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Old 02-24-2009, 08:43 AM   #113
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Post Bread

Hi Doug and Maggie,

I've been making a no kneed bread in my dutch oven for over a year now and make a loaf at least once a week.

I do use an oven. I would be interested to see how your experiment works.

Good luck,

Michael

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Originally Posted by doug&maggie View Post
We don't have an oven in our Interstate, so carry a Dutch oven to have freshly baked goods on occasion. We found an heavy old sponge/angel food cake pan at an antique store, which fits perfectly inside, allows us to reuse, and the hole in the center helps breads bake more thoroughly. We have filled refrigerated breads with meat/cheese/seasonings, refrigerated croissant dough with cinnamon sugar and nuts and baked quick bread recipes---all with good success and very little cleanup. When we do cobblers or other messy goodies, we use disposable foil pans. I am getting ready to try a yeast bread next.
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Old 02-24-2009, 09:27 AM   #114
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Bread

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Originally Posted by ArtStream View Post
Hi Doug and Maggie,

I've been making a no kneed bread in my dutch oven for over a year now and make a loaf at least once a week.

I do use an oven. I would be interested to see how your experiment works.

Good luck,

Michael
I also make no knead bread. I use a 5 qt regular Dutch oven (not the camp style) and bake it in my kitchen. I use sourdough starter and no yeast. It has to rise for 24 hours. It bakes with a really crispy artisan style crust, a good dense crumb and a nice sour favor. It's a great way to do bread.

I've been wondering how this may translate to a camp Dutch oven. Before adding the bread to the kitchen Dutch oven it has to be preheated to 500 degrees. Then the temp is lowered to 475 and the bread is baked for 30 minutes - lowered to 450 and baked for 15 more.

The no knead method is pretty cool. You can get more information at Bread Making Videos — Bread Baking Instructional Videos and Baking Supplies.
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Old 02-24-2009, 10:41 AM   #115
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Cast iron resurrecting

How do I clean untended cast iron Dutch oven to get it back to a stage where it can be seasoned and then safely used fro cooking?

I inherited Grandpa Farnsworth’s camping gear including pots and pans (and nice cane fly rods). Seems he liked Griswold cast iron skillets and Dutch oven.

Where to begin? They’ve been sitting in a foot locker uncovered for 30+ years.
Some surface rust & old crud. Is lye soaking and brass brushing still done?
How do you resurrect without destroying old temper/patina?

The Dutch Oven lid has a small knob handle as opposed to lifting ring, can that characteristic be used to date /model id?
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Old 02-24-2009, 10:56 AM   #116
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Quote:
Originally Posted by davenpow View Post
This is to die for:

Hot Fudge Pudding Cake

Original recipe from Leonora Burton

8" (12") Dutch Oven
6 (10) bottom Briquettes
12 (16) top Briquettes
Serves 8 (10-12)

Bottom (double for 12" DO)
3/4 cup sugar
1 cup all-purpose flour
3 Tablespoons cocoa
2 teaspoons baking powder
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 cup milk
1/3 cup melted butter
1 & 1/3 teaspoons vanilla extract

Top (double for 12' DO)
3/4 cup sugar
1/2 cup brown sugar
4 Tablespoons cocoa
1 & 1/4 cups Hot Water


Mix the BOTTOM batter and beat until smooth. Pour
batter into an ungreased 8" DO (into 12" if you doubled it)

In the same bowl mix TOP dry ingredients, sprinkle evenly over batter.
Pour 1 & 1/4 cups hot water over top, Do Not Stir!

Bake with 6 (10) briquettes under and 12 (16) briquettes on top for
35-40 minutes or until center is almost set. Let stand for 15 minutes,
spoon into dessert dishes, spooning sauce from the bottom of DO over the top. Garnish with whipped topping if desired.

Enjoy!
Ted
Ted,

You were right! I finally had a chance to try this recipe this weekend. It was very easy an it is to die for! Thanks.

Any others you would like to share?
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:05 PM   #117
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Safari64 View Post
How do I clean untended cast iron Dutch oven to get it back to a stage where it can be seasoned and then safely used fro cooking?

I inherited Grandpa Farnsworth’s camping gear including pots and pans (and nice cane fly rods). Seems he liked Griswold cast iron skillets and Dutch oven.

Where to begin? They’ve been sitting in a foot locker uncovered for 30+ years.
Some surface rust & old crud. Is lye soaking and brass brushing still done?
How do you resurrect without destroying old temper/patina?

The Dutch Oven lid has a small knob handle as opposed to lifting ring, can that characteristic be used to date /model id?
You have a Griswold Dutch Oven? Grandpa was very good to you!

I've had great success with the electrolysis method. You can find info at the Wagner and Griswold Society here. I set mine up with a large Rubbermaid tub, a flat piece of air ducting metal from Home Depot curved around inside the tub, some heavy copper wire, and a car battery charger.

You will lose any old seasoning. I've done some really nasty stuff this way and they come out like unseasoned ware right off the factory line. The key is to season it again immediately or it will develop fine rust VERY quickly. Then start using it to build up that non-stick patina. This entire old Lodge dutch oven turned out like new.

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Old 02-24-2009, 02:16 PM   #118
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Thanks! I’ll try this method …if just for the science experiment. Looks great.

