Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-20-2003, 08:56 AM   #43
Moderator Emeritus
 
overlander64's Avatar
 
1964 26' Overlander
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
Anna , Illinois
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,396
Images: 183
Send a message via Yahoo to overlander64
Regional Food Specialties

After re-reading all of the posts, I realized that one of my favorite Bar-B-Ques was actually something of a regional treat. In Southern Illinois, there are two establishments that feature a very unique and tasty Bar-B-Que - - Shemwell's (Alexander County - - in Cairo) and Dixie Bar-B-Que (Union County - - in Jonesboro). In both cases, the Bar-B-Que is Pork shoulder that has been hickory smoked, sliced paper thin and served with a home-made Bar-B-Que sauce. The sauces are similar yet slightly different - - Shemwell's tends to be a bit "hotter" while Dixie's tends to be a little "sweeter". The hot vs. sweet seems to be a function of the amount of horse raddish used in the sauce - - or at least that has been the speculation in my family.

Kevin
__________________

__________________
Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI (Lifetime Member)/VAC/Free Wheelers #6359
AIR #827
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban (7400 VORTEC/4.11 Differentials)
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre/1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible (8.2 Liter V8/2.70 Final Drive)
overlander64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 09:01 AM   #44
Rivet Master
 
norbert's Avatar
 
1993 30' Excella
chicagoland , north of cheddar curtain
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,258
Images: 24
maxandgeorgia,
i was in the navy with a guy from bayou la batre....cant say i had any gumbo there...but i got the cooks tour from a native son...quite an interesting little town...thats where shrimpin started i believe......
norby
__________________

__________________
Illegitimous noncarborundum(dont let the bastards wear you down)

The only true nobility is found through giving good food to your friends- Anton Careme

beauty is in the eye of the beerholder-cosmo fishhawk

if something is too good to be true, its usually gone before i get there-mister boffo
norbert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 09:04 AM   #45
Moderator Emeritus
 
overlander64's Avatar
 
1964 26' Overlander
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
Anna , Illinois
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,396
Images: 183
Send a message via Yahoo to overlander64
Regional Food Specialties

Greetings nds!

Quote:
But, what are they?
Loose Meat sandwiches, Maid Rites, or Steamburgers all have a common presentation. It is basically a sandwich of "crumbled hamburger". Unlike sloppy joes, these sandwiches do not have a tomato sauce binder; in fact there is no sauce involved. The meat is "steamed" until done and crumbled - - the steaming element varies - - some use chicken broth - - others use beef broth - - others use plain water. To the "steaming" base, the cook usually adds a compliment of seasonings and spices. Most cooks also add onions and some add a taste of galic. The bun is usually toasted and served with a heaping portion of the loose meat with the normal compliment of hamburger compliments - - catsup, mustard, mayonaise, etc. I like to add a couple of slices of crisp bacon to mine as well as some sharp cheddar cheese.

Kevin
__________________
Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI (Lifetime Member)/VAC/Free Wheelers #6359
AIR #827
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban (7400 VORTEC/4.11 Differentials)
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre/1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible (8.2 Liter V8/2.70 Final Drive)
overlander64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 09:07 AM   #46
Retired Moderator
 
john hd's Avatar
 
1992 29' Excella
madison , Wisconsin
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,644
Images: 40
Re: Re: Maid-rites-loose meat sandwiches

Quote:
Originally posted by nds

But, what are they?
can't really say for sure...

BUT, i did see a show on our local pbs station that explained what they are.

the show is called "sandwiches that you will like" made by WQED.

it is available for sale. -or- you can check your local pbs station to see if they are airing it.

it covered maidrite, loosemeat, grinders, poboys, horseshoes etc.

here is a link for it....

http://www.wqed.org/tv/natl/sandwiches/

john
__________________
you call them ferrets, i call them weasels.
john hd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 09:44 AM   #47
Retired Moderator
 
john hd's Avatar
 
1992 29' Excella
madison , Wisconsin
Join Date: Aug 2002
Posts: 4,644
Images: 40
here is the maidrite page from the above link....


http://www.maidrite.com/

has a pretty good description of what "loosemeat" is.

john
__________________
you call them ferrets, i call them weasels.
john hd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 09:59 AM   #48
The Painted Pig
 
Moonshot's Avatar
 
1979 Argosy Minuet 7.3 Metre
Hailey , Idaho
Join Date: Jul 2002
Posts: 337
Images: 14
Fish Camps

In North Carolina there are "fish camps" or "fish houses" where you can get some excellent freshwater fish or seafood.

