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Old 01-11-2014, 11:01 AM   #29
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I agree Gary. My "first" attempt was with something that was not terribly temperature sensitive. I would want to play around and get some practice before trying any serious baking stuff. I was pleased with it and plan to haul it along when we hit the road in a few weeks. If nothing else it gives me a reason to sit outside. Nothing better than to watch a pot of water boil.
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Old 01-11-2014, 11:17 AM   #30
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Roger,

I'm at the enthusiast level, but one thing that I think some folks use too much heat and burn things. I did a bean soup and after you reach heat stage it only took a small amount of coals under it (fire cooking) to keep it going. A heat that creates a bacon cooking or hamburger cooking sound is a good starting point for heat.

Try a beef roast or pork loin with some taters and make a gravy as it finishes.

Keeping it clean, oiled and even slightly re-heated before storage is really necessary. Don't put it off to the side and clean tomorrow stuff, not good.

Gary
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Old 01-11-2014, 03:25 PM   #31
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I have a few cast iron pots & pans as well as a stove top dutch oven with a glass top. I think I usually clean them more aggressively than is necessary and always dry them with some stove top heat or residual oven heat. I've used them for years and they serve us well. This is my first go around with camp dutch oven cooking. I did fine this first go at it but you are right controlling the heat is the challenge. Have to see what's on the menu for the next time.

Thanks for the hints.
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Old 01-11-2014, 03:50 PM   #32
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I like my DOs (3) and have used them at home and at the campsite. They are heavy though. I am thinking of trying the Can Cooker in the small size; mostly because of the size and weight. The con will be cooking a cake, bread etc. Anyone have any experience with the CAN?
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Old 01-11-2014, 06:41 PM   #33
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Could you please tell me just what a CAN cooker is ???? Never heard of it.

O-Tay. Google is my friend. I got it, now I know what a CAN cooker is
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Old 01-14-2014, 02:26 PM   #34
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Will do. We're right next to you so the walk won't be too far

Karen
Thanks Karen! I now have exactly what I wanted which was different from what I originally asked about. I now have a 12 inch, 8 quart, 5 inch deep DO!! I'm looking forward to bread baking!!
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Old 01-14-2014, 03:31 PM   #35
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They still make the 12 "deep" Dutch don't they? Though that's not the best thing to do biscuits/cornbread etc.

Looking in thrift stores for used cast iron can work out very well. $1.00 or $2.00 per piece. Of course you've got to scrub, oil and re-season each piece which is a chore, but you can find good stuff.

Paula
I put an old piece of cast iron in the self clean cycle of the oven. It burns off all of the crust and returns the metal to like new. Only a minor washing is needed before seasoning.

Cold pressed Flax seed oil to season. It is all natural, and unlike grease or crisco, it is a drying oil. At high temp, it releases free radicals and "bonds" to the surface of the iron. Better than a Teflon finish.

Chemistry of Cast Iron Seasoning: A Science-Based How-To
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