Grandpa also had Griswold 4, 8 and 12” skillets….maybe I’ll try cleaning them first.

I’ll try for before photos when it’s clear enough to work outside. The Dutch oven has an actual knob and no feet.
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:41 PM   #119
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I have cooked in cast iron skillets and Dutch ovens at home since my first child was small and we lived in West Virginia. I bought a beautiful old hammered Dutch oven in a junk store out there, that I don't think had ever really been washed. Someone told me to take an SOS pad to it, rinse it well and then reseason it, which I did and still use it to this day. I have picked up a number of cast iron items at flea markets and junk shops, use the same method with great success. I reseason items by coating them with vegetable oil and baking at about 250 degree oven for a couple of hours. If you don't use items regularly, a light coating of vegetable oil works well in between uses, or fry bacon or sausage in them periodically to get the same effect. They should never be washed with soap and water, of course, just water and a scrubbie if something sticks.
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Old 02-24-2009, 02:49 PM   #120
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Well, it worked just GREAT! I had worked up before this trip a recipe for a single loaf of bread, using the basic ingredients and added some leftover oatmeal from breakfast. Voila, beautifully risen and baked bread in our Dutch oven. It was yummy. ) I did take a picture, will try to load it and send in, we are a little techno-challenged. I have a couple of cast iron cooking cookbooks, and had read a recommendation for putting a trivet on the bottom of the Dutch oven when baking breads, cobblers, etc., to keep them from burning. We ordered a trivet from Lodge, who also has a cookbook, and I always use that for anything baked. I also always put baked items in a pan, and don't have the burnt bottom problem any more. I have heard that you can bake anything in a Dutch oven, and don't know why you couldn't, as long as it fit in there. ) I have never tried anything as adventurous as lasagna, that may be the next item---but I would feel compelled to line with foil, as I really hate scraping sticky messes out of things. But so fun!
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Old 02-24-2009, 05:25 PM   #121
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An old butcher told me suet was the thing to season cast iron. Heat up your oven. Cook a lump of suet in the iron vessel until the grease renders out. Rub the hot grease all around inside. After a while empty it out, turn upside down and cook it in the oven some more. The baked on grease is the best coating for the iron.
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Old 02-24-2009, 06:06 PM   #122
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ganaraska View Post
An old butcher told me suet was the thing to season cast iron. Heat up your oven. Cook a lump of suet in the iron vessel until the grease renders out. Rub the hot grease all around inside. After a while empty it out, turn upside down and cook it in the oven some more. The baked on grease is the best coating for the iron.
Lard works well too. After seasoning a pan with any animal fat care must be taken not to leave the pan unused for a long period or it can take on a rancid odor.
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Old 02-24-2009, 09:18 PM   #123
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Salt and paper towels (or scrubbies or crumpled up aluminum foil) work great for normal cleaning.

To start, I get out as much of the goo as I can. Next I put in a layer of kosher salt and let it set for a few minutes. I scrub the salt around to absorb and agitate the goo. Dump out the goo and repeat as necessary. If you do use water after the salt, heat the hand dried cast iron on low for a few minutes so it is thoroughly dried. Rub a coating of veggie oil all over the cast iron including the lip and outside and wipe off any excess.
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Old 02-25-2009, 03:13 PM   #124
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I cannot for the life of me figure out how to get the pic of our Dutch oven baked loaf loaded and in here. We did put the usual 12 briquets in a circle underneath, and put 23 on top because it is chilly and windy where we are camping on the SC coast. 23 were too many, will use a few less next time, the top got quite brown. I made one large-ish loaf in a heavy round cake pan, on a trivet. If you have never added a little cooked oatmeal to a bread recipe, it disappears into the loaf but helps it keep well--in addition to the nutrition boost.
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Old 02-25-2009, 04:46 PM   #125
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doug & maggie
You need to learn the "Rule of Three"
Using briquets, take your pot size ie: 8", 12", 14" etc.
Minus 3 and Plus 3, so if your cooking in a 12" pot, 12-3 =9 12+3= 15
so if you put 9 briquits under the put and 15 on top the temp inside is 325 degrees
for every 25 degree increase in temp you want, you add 1 under and 1 on top.
So lets say your cooking in an 8" pot and you want a temp of 400
for 325 it is 5 under and 11 on top, for 400 it is 8 under and 14 on top.
One thing that was stressed to me when being taught and that is turn the put
clockwise 1/4 of a turn every 15 minutes and turn the lid 1/4 of a turn counter
clockwise at the same time. This give a more even distrution of teh heat. Replace the coals every 45 to 60 minutes.
good luck cooking
Ted
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Old 02-25-2009, 06:54 PM   #126
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Quote:
Originally Posted by doug&maggie View Post
I cannot for the life of me figure out how to get the pic of our Dutch oven baked loaf loaded and in here. We did put the usual 12 briquets in a circle underneath, and put 23 on top because it is chilly and windy where we are camping on the SC coast. 23 were too many, will use a few less next time, the top got quite brown. I made one large-ish loaf in a heavy round cake pan, on a trivet. If you have never added a little cooked oatmeal to a bread recipe, it disappears into the loaf but helps it keep well--in addition to the nutrition boost.
Take a look at post #7 in this thread to post pictures:
http://www.airforums.com/forums/f138...ics-44928.html
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