Our favorite is Harward's in New London, NC. Off the beaten path for sure but good eatin'. Another good one from years ago was Cap'n Wendy's near Gastonia. At least to a young boy Cap'n Wendy seemed like an honest to gosh pirate, what with a wooden leg and all!

What sets a fish camp apart from other restaurants is that seating is usually done indoors on wooden picnic tables and instead of napkins you get a roll of paper towels!

Scott
__________________
Moonshot is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 10:08 AM   #49
Rivet Master
 
norbert's Avatar
 
1993 30' Excella
chicagoland , north of cheddar curtain
Join Date: Jun 2003
Posts: 1,258
Images: 24
Talking LOL...LOL...LOL...LOL...

All these years...and i finally know what a fish camp is! When i would work down south as a young lad...i used to think man there sure are a lot of sportsmen down here.....
you made my day...
norby
__________________
Illegitimous noncarborundum(dont let the bastards wear you down)

The only true nobility is found through giving good food to your friends- Anton Careme

beauty is in the eye of the beerholder-cosmo fishhawk

if something is too good to be true, its usually gone before i get there-mister boffo
norbert is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 08:33 PM   #50
Site Team
 
, Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,940
Images: 59
Norbert:
Just til the new year, could you drop the Lutefisk comment. . . .
This is the season to be generous; and non-judgmental.
Don, in Minnesota.
__________________
markdoane is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 08:56 PM   #51
Rivet Master
 
Davydd's Avatar
 
Tonka Bay
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 767
Images: 13
Lutefisk

Don,

I've been in Minnesota 33 years and have yet to try Lutefisk (sober). In fact I haven't met anyone yet claiming they like it.

I joined the Sons of Norway (not a drop of Norwegian blood in me) one year mainly because their headquarters was across the street from my office and had a bar that served 50 cent beer to members. They should just about now be having their annual Christmas dinner where everything served is WHITE! Potatoes, hominy, cauliflower, lefse, lutefisk, etc. I'm sure I must have ate normal broiled cod that night.
__________________
Davydd
2015 Sprinter Class B Camper Van
(Former 1971 vintage Airstream Owner)
Davydd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 09:32 PM   #52
Rivet Master
 
Davydd's Avatar
 
Tonka Bay
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 767
Images: 13
Pasties and other assorted regional food

We always make a pastie stop first thing after crossing the Mackinaw Bridge on the way back to Minnesota. Then we stop a couple of miles down the way and have a short picnic on the white sand shores of Lake Michigan.

Is Pittsburgh the only place where they garnish their hamburgers with french fries? The best cookies ever were the ones we bought from an Amish street vendor on the Strip in Pittsburgh.

Chili in Cincinnati? Must be a new thing. Never heard of that claim back in the 60s when I went to college there.

I adhered to vegetarianism for 7 years until our sons wedding in Massachusetts. Then I succumbed to fresh lobster all along the coast of New England from Gloucester to Bar Harbor. Forgot what fresh lobster was truly like since our days in Newport, RI. It ain't the same anywhere else inland even if it is alive in those mossy restaurant and supermarket tanks.

White Castles? Com'n those gut bombs, sliders or whatever else you want to call them are all over the midwest--Minneapolis, Indianapolis, Cincinnati, Cleveland and elsewhere east to New Jersey. When I grew up, eating out with the family was going to White Castle and buying them by the sack for 10 cents each or a dozen for a dollar. In college they were 3 AM sober pills.

I'm curious about another food idiosycracy. I spent a lot of time in Philadelphia back in 1971 working on a design/build project--31 nights to be exact. Every restaurant had a soup of the day and always "Snapper" soup as the other choice. As I remember snapper soup was not the red snapper fish but snapping turtle and all the turtles were imported. When I ask now I get a, "Huh?" Did it die away with the turtle supply?

Peoples' fear of family members dying in Minnesota is really a fear of "hotdish" from supportive neighbors. That is casserole to others. It is probably as reviled as fruitcake. But then I was never turned off by fruitcake as long as it was marinated liberally with rum.

When traveling to the North Shore of Lake Superior in Minnesota a must stop is always Betty's Pies. The restaurant is new, bigger, relocated and under new management but the tradition still holds and the pie variety is huge.

A lot of foods have a mystic. Coors beer was the smuggle in beer of choice in Indiana. White Castles do get shipped frozen all over. Krispy Kreme was the donut of the stars and unavailable a short two years ago in Minneapolis. Now we are inundated with them and they are being sold in Target Stores and Holiday gas and convenient stores everywhere. Now they are not so hot. Woullet's Bakery is the place to go for a donut. Rest in peace Lincoln Del and Bernie's delicatessen where donuts were absolutely fabulous. That was before the muffins and scones crowd muscled them out. Thank god Krispy Kreme brought the donut back.
__________________
Davydd
2015 Sprinter Class B Camper Van
(Former 1971 vintage Airstream Owner)
Davydd is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 09:51 PM   #53
2 Rivet Member
 
donnall's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Posts: 96
Hot Springs Ark, wet BBQ ribs at McLards

Hoxie Ark, Fried cat fish, home made sweet rolls, & ice cream at Fiddlers.

