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Old 04-24-2010, 06:08 PM   #15
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The veneers available today are really nice. I've been doing some cabinet work in quartered, figured Anigre, which has a quilted, irridescent quality that is really cool. It can be finished with a natural look to it or you can do crazy stuff like raspberry aniline dye, or charcoal stain, and the results are unbelievable.
For a less expensive mahogany-looking material there's Sapele, Lyptus, or brazilian cherry. If you can find real Honduras Mahogany it is "the bomb". All other Mahogs come after it in terms of having excellent looks, and excellent working qualities. I have saved some old mahogany counter tops from a remodel we did years ago, and some miscellaneous boards from here and there, and that, along with a bit of veneer could become the inside of my Safari. Here's a pic of honduran mahogany
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Old 04-24-2010, 10:27 PM   #16
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HOWDY from the LONE STAR STATE! All I can say is 'WOW'! Now did you say something about that beautiful canoe????

Just kidding.....great workmanship.....GOD BLESSED YOU!!!! Adios...Callie
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Old 04-24-2010, 11:13 PM   #17
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Tony - Hmmm... the idea of a cedar lined (or even accented) interior is really interesting, and I totally get the canoe inspiration.

Viking - That Anigre is beautiful and mahogany veneers could make for a really luxurious interior. Imagine a state-room of deep wine-stained mahogany, leather and polished aluminum. Wow!

Let's face it, the consideration to gut/refloor a 70's or 80's AS opens up a full range of custom finish choices never before available due to new wood technologies, past limits of cost, mass-production, styles and so-forth.

Lately I've noticed some really interesting uses of bamboo and wonder if that might also make a favorable light/strong/aesthetic/price option to cedar. This weekend at a environmental show here in Toronto there were some home renovators featuring kitchen cabinetry and home furniture made using cardboard, honeycomb wafer bamboo panels and more. I kind of dig the idea of choosing more environmentally sustainable materials throughout any AS renovation, so perhaps bamboo's a good approach?
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Old 04-25-2010, 12:56 AM   #18
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I picked up 3 sheets of 1/4" plywood bird eye and pillowed maple (seven footers) at a discount building supply place that were I believe where left over from Marathon million dollar motor coaches built up by Eugene Oregon. If they had 50 sheets I would of bought them all.

I don't know much about bamboo and various looks available or the weight of it. I will say in the past I thought the look had a tone or repetition to its pattern that made it look like a printed oak they use in low end SOB's. The reason I mention it is you have to sometimes live with a thing for awhile to know if it going to work. I did a kitchen once in purple heart a wood that is purple naturally. It goes from bright to darker almost brown over time. Well, anyway, I used it along with white laminate. I liked it. Then one day as I was sitting at the table looking at it, it hit me like a ton of bricks, it looked like it could of been painted wood because of the it having a uniformity of the grain to the point of no grain pattern. Now I have redone the kitchen in quarter saw oak. I attached a few of pics again. Sorry for their quality. The third picture is the back of a mirror built in Sapele. The plywood (veneer) back was from the same discount place mentioned above at $12.50 a sheet, pre finished. I bought 20 odd sheets. As Viking said You can't go wrong with Honduras Mahogany! Tony
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Old 04-25-2010, 01:06 AM   #19
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I have to question the use of bamboo, based on it's proximity to the end user. One of the paramount things to consider when trying to be environmentaly considerate, is the location and means of delivery to the end user. Balanced against the longevity of the product and the cost to produce it again, something that is local to the end user is prefered. We have an abundance of hard and soft woods that are at least as suitable for cabinet construction as bamboo is. Vertical grain fir and rift white oak are a couple of local local woods that are under-rated for use by most manufacturers of cabinetry. Rift white oak is the stuff wine barrels and casks are made from. it has a pronounced straight grain of fairly uniform lines but it also runs into quartersawn grain on ocassion, which is also called flame oak, for it's wild looking ray patterns that run across the grain of the wood



To keep it light is a matter of using a thin, light substrate, and a softwood support frame to hold it together.

Airstream really had the cabinet construction down pretty well by the time my '64 was built. The bulk of the cabinets were made from 1/4" fir plywood and pine frames. The bottom of the upper cabinets was a pine frame with 1/4" plywood under it. There are no backs or tops in the uppers, and no backs or bottoms in the lowers. Small doors are 3/8" plywood and large doors are 5/8" plywood. The surfaces were all oak veneer, except for the face frames on the front of each cabinet, which were solid oak.


Vertical grain fir has all straight lines of grain. It's a softwood that is used for door and window construction due to its' stability in changing climates. We use it for cabinets ocassionally too, but it's a look you have to really like, or you could end up going INSANE! Something about all those straight lines, over, and over, and over....



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Originally Posted by pauluptime View Post

Lately I've noticed some really interesting uses of bamboo and wonder if that might also make a favorable light/strong/aesthetic/price option to cedar. This weekend at a environmental show here in Toronto there were some home renovators featuring kitchen cabinetry and home furniture made using cardboard, honeycomb wafer bamboo panels and more. I kind of dig the idea of choosing more environmentally sustainable materials throughout any AS renovation, so perhaps bamboo's a good approach?
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Old 04-25-2010, 07:59 AM   #20
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You do beautiful, beautiful work, Tony. My Danish grandpa, Dida, was a carpenter on Long Island, NY, and I am fortunate to own their oak dining room set----two pieces of which he made, a buffet and a sideboard. There is nothing like things you make with your own hands (or those of your ancestors), whatever they may be.

Good luck in your search for the perfect Airstream.

Maggie
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Old 04-25-2010, 10:54 AM   #21
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Wow!

Beautiful work!!! I would love to see your work in an Airstream! Wish you lived closer by to Ohio so I could come and drool in person.Hope you find one so that you can get to work! It will be a labor of love.
Thanks for the pictures!
Lou
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Old 04-25-2010, 06:47 PM   #22
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A-ha moment

Thanks Tony and Viking! Thanks to you both I just learned the woodgrains I find most visually compelling are the random natural grains, for example the sycamore trim in my A6. I've always been a fan of birdseye maple too.

I've always believed character lies in the imperfect, the out of order and that over time, it really is easier to live with character than monotonous uniformity. I tell my wife that all the time.

Here's a sample of the sycamore that was used in my Audi.
Not that it would be at all within my budget or objective purpose for my own AS, I wonder how some of the most opulent interiors ever done in an AS look like.... another thread, no doubt.

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Old 04-26-2010, 11:34 AM   #23
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That looks like curly sycamore, or a burl of sycamore.
I also gravitate towards the non-uniform/ unusual looking materials. It keeps life interesting.

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