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Old 02-26-2015, 09:14 AM   #29
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Pagey-we sound like kindred spirits! Another trick I use is cooking pasta before we leave for a trip, put some olive oil on it and store in ziplock bags once it cools. Less cooking time and moisture in the trailer. This is our first year with an airstream and we love it. We rarely go out to eat when we are not on the road so the transition for me is easy. Great idea about whole foods and trader joes and mapping them out!
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Old 02-26-2015, 12:50 PM   #30
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This pre-mapping of good major chain stores sounds like a good idea-- although we avoid cities if we possibly can. We live in a remote town and tend to stay in the boondocks, so the following can be make from easy-to-find-locally ingredients plus a little pre-trip shopping at an urban specialty store. (We load up in Vancouver!)

We focus on "real" food vs. look-alike meat substitutes. I enjoy cooking (glamping-- hey, we're in an Airstream,) but not in lieu of time spent in the great outdoors.

Near Eastern foods like hummus or ful, baba ghanoush, pita, a chopped salad of tomato, pepper, and cucumber; and tabouli (w/ quinoa or millet for the gluten-free folks) can be easily made. And often purchased. Ovo-lactos can add feta cheese.

For grilling, it is hard to beat smoky grilled eggplant, green beans, sweet potato slices, or asparagus; and grilling is a nice thing to do to marinated extra-firm tofu.

Canned artichoke hearts and kalamata olives, can round out a Near Eastern or pasta meal.

Japanese food is another winner. Skip the fish, and use tofu, short-grain rice or noodles, seaweed salad or sushi wrappers, miso, just a few special ingredients like their cooking wine (mirin, pre-purchased,) and a few vegetables. Many of these foods are served at room temperature so there's no struggle to get hot foods ready at the same time. Pass the green tea or sake!

Lettuce wraps with many types of ethnic inspirations are another option.

Indian vegetable curries over rice are also easy to make with a pre-mixed curry powder.

Basic staples for the above would include canned chick peas and fava beans (dried if you have the time,) fresh garlic, scallions, flat-leaf fresh parsley, a pre-mixed Near Eastern spice mixture, soy sauce, lemons, wasabi horse radish (can be purchased in a dry powder form,) sesame seeds, tahini paste (can substitute almond butter,) and instant dashi (seaweed bouillon-- but it is hard to find without MSG.)

Costco is a great source of raw nuts, and increasingly of organic foods.
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Old 03-08-2015, 10:58 AM   #31
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It's nice to see that the DW and I are in good company with other vegan and plant-based devotees out there. The stereotypical camper is often painted as being a real carnivore, living off steaks, chili and bacon, but as I said in my earlier post, camping actually encourages us to use the local fresh produce that's available at small stores and roadside stalls all over North America.

I'm looking forward to hitting the road again this year and getting some good, local and seasonal produce into our meals.
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Old 03-08-2015, 11:22 PM   #32
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We are currently driving south through Nevada on HY 95 on our way to Death Valley. This is our second such trip and I have not yet found a good supermarket in Nevada, let alone a roadside stand, unfortunately. We avoid big cities if humanly possible, and no doubt an upscale suburban Las Vegas neighbourhood would do much better. This morning we found a supermarket in Winnemucca that had no (zero) small containers of plain unsweetened yogurt and hardly any organics. But it had about two aisles of liquor-- mostly in the jumbo-sized bottles. The produce section was interesting, though: Mexican specialties that we wouldn't see in British Columbia.

Fortunately we loaded up at the Yokes supermarket in Ponderay, Idaho (big natural foods section); plus I made a lot of hummous & a kidney bean-walnut spread before we got here.
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Old 03-10-2015, 09:20 PM   #33
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Glad I found this thread! I thought we were alone eating vegan (me) and almost vegetarian (DW) in the RV world. SO helpful to read meal suggestions. Maybe an "eat healthy" forum rally could work....of course, we'd let the carnivores in too!


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Old 03-11-2015, 12:33 AM   #34
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As an omnivore and people who want to eat local and fresh where possible, we also want to note that the rallies we attend usually have a potluck meet-up and there are ALWAYS various dishes. Of course, there are meat=based items, but they are fresh-made and tasty (for us). the large number of salads, "side dishes" and veg items is always fulfilling and generally fresh tasting. We are focused on quality, and since we are both former vegetarians we still have a focus in this area, and the potlucks always meet the expectation.
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Old 03-11-2015, 06:36 AM   #35
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Depending on the area of the country we are in, dictates how we eat that day. Right now we're in Cajun Country and for sure we're going to try and eat the local specialties. I use yelp a lot and also ask around where the best local places are to eat. Yesterday was a great example of that. Locals told us about Don's Meat Market for the best "boudin." We found Don's, bought a couple of hot links and was told the only place to sit was around the side of the building at a "table." We found out this is where the help takes their breaks, so enjoyed the boudin with the chef and his helper and got a great lesson on the making of boudin and other Cajun specialties. That was so good, went back in for one serving of the plate special of the day, pork and sausage over rice and gravy, lima beans with ham, and canned pears. The canned pears kind of threw me, but who am I to judge. The whole experience was great. If we're in uninteresting food country, it's two meals a day in the AS and try to eat as healthy as possible.
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Old 03-11-2015, 07:14 AM   #36
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Originally Posted by hickory View Post
I was having a discussion with a friend about traveling.
He says that pulling a travel trailer is a very poor way to travel. They like to travel by car stay in motels and eat out all the time. Much cheaper and more relaxing according to him. No making the bed or cooking or washing dishes.

