

Living in Indiana, we see lots of new trailers on the interstate going to dealers. I can tell you that none of the delivery companies use WD or Sway Control, they just use a big truck with dualies. The only time I have seen Airstreams on a trailer was a pair of Bambi’s going west.

Damon
#4827

graysailor 03-21-2013 09:37 AM

Trailer damage
 
Having hauled cars for many years I can assure you that any damage on a trailer is blamed on the delivery driver.

Skater 03-21-2013 09:46 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Inland RV Center, In (Post 1275786)
Rick.

Caravanner Insurance and I, was able to prove the cause of 85 percent of loss of control accidents involving the Airstream and Argosy trailers.

Of that 85 percent, one of the major categories was "no sway control", which shared the most often list with rear end suspension modifications.

What one person may do here and there, has little effect on what happens in the entire country.

Andy

I don't doubt your statistics, but at the same time I'm sure driver experience factors in heavily - someone who spends all day, every day, towing trailers probably knows far better what to do and what not to do than the average trailer owner that goes out a couple weekends a year.

I saw a website the other day complaining about U-Haul after they rolled their pickup and U-Haul trailer. From what he described, it's pretty clearly a loss of control due to sway accident. I wouldn't be surprised to find that he had it loaded poorly and hadn't towed often (if any) before, so when the sway started he did the wrong thing. Someone with more experience towing would be more likely to do the right thing and avoid the accident.

Colonial Airstream 03-21-2013 10:06 AM

They also come this way if they are 23' and down.

Airstream Trailer Camper RV Transport Delivery To From Dealership You Ship Uship haul - YouTube

RickDavis 03-21-2013 10:59 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Jim Clark (Post 1275800)
Do the delivery drives check the tire pressure and the lug nut torque as outlined in the owners manual?

On my Safari it arrived with a broken mount for the Zip Dee awning, when I called Zip Dee they wanted to blame the deliver driver when it was clearly a bad casting. I was surprised it even came up. Zip Dee did send the mount and all went well. I bet the drivers get blamed for a lot of thing that is not their fault.

The policy of companies is to check the trailer thoroughly. Including tire pressure and any damage. What the delivery driver does of course can be a different story. Some are very thorough, others are not, and the sloppy ones do not seem to stick around very long.

I personally always checked lug bolts, tire pressure brakes, Put tie wraps around the awning arms etc and if there was anything questionable about the unit I would photograph it with something in the background that would back up the location as well as the time/date stamp.
I always used WD even on small units and I think most our drivers did also. Even though the truck might carry the weight it gets rid of a lot of "pitching"

Andy's numbers on sway caused accidents are interesting. I suspect that most of these are caused by over reaction when the trailer wiggles coupled with excessive speed. I got passed a lot by other trailer haulers.

Like anything, there are both the good and the bad out there.

kry226 03-22-2013 03:22 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by NeatAirstream (Post 1275838)

Any savings that can be had, should. Two deliveries for the price of one, or just slightly more, is simply good business.

kry226 03-22-2013 03:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tuffr2 (Post 1275740)
You are correct. I was at the factory last week and saw two dually trucks with trailers and class B lined up. The factory tour host pointed out that most trailers are towed and class B's are driven to the dealer. I made a point to look at the hitch set-up on the dually trucks. There was no WD or any anti-sway devices being used. They were just hooked to the truck ball.

Also factory tour host said they build 34 units a week. Looking to up that to 40 per week.

I didn't look at the hitch set-up. I will from now on, simply for situational awareness.

But during our factory tour at Alumapalooza 2011, the weekly production was running at 26. Business must be good.


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