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Old 01-23-2011, 08:16 AM   #29
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When we talk about baking bread in a Dutch Oven, we are talking the cast iron type and charcoal. I don't know if an aluminum one will perform the same way. We resisted for a bit getting a Dutch Oven, but now carry two and they are worth their weight.

I experimented with a single loaf of bread recipe, and got that down pretty well. You could do the same with whatever ingredients are your favorite. Ours always starts with a bit of leftover oatmeal, warm milk, a bit of sugar, yeast and some wheat flour to make a sponge. Beat well with a wooden spoon, add a little oil or melted butter, salt and enough flour to hold it all together and knead, etc., as you would for a larger batch. Works well every time.

Good luck.

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Old 01-23-2011, 08:22 AM   #30
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Thanks Maggie
I will keep my eye out for a cast iron oven.

In my bread... I keep a plastic pail of (mostly) cracked soya bean, flax, and 12-grain cereal. I add 3/4 cup to 1 cup water, microwave it for 2 minutes, let it sit for an hour or two (to soften) then add it when making the bread.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:26 AM   #31
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I would suggest using the Artisan Bread in 5 minutes a day recipe. That is the recipe I have been using for the last 2 or 3 years. I ended up switching to sourdough to break away from store bought yeast, but the artisan bread is very good. You make the dough one day, let it rise for a few hours, then toss the dough in the fridge. It can stay in the fridge for a week or more and you just break off some dough whenever you want to make bread. I'm not a fan of white flour so this recipe is very forgiving. I grind my own flour and have added oats, rye and various seeds over the years and they have all been good.

I'm struggling with the rice too. If you are a fan of white rice, then I agree with others that cooking on the stove or the oven would work well. I've recently discovered that brown medium grain is our favorite. Brown long grain worked well in my cheap rice cooker, but medium grain is too al dente for us and it takes about 75 minutes. I'm considering going with a programmable rice cooker/slow cooker. Anybody used one of them for medium brown rice or sprouted brown rice? Brand recommendation other than zojirushi?
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:36 AM   #32
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Here's a honey whole wheat recipe that I make using a cheap breadmaker (stored in the bottom of my closet) every week.

1-1/2 cups distilled water
4 cups King Arthur whole wheat flour
2 teaspoons salt
1/4 cup and 3 tablespoons honey
1 tablespoon and 1 teaspoon malted milk powder
2 tablespoons wheat gluten
2 tablespoons butter
2-1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast

Be sure to heat your water to 110-125 F and melt the butter before hand. I cook mine on the wheat cycle at the dark setting and this recipe always produces a delicious and moist 2 lb loaf. Using hard water instead of distilled will inhibit rising somewhat and the added wheat gluten is necessary to prevent the loaf from settling once it has risen. I slice mine into quite thin slices using an electric carving knife for sandwiches all week long.
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:37 AM   #33
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WineStream View Post
........ the artisan bread is very good. You make the dough one day, let it rise for a few hours, then toss the dough in the fridge. It can stay in the fridge for a week or more and you just break off some dough whenever you want to make bread.......
Just out of curiosity, what is it about this recipe that allows it to be kept in the refrigerator and not other doughs?
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Old 01-23-2011, 08:58 AM   #34
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OK, OK..... it is bread secrets time

-Honey is better then sugar... keeps the bread fresher longer
-Always add a tsp (or TBsp) lemon juice
-Always add 2 TBsp milk (or a 1/2C or more)
-Potato water is the best. When you drain your boiled potatoes NEVER throw it out. It will add 10-20% volume (and white dust to the top of the bread)

For beginners.... it is (usually) not you, or the yeast.
-it is the dry winter flour.... it require more liquid.

If I am traveling (flying) and I want to bring some bread for the trip.... I make a loaf with cornmeal (1/2C is C water, microwave it for 2 min) make a white loaf recipe, add extra honey an a 1/2C butter.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:11 AM   #35
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Here's a honey whole wheat recipe that I make using a cheap breadmaker (stored in the bottom of my closet) every week.
Thats pretty close to my wheat bread recipe, I hate machine loaves though. after the first rise I put the dough in bread pans to finish up. I am giving serious thought to getting a mixer but have been putting it off due to not knowing what I really need to get. The electric knife is an interesting idea, slicing is one of the bigger problems I am having.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:22 AM   #36
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When I made bread by hand..... I used a mixer to for the first half of the flour (and all the liquid). You need at least a 200W mixer. If you want to knead the dough... it has to be really big.

Now I use a mixer to cream butter (cookies and loaves), and for mash potatoes, I can't imagine bringing it on the AS though.

A quality bread knife will cost as much as an electric knife.... and doesn't need power.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:43 AM   #37
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Making Bread in the Airstream

I have posted a link that shows crock pot bread being made in a 27ft Airstream. The system works well and keeps the heat down in the trailer..and it makes great bread too!

YouTube - deauxrite's Channel
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:46 AM   #38
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Just out of curiosity, what is it about this recipe that allows it to be kept in the refrigerator and not other doughs?
I would expect that most basic bread dough recipes can be kept for a while. This recipe only has flour, salt, yeast and water in it. I believe that the long slow rise allows more flavor to develop. There is a difference in taste from the first loaf made vs the last loaf made from the dough. We love a really crusty, dense, flavorful bread. This is not a bread for someone wanting a soft sandwich style bread.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:51 AM   #39
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I've never used a rice cooker. The simplest way to describe the ratio of rice to water is to touch the bottom of the pan with your finger. Fill the pan with rice up to your first knuckle. Now add enough water to reach your second knuckle. Add salt, if desired, and bring to a rapid boil. Immediately turn the flame to it's lowest setting and cover. Do not stir the rice! Let the concoction sit covered for 20 minutes or so and then check to see that the water is completely gone by exploring with a fork. Because each propane stove may heat a little differently, you may have to adjust your cooking time. Once you're used to it, it's very easy. If the burner is too hot, even at it's lowest setting, raise the pot with a wire cooling rack or wok ring.
That's the way to do it!!!!!

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Old 01-23-2011, 09:53 AM   #40
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WineStream View Post
I would expect that most basic bread dough recipes can be kept for a while. This recipe only has flour, salt, yeast and water in it. I believe that the long slow rise allows more flavor to develop. There is a difference in taste from the first loaf made vs the last loaf made from the dough. We love a really crusty, dense, flavorful bread. This is not a bread for someone wanting a soft sandwich style bread.
That sounds like my kind of bread, although I am more partial to multi grain.
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Old 01-23-2011, 09:59 AM   #41
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Thanks for the tips Aname4me. I think what you are doing by adding the lemon juice is reducing hard water to pH neutral by adding acid. I do the same thing by using distilled water. Most people don't realize that their water's pH really does make a difference in how much the loaf rises.

Boondocker - I had slicing problems too. What I did was to drill two holes through my cutting board spaced as far apart as the loaf is wide and I drove chopsticks into each of them. I hold my carving knife against them and use them as guides for slicing and I can cut really thin uniform slices this way.
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Old 01-23-2011, 10:25 AM   #42
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[QUOTE=deauxrite;941521]I have posted a link that shows crock pot bread being made in a 27ft Airstream. The system works well and keeps the heat down in the trailer..and it makes great bread too!

I took a look at this..... I will have to try it.

That got me thinking..
I looked a RiceCooker bread.... I liked the mixing in the cooker bowl, but a bit tedious to cook.

I then looked a pressure cooker bread. Has anyone tried this? The gas stove might be a problem. Years ago, I saw some one (in England) using a diffuser plate over the flame to even out the heat.
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