Do you think you eat healthier when traveling in your trailer?
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Your friend must not be very good at math or managing his/her money if he believes that utter nonsense.

Room prices exceed camp ground fee's by an order of magnitude: Average daily hotel room rate in the U.S. 2015 | Statistic
http://skift.com/2014/09/02/average-...-half-of-2014/

Over $120 on average per night in the US. Please tell me more about expensive camp ground fees.

And sorry, shopping for groceries is cheaper than eating every meal out.

Sadly your friend is a prime example of why most people never go on vacation. They lament they can't afford it, because that's how they travel. Like they're a sultan or something. Utter stupidity IMO.

If you don't eat out 3 meals a day at home, why do you suddenly do it when traveling?
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Old 04-16-2015, 07:35 AM   #37
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Interesting article.

Not a vegetarian, but leaning much more that direction with my widow's diet , I have experienced a number of health-improvement by-products from consuming much less meat, almost no beef, and many fewer carbs in my diet.....simply because that is what I prefer.....and because I am the only one I am preparing meals for these days.


Meaty Truth: How Chronic Diseases May Be Fueled by an Animal-Based Diet - Health and Wellness - Mother Earth Living


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Old 04-16-2015, 07:44 AM   #38
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Traveling by RV can be cheaper than by car, if you do not figure in the initial cost of the RV. In my case I always have a trailer so we save bunches by using it to travel. Peace,jim
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Old 04-17-2015, 06:17 AM   #39
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Interesting article.

Not a vegetarian, but leaning much more that direction with my widow's diet , I have experienced a number of health-improvement by-products from consuming much less meat, almost no beef, and many fewer carbs in my diet.....simply because that is what I prefer.....and because I am the only one I am preparing meals for these days.


Meaty Truth: How Chronic Diseases May Be Fueled by an Animal-Based Diet - Health and Wellness - Mother Earth Living


Maggie
Since dumping meat (for various reasons), I've lost 30 pounds in weight and feel so much better; no more indigestion or acid reflux for me. I've also dropped dairy products and whilst I might have enjoyed a bit of cheese in the past or added cream to my coffee, now I really don't miss any of that stuff.

I do occasionally have a bit of fish, which is my treat to myself and why I don't use the label "Vegetarian" or 'Vegan", but I've been mostly plant-based for 18 months and really enjoying the change.
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Old 04-17-2015, 06:26 AM   #40
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I don't think I could do meatless altogether, and feel no need, really, but the health benefits of less meat in our diets seem pretty clear.

Less meat, whole grains, less processed food = improved health, in many ways.



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Old 04-17-2015, 06:41 AM   #41
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Since dumping meat (for various reasons), I've lost 30 pounds in weight and feel so much better; no more indigestion or acid reflux for me. I've also dropped dairy products and whilst I might have enjoyed a bit of cheese in the past or added cream to my coffee, now I really don't miss any of that stuff.

I do occasionally have a bit of fish, which is my treat to myself and why I don't use the label "Vegetarian" or 'Vegan", but I've been mostly plant-based for 18 months and really enjoying the change.


X2 - about three years in...hard to describe all the positive impact
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Old 04-17-2015, 07:20 AM   #42
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I have been generally aware as I get older that I have been eating a lot less meat - in fact several times I had said to my wife that I could quite easily become a vegetarian. Never met a vegetable I didn't like!

However at my last medical checkup last fall, I was diagnosed with mild anemia due to iron deficiency and put on prescription iron supplements. Internal exams from the ends didn't reveal any serious issue and so diet was the most likely suspect!


As well as the iron supplements which are hopefully a short term remedy, I have since made a conscientious effort to re-introduce a little more meat into my diet - I had forgotten how great a well cooked steak now and then can taste!

Blood iron is back to normal now, and I feel pretty good - moderation in all things as they say!

Since I tend to eat smaller meals than I used to, when I do have steak, either at home or in a restaurant, I now order the better cuts - quality over quantity - and that works out fine!

As for eating when on the road with the AS, if it were just up to me, I would never eat in a restaurant, but my good lady wife had different views, so we eat out at least a couple of times a week so she is happy!

Often, if we are out touring someplace during the day, we will have our main meal for lunch at a restaurant, (saves me a little money, being a cheap SOB, as lunch prices are lower!) then just a snack in the trailer in the evening.

Brian.
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