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Old 02-16-2015, 12:12 PM   #1
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1960 24' Tradewind
Biltmore Lake , North Carolina
Join Date: Feb 2015
Posts: 14
'60 Tradewind Project-Help Appeciated

So excited-We get our 1960 24 foot Tradewind delivered this weekend and would appreciate any restoration advice. New to all of this!

The exterior is in good condition but the interior has to go. My husband plans to take it down to bare walls to make sure it doesn't leak and start from there. Yes, we will need new cabinets/etc. We are just beginning to plan the project.

Thanks in advance for your advice.

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Old 02-16-2015, 08:00 PM   #2
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Bartlett , Illinois
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Nice looking trailer, congrats. I am in the same boat, redoing a 51 Silver Streak. My best advise is to just keep reading the forum. You will change your mind several times before you settle on a plan. Have fun with your restoration!
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Old 02-17-2015, 06:23 AM   #3
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1986 34' Limited
1966 24' Tradewind
Conifer , Colorado
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Oh what fun! It appears someone has restored the exterior. I imagine the axles, frame and subfloor are all in good shape. An interior remodel must be done on a solid foundation.

Then you have to determine how you plan on using the trailer. Some folks use them as a food vendor, some folks want a comfortable traveler, and some folks want a restored "as new" show trailer.

Then start planning the major appliances. Locate the fridge, furnace, water heater, cooktop, toilet, sinks, etc. You will find major design constraints here as a fridge need propane and an vent, a toilet needs a holding tank, a furnace needs an exterior wall for venting, same with the water heater, and you need a fresh water tank. Even a flat panel TV takes some careful thought.

Then decide on sleeping arrangements. Some like a big bed, some like twin beds, some like bunk beds. Beds take a lot of room.

And the big argument is dinette or couch. A family with little ones like the dinette that makes into a bed. Two adults may prefer comfortable seating instead.

It will take many design iterations to develop what you want. I have marveled at the nifty floor plans Airstream designers have released over the years. They are very good at small space interior designs. Take a tour of the new Airstreams to get ideas for your old one.

My 66 Trade Wind wouldn't have a shower stall, I need the storage space instead. I like the twin beds. I need more storage space in the galley. And we prefer comfortable and adjustable seating as opposed to a couch or a dinette.

We sleep and sit in our trailers when we travel. Otherwise we're enjoying the great outdoors. So what you do on a rainy evening in the trailer is what you should design for.

Have fun,

David
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Old 02-17-2015, 07:40 AM   #4
KCN
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1962 26' Overlander
Jackson , Wyoming
Join Date: Jun 2012
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Tearing out is really fun and interesting, but proceed cautiously and slowly with the removal of the existing cabinets, even if you plan to replace all of them with something new. They are a great teacher.

Observe the riveted, curved aluminum pieces that attach the cabinets to the walls, take them down carefully and identify each one of those pieces, because there will be variations from one end, and one side, of the trailer to the other. Take pictures of the disassembly, because later it may help you with making templates for those parts you may wish to replicate - bulkhead walls, for example.

Look for and save little things like hooks and latches and screen hardware and things that can be hard to find later when you might wish you had them for reference or re-use. There are a lot of tiny parts. They are expensive and add up when you replace them x many. I used zip-loc's labeled with each window, door, etc... easier than going through a coffee can full of stuff later.

Look for the Lifetime Warranty paper - mine was glued to the inside of the mirrored door. Fun little piece of history to have, if it's there.

Take videos of the disassembly, or at least many pictures. Can't emphasize that enough.

Congrats. Great trailer, great year!

KCN
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Old 02-17-2015, 02:30 PM   #5
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1961 24' Tradewind
1967 26' Overlander
1973 27' Overlander
Savannah , Georgia
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 152
I echo David's advice, and will add one other factor. Tanks. When you decide how you want to use the trailer, some of that use will be dictated by tanks (or lack thereof). I have a 61 Tradewind that I kept original. Like mine, yours no doubt has only a small blackwater tank under the toilet. It also uses an antiquated dump control valve unless someone changed it out. In other words, modern hoses will not fit it unless you have the original adapter. If you are going to use this at any place other than a full hook up site, you will want to add at least a gray water tank. And there will begin a task. There are lots of threads on adding tanks. You need to really think this part through as it will have an effect on plumbing placement.