Jonesboro, Ark, BBQ salad at Couch's BBQ

Lake View Ark, sunday buffet at Gastons resort on the White River.

Bald Knob Ark, real cajun food at Who-Dats

Just a few of my favorie local (to me) places in Arkansas.

Don
__________________
Don Nall
93 Land Yacht (The Minnow)
donnall is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 10:03 PM   #54
Rivet Master<br><img src="/ugala/forums/images/5rivet.gif">
 
CanoeStream's Avatar

 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
St. Cloud , Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 13,279
Images: 19
Blog Entries: 3
Aw'right, Awright....

Even 'Minnesota Nice' fails us on the topic of lutefisk. Cultures of Italy and Portugal enjoy their baccala. Usually blended with tomato and other flavors, baccala tends to be a slivered form of what we relish (mmm-m-m-m!) as lutefisk. It begins with a humble dried codfish. The necessary reconstitution may be a tad smelly for the workers involved in putting it into cold cases in our groceries. The result is only one part of a dinner plate and quite comparable to what other areas of the country enjoy in a good fish chowder.

The question at our annual Lutheran church's lutefisk dinner is, "Swedish or Norwegian?" After laying the blue glassy filets on a mound of potatoes, you are offered cream gravy or butter over the top to satisfy the nationality question. This is what took our elders through the winter and into the bumper harvest of tofu and craisins in the summer (mixing our metaphors, aren't we?).

I can refer you to www.olsenfish.com for a wealth of information on this misunderstood protein source. (Though I confess I once duped a young niece into happily eating a piece of "Christmas Fish" -- no complaints there!) For the best results one had better hope for a good family source to experience lutefisk. I do not think many restaurants would do it justice. Minnesotans pride themselves about their roots -- I only married into it (My multi-great-grandfather and source of my given name lies interred in the State Cemetery on the capital grounds in Austin, Texas). Yet our Philadelphia members could tell you the earliest Scandinavian settlements in the country forced William Penn to relocate upriver before he founded the home of the Liberty Bell, great soft-shell crab dinners, and the USS Olympia.

Humble farmer roots lie behind the reputation for white-colored food -- rice pudding, potato dumplings (called either krop kakor or potato klub), and lutefisk of course. Top it off with a bit of lingonberry and your savory Yule dinner would be welcomed by anyone. Scandinavia roamed the seas with as much reach as the Dutch East India Company. Spices from the world figured into cosmopolitan cuisines in Stockholm and Oslo. Witness the rise of Marcus Samuelsson and Andreas Viestad -- though I don't think I will be emulating them anytime soon in a campground.

The response to this topic is great indeed -- keep it coming and I will post an index document of specialties by state! But I guess I will have to privately relish my own serving of lutefisk on Thursday.... Sköl!!
__________________
Bob

5 meter Langford Nahanni

CanoeStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 10:22 PM   #55
Rivet Master<br><img src="/ugala/forums/images/5rivet.gif">
 
CanoeStream's Avatar

 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
St. Cloud , Minnesota
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 13,279
Images: 19
Blog Entries: 3
Davydd -- Hominy? Minnesotan? (Though the treatment with lye as a preservative is quite similar to lutefisk, hominy is revered by itself, as grits, or as pozole in Mexico)

On the white-food subject Cream of Wheat's home always was in Nord'east Minneapolis I guess.

Judy's Cafe in Two Harbors has had krop kakor one night a week in my experience...
__________________
Bob

5 meter Langford Nahanni

CanoeStream is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-20-2003, 10:44 PM   #56
Rivet Master
 
Davydd's Avatar
 
Tonka Bay
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 767
Images: 13
Hominy?

Okay, okay, it must have been a southern lapse on my part. After 33 years I still don't understand why you can't get grits for breakfast anywhere in Minnesota. It's hell trying to find black eyed peas for New Years day in Minnesota as well.

This week I interviewed a lady from Texas for an admin job. She remarked to me that she could understand me because I talked slow compared to everyone else. Yes! yes! I still have it after 33 years! But, I'm not perfect. When I go to my high school reunions my "Fargo" accent is commented on.
__________________

__________________
Davydd
2015 Sprinter Class B Camper Van
(Former 1971 vintage Airstream Owner)
Davydd is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:38 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.