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Old 06-07-2018, 03:15 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveSueMac View Post
I got non-beveled edges and non-stainless screws. It's a feature, not a bug?

On yours - do the screws come all the way out? Mine seem stuck on some clip I can't see. I can't imagine there's a clip behind the skin?? I'm sure I'm missing something VERY simple or doing something VERY stupid! Just want to get one out to bring to a HW store for the stainless version.....
Loosen them both. The furnace door will come open and there is a clip behind the furnace door. You have to open the furnace door to remove the clip. You can not take just one screw out.
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Old 06-07-2018, 03:34 PM   #16
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Loosen them both. The furnace door will come open and there is a clip behind the furnace door. You have to open the furnace door to remove the clip. You can not take just one screw out.


A-ha!!!! Thank you! Will try that tonight.
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Old 06-07-2018, 04:59 PM   #17
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I had a '05 30' slideout model that I had several dc electrical problems due to poor electrical practices, namely using crimp connectors on the motors that operate the slide. It caused me a lot of headaches since I was in Florida and had to figure it out myself. The same thing with the car stereo cd/dvd player, it was a rats nest of wiring and one of the speakers was wired incorrectly. There was no separation of the left and right channels on the outside hookups. It took me a good while to troubleshoot this and correct the problem. I've had three Airstreams and the '05 was by far the worst as far as fundamental electrical procedures were concerned. I told the service manager, Chris Birch, that they should solder all dc connections and that would probably solve a lot of warranty claims. However, many owners are like me and solve the problems themselves. We owners get to be the guinea pigs on their products. I would never by a new one, they should be perfect for what they cost.
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Old 06-07-2018, 05:48 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stosh View Post
I had a '05 30' slideout model that I had several dc electrical problems due to poor electrical practices, namely using crimp connectors on the motors that operate the slide. It caused me a lot of headaches since I was in Florida and had to figure it out myself. The same thing with the car stereo cd/dvd player, it was a rats nest of wiring and one of the speakers was wired incorrectly. There was no separation of the left and right channels on the outside hookups. It took me a good while to troubleshoot this and correct the problem. I've had three Airstreams and the '05 was by far the worst as far as fundamental electrical procedures were concerned. I told the service manager, Chris Birch, that they should solder all dc connections and that would probably solve a lot of warranty claims. However, many owners are like me and solve the problems themselves. We owners get to be the guinea pigs on their products. I would never by a new one, they should be perfect for what they cost.

Hi Stosh - I definitely agree on the rat's next behind the stereo. I've had my locker open and what a mess. Actually have to get back in it to clean things up a bit. Just have to dedicate some time to deal with it.

I haven't had any issues with my slide. Do you still have your slide? We've got a couple of different threads on slide-outs. In fact there's a Slide-Out Society Registry here on the forum. No obligations, fees etc... just a place for Slide-Out Owners to share info. See: http://www.airforums.com/forums/f366...ry-159166.html

Tom - Slide-Out Society Registry Member #025
AlumaSlider Get-Together, 28-30 Sep 2018, Stone Mountain SP, NC
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Old 06-08-2018, 01:47 PM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GMFL View Post
Loosen them both. The furnace door will come open and there is a clip behind the furnace door. You have to open the furnace door to remove the clip. You can not take just one screw out.


Hey GMFL - you were 100% spot on! That was vexing me for weeks! I'm a bit slow in the mechanical field

Awesome - worked perfectly. Unfortunately, my local Ace Hardware had nothing the matched - the threads don't seem to fit the standard or metric testers they have in the store....

I emailed AS service to see if they can mail me some stainless screws for the door.

Really appreciate the insight!!!
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Old 06-08-2018, 08:46 PM   #20
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Welcome. Anytime.
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Old 06-13-2018, 09:43 AM   #21
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Stainless steel and Aluminum

I would be cautious using stainless steel screws passing through Aluminum. The stainless will cause the Aluminum to corrode. I would recommend galvanized screws.
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Old 06-13-2018, 09:49 AM   #22
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To late
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Old 06-13-2018, 10:33 AM   #23
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Originally Posted by jaacina View Post
I would be cautious using stainless steel screws passing through Aluminum. The stainless will cause the Aluminum to corrode. I would recommend galvanized screws.
I was thinking the same about SS and Al together. I did not know that galvanized should be used. I have not heard this recommendation before.

After reading this I googled and came up with this from www.hunker.com:

Galvanic Corrosion
The process of galvanic corrosion occurs when two different metals are touching each other in the presence of an electrolyte, a fluid that allows the flow of electrons from one metal to the other. As the process continues, one of the metals will deteriorate quickly as its electrons flow steadily to the other metal. When you fasten aluminum using screws made from a different metal, especially in situations where the metal is exposed to salt water, galvanic corrosion may cause significant deterioration of the aluminum base metal.

Aluminum Screws
Because galvanic corrosion happens when dissimilar metals come into contact with each other, the simplest way to prevent the process is to use screws made from the same metal as the metal you're fastening. Aluminum screws will not cause corrosion in aluminum base metal, even if the screws aren't plated or treated with any corrosion-resistant material.

Carbon Steel Screws
Unplated steel screws will cause corrosion in aluminum in a wet environment. They'll rust quickly themselves, as well, so they're not a good choice for fastening aluminum. Galvanized steel screws, however, are plated with a corrosion-resistant coating, usually consisting of zinc, that is not nearly as reactive with aluminum. The zinc plating prevents the underlying steel from coming into contact with the aluminum, and the risk of corrosion of the aluminum is reduced significantly.