Also, when you gut the trailer, remove the cabinets carefully and maybe put them up for sale. All the doors, the hardware, etc. is in demand (especially for people like me!). For those of us keeping things original, we just cannot find these things. And keep us informed!

Michael
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Old 02-17-2015, 02:42 PM   #6
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1960 26' Overlander
1963 24' Tradewind
El Paso , Texas
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Your cabinets look awesome! Wish mine were half that nice. If you gut it you should consider offering the interior items here on the classifieds. I know I'd be interested.
Mike
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Old 02-17-2015, 04:36 PM   #7
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1972 27' Overlander
Penokee , Kansas
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Its better for that nice of a trailer to sit a year as is,, then to tare into it and make a mess of it.. Like everyone said,, read, read and study 1000s of photos for ideas..
My advice is to camp in it as is this year to gain a better idea what you have now or need later.. Once its all in a pile in the driveway is the wrong time to change your ideas... Sodbust
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Old 02-18-2015, 02:47 AM   #8
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If it were mine I would strip and refinish those original all real wood cabinets. It is a beauty
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:54 AM   #9
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1960 24' Tradewind
Biltmore Lake , North Carolina
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There's so much to learn! Best of luck on your project.
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Old 02-18-2015, 11:56 AM   #10
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1960 24' Tradewind
Biltmore Lake , North Carolina
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Does anyone have a cost breakdown on a redo they would share? I'm working on mine and I'm wondering if it's correct. I never dreamed there would be so much to learn!
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Old 02-18-2015, 12:58 PM   #11
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Richmond , Virginia
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Depends on what you do and how much you do. Also, how many tools and materials you have on hand. You can go to Vintage Trailer Supply and just start adding things to a cart on every page. That'll cover most of it, except the Axle, Rims and Tires. Your rims and tires look new, but I'd double check the axles. That's about $500 per I think, but you only have one.
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Old 02-18-2015, 03:50 PM   #12
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1961 24' Tradewind
1967 26' Overlander
1973 27' Overlander
Savannah , Georgia
Join Date: Aug 2013
Posts: 152
When it comes to project costs, I try to hold my finger over the "total" section with the cart at Vintage Trailer Supply. Project costs vary greatly - just like in home building. You can build a spartan cottage or a castle. It also depends on how much you can do yourself. Can you build cabinetry? Do the wiring? Plumbing? Or will you have to contract some or all of that out? Also, the axle is a great point. With a 1960, you may have either a leaf spring or a torsion axle. 1961 was the first all torsion year. When I had the axle replaced on mine, thankfully I had a very patient, very innovative person do the work who was not afraid of a 50+ year old trailer. I knew better than to tackle this one as I cannot weld or fabricate heavy metal. The axle alone, with shipping, will be about $750 - install labor is additional. Two suggestions. First, scour threads here. You will garner a huge amount of information, insight and get an idea for costs. Second, when you think you know what you want to do, sit back in a chair and stare at the trailer for a few weeks before you dive in. Second thoughts are a bad thing when it comes to renovations!
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Old 02-18-2015, 05:03 PM   #13
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1971 25' Tradewind
Menlo Park , California
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Do the minimum you have to in order to be able to camp. Only experience will tell you what features you may want to keep and what has to go.

Replacing the wood is a lot of work. We didn't change the layout. Even with just pulling out the fake wood walls, using them as patterns and replacing them with real plywood took months and months of every free weekend and some evenings after work. The dinettes we build from scratch to suit our needs better than the original gaucho couches took even longer. I had access to power wood tools but had to use the trailer itself as my varnishing space. I love the results, but I'm glad that phase is well behind us.

We camped in it throughout the whole process. Our plans changed because of how we found we used the trailer.
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Old 02-18-2015, 07:56 PM   #14
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1986 34' Limited
1966 24' Tradewind
Conifer , Colorado
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Well, I'm keeping all my receipts, including trips to the hardware store. Renovating an old camper, Airstream or not, is not cheap. The costs are spread out over time. So:

Axles $700 each delivered.
Furnace $700
Water Heater $350
2 Holding Tanks $700
Fresh Water Tank $350
Floor covering $450
Aluminum sheeting $300
Converter, fuse panel, new breaker box $300
See Level monitor for tanks $230

Overall I have about $8500 spent in parts and supplies so far. And I have a fridge and cook top yet to buy, cost budget another $1300.

I may recover a goodly portion of the parts cost, but not likely the labor costs. Professionally restored Airstreams are worth a lot more.

David
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