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Old 08-03-2009, 03:42 PM   #1
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1967 Tradewind Bellypan removal-questions

I'm just getting started with the renovation on our Tradewind and am interested on what others did as far as the belly pan removal. I was kind of surprised that the pan is basically two sheets that runs the entire length of the trailer. Do I need to remove the axles? I need to replace them anyways so maybe now is the time. I need to replace some rear floor and am thinking I should remove the bellypan to make it a bit easier. Maybe I can just drop the rear portion do any frame paint and or repair that way? Maybe the trailer needs to be jacked up so high that the tires are off the ground, then the axles can be removed to replace bellypan? I did a search but did not have a lot of luck.

Thanks,

Michael
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Old 08-03-2009, 04:37 PM   #2
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I've yet to drop my bellypan, too. I'm looking forward to your responses.
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Old 08-03-2009, 05:11 PM   #3
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The belly pan was one of the first things that I removed in my teardown. I jacked up the trailer and leveled it. I also loosened the bolts that hold the axles on and was then able to pull the pan through the gap. I wanted to be able to paint both sides of the frame with POR-15 before I installed the new floorboards. I also wanted to use the same mounting holes for the floorboards and was able to back drill the ply from the bottom. It also allowed me to put nuts on the mounting hardware.
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Old 08-03-2009, 05:12 PM   #4
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Unless the belly pan is in really bad shape, I would not replace it. That is an expense that you can save, because you will have lots more you didn't plan for! The rear portion under the black tank needs to be removed to gain access to the rear floor area. I have a 68 TW with the rear completely out and all the new wood fitted and ready to reinstall. I also remove the banana wrap on either side because it made it much easier to get the old floor out and fit the new one. Take time to read all the posts you can about floor replacement, what you need to know is there. Just take a lot of pictures as you go, especially of the plumbing and how everything fits together.

Also, a lot of the trim in the bath can not be easly replaced! Treat all the plastic with care so you can reuse the trim. You need to start from the front taking things apart and work your way back to the bath. Can't get the tube out any other way.

Finally, be realistic about your time line. Things will take much longer to finish than you think they will. Trust me on that.


Good luck
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Old 08-03-2009, 05:37 PM   #5
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For some reason the bellypan intimidates me. ALL work that I do I will be doing by myself., so when I see pieces of aluminum sheet as large as those on the belly it scares me.

68TWind, guess what? I did it the opposite of the way you suggested, probably made it much tougher on myself. I have the rear bathroom completely removed TUB included. I included pictures of the position of the tub coming out the door. (I did have to remove the gaucho bed though abd the bathroom divider.
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Old 08-03-2009, 05:39 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aerowood View Post
The belly pan was one of the first things that I removed in my teardown. I jacked up the trailer and leveled it. I also loosened the bolts that hold the axles on and was then able to pull the pan through the gap. I wanted to be able to paint both sides of the frame with POR-15 before I installed the new floorboards. I also wanted to use the same mounting holes for the floorboards and was able to back drill the ply from the bottom. It also allowed me to put nuts on the mounting hardware.
How high did you jack up the trailer and what and where did you support it?

Thanks,

Mike
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Old 08-03-2009, 05:50 PM   #7
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I jacked it up high enough that the tires were just off the ground. I used screw jacks under each axle mounting plate, two fwd on the A-frame and two on the rear just fwd of the bumper. The trailer stayed there for around a year and a half.
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Old 08-03-2009, 10:55 PM   #8
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Don't let the bellypan worry you. It's not hard to remove. I just dropped mine the other day and it was really easy. The mess is the hard part to deal with. I'm doing a major remodel on mine and I took the floor out from above first. Then I was able to clean up and get rid of the insulation and droppings with a shop vac. If you are dropping the pan first wear a respirator and full face shield, even when drilling out the rivets.
When the new axle goes in make sure there's enough room for the pan to slide in and out again. You may save yourself some time the next time the pan has to be dropped.
If you haven't already, check out the major restorations in the forum under general repair forum. I read them once in a while just to get the order of things under control, somewhat, and for entertainment!

Rich
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Old 08-04-2009, 08:23 AM   #9
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Probably misstated the fear

What intimidates me about the bellypan is not the removal, it's the reinstall. I can tear things apart with the best of them! Going to take some advice and get the whole trailer up on some jacks, this will afford a little more space to work while also having it ready to accept new axles. I'd do the axles now but don't want to install them and let her sit on them for who knows how long.
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Old 08-04-2009, 09:15 AM   #10
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I used smaller pieces to make up the belly pan. Basically 5' x ~8' for the simple flat sections where possible and then smaller, more manageable 2' x 8' pieces for the corners.

http://www.airforums.com/forums/show...&postcount=127

It worked quite well for my project.
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Old 08-04-2009, 09:38 AM   #11
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You will not have it to bad when you go to put on the belly pan. I put mine up on cardboard box's and once you get a few rivets in you have it made. One thing I found out when you get it off if you can take a water hose with a strong spray tip and spray down the fiberglass insulation and the rest of the stuff that will be in there. When it gets wet it will fall off and you do not have all the dust and fiberglass in the air. I let mine sit a day and just raked it up and baged it up. Plus it cleans up the bottom of the trailer some. But it is still a mess. Have fun
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Old 08-04-2009, 09:40 AM   #12
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I did the same but was able to get away with 4"X5" as my trailer is so much shorter. It was much a lot more manageable that way.
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Old 08-04-2009, 09:40 AM   #13
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Mike,

I have a '66 Safari and have just gone through the bellypan drop. Check out my blog if you would like to see some pictures of what you are about to do. I was a bit apprehensive before I did it, but now view it as "no big deal." Experience is one hell of a teacher!

Good luck and definitely wear eye protection.
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Old 04-06-2011, 09:32 AM   #14
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Question Belly Pan on 64

My belly pan is in 2 sheets. There are no holes, but I want to be able to check everything down there, and possibly replace the insulation, and while I'm there, I may take measurements on putting in grey water tanks since I don't have them now.

However, my issue is that my belly pan is in great shape, and that on the 64, it is buck riveted to the sides right near the bottom.

It looks like I should be able to take out the rivets down the cener overlap, and then drop the pan on the ground. The AS is on 8 jack stands now, and the tires aren't touching. I'm taking the axles off anyway to replace them, so they will be out of the way.

In the end, it seems like the belly pan would hang down from the sides, and I would maybe have like a 3 foot gap down the center where the two sides of the belly pan wouldn't touch.

If you're only painting the frame, and not replacing the belly pan, can I leave the sides buck riveted on? I realize it will be a hassle, but as much as installing a couple hundred olympic bulb rivets?
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