Stainless Steel Screws
Stainless steel is an alloy of carbon steel that is, itself, resistant to corrosion. However, stainless steel is reactive with aluminum, and when a stainless steel screw is in contact with an aluminum base metal, the aluminum is likely to corrode. As is the case with carbon steel screws, a plated stainless steel screw is less likely to corrode aluminum; screws treated with a high-quality coating consisting of zinc and aluminum flakes are especially resistant to corrosion.


What about using Aluminum screws? Too soft?
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Old 06-13-2018, 10:45 AM   #24
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Not too late yet, GMFL - haven't heard back from the factory

I'm all for the right non-rusting non-corrosive metal - but the thread pattern doesn't fit either metric or standard???

Weird. Do others have this problem with your kit?
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Old 06-13-2018, 11:16 AM   #25
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Quality from Factory

Looking forward to retirement in near future, buying our dream 28 Intl and hitting the road. Have run 5 or 6 aerospace factories over the years and have to say I was a bit surprised/disappointed in the condition of the AS factory when we took the tour a year ago. Not surprised to read of the variety of quality issues people encounter. Basic work practices and FOD (foreign object) awareness and corrective action processes would go a long way to improve the quality of their delivered product. Hopefully they are working on it!
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Old 06-13-2018, 12:00 PM   #26
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Cat

When we bought our Excella new in 1989, I pointed out on the bathroom sink countertop that they had used several small pieces (1", 2"...) in several places instead of one or two continuous pieces of tape to seal the edges. Of course, many years later there are gaps between these pieces. The "wallpaper" in two places at the top & corner, was wrinkled showing the pressboard not plywood underneath. I asked the dealer about repairing both of these and was told, "can't do anything about it". I agree 100%, the shell is beautiful, it tows great, but for the price you pay for an AS, it should be good down to the frame! To me it's the old saying, you do the right thing even if nobody is looking! It's your reputation.
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Old 06-13-2018, 12:31 PM   #27
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Thor focused on quantity not quality

Orders for AS are evidently backed up 18 months, according to the tour guide at JC. With that kind of production pressure, what incentive does Thor have to improve quality, especially when the dealers are on the hook for warranty work?

Those of us old enough to remember will recall that quality issues were what fundamentally damaged the domestic auto industry in the 1970s and allowed the ascent of foreign auto makers (who were laser focused on quality at reasonable price points), while GM, Ford and Chrysler were focused on increasing production and "planned obsolescence," a disastrous policy that nearly destroyed them all, and from which they are still recovering forty years later, despite later "finding Jesus" and increasing their quality. Their Brand was deeply tarnished in the minds of consumers.

AS is largely coasting on it's (undeserved) brand reputation and will likely suffer a similar fate. I see no signs whatsoever that quality is a core corporate value. Year after year after year, they continue to use inferior materials, eschew modern best-manufacturing practices, tolerate jaw-dropping production flaws, and whatever effort goes into engineering and design seems largely to be confined to cosmetic co-branding with other companies. JC is building a new R&D wing, something that offers a glimmer of hope, but it is telling that a brand over 80 years old is just now getting into systematic testing. (Yes, the caravans Wally did a half-century ago were that generation's field testing)

I hope AS can pull it together; they are in the best position to be the quality leader in their market segment, but if they continue on the path they now race, another will seize the opening they leave. For us, we can be thankful that the shells of older vehicles can at least be salvaged and rebuilt properly at last.
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Old 06-13-2018, 01:01 PM   #28
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rzrbrn View Post
I was thinking the same about SS and Al together. I did not know that galvanized should be used. I have not heard this recommendation before.

After reading this I googled and came up with this from www.hunker.com:

Galvanic Corrosion
The process of galvanic corrosion occurs when two different metals are touching each other in the presence of an electrolyte, a fluid that allows the flow of electrons from one metal to the other. As the process continues, one of the metals will deteriorate quickly as its electrons flow steadily to the other metal. When you fasten aluminum using screws made from a different metal, especially in situations where the metal is exposed to salt water, galvanic corrosion may cause significant deterioration of the aluminum base metal.

Aluminum Screws
Because galvanic corrosion happens when dissimilar metals come into contact with each other, the simplest way to prevent the process is to use screws made from the same metal as the metal you're fastening. Aluminum screws will not cause corrosion in aluminum base metal, even if the screws aren't plated or treated with any corrosion-resistant material.

Carbon Steel Screws
Unplated steel screws will cause corrosion in aluminum in a wet environment. They'll rust quickly themselves, as well, so they're not a good choice for fastening aluminum. Galvanized steel screws, however, are plated with a corrosion-resistant coating, usually consisting of zinc, that is not nearly as reactive with aluminum. The zinc plating prevents the underlying steel from coming into contact with the aluminum, and the risk of corrosion of the aluminum is reduced significantly.

Stainless Steel Screws
Stainless steel is an alloy of carbon steel that is, itself, resistant to corrosion. However, stainless steel is reactive with aluminum, and when a stainless steel screw is in contact with an aluminum base metal, the aluminum is likely to corrode. As is the case with carbon steel screws, a plated stainless steel screw is less likely to corrode aluminum; screws treated with a high-quality coating consisting of zinc and aluminum flakes are especially resistant to corrosion.


What about using Aluminum screws? Too soft?

How long does that galvanizing corrosion take?...'likely to corrode' ?

We replaced all MS screws on the 63 Safari & the Classic with stainless.
30yrs, still waiting. 😳

Bob
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