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Old 06-05-2011, 12:15 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SilverCottage View Post
Here is the one I have used for the past 4 years with Mobil 1 synthetic grease:

Lisle 34550 Handy Packer Bearing Packer

Attachment 131594
Highly recommended with 8 bearings to pack, it saves mess and lots of time vs hand packing.
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Old 06-05-2011, 01:06 PM   #16
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As you can see everyone has their own way to adjust wheel bearings, which is OK, but the bearing manufactures, auto, truck and axle manufactures say the final check should be to check end-play with a dial indicator and check to see that you have correct end-play. Maybe this will ease your mind.
http://www.timken.com/en-us/solution...gs_English.pdf
Good luck!
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File Type: pdf Proper_Tapered_Bearing_Settings.pdf (216.0 KB, 39 views)
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Old 06-05-2011, 01:08 PM   #17
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The reason not to pack the cavity in the hub (besides it wastes a lot of grease) is that heat will be retained by the glob of grease and the wheel will run hotter.

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Old 06-05-2011, 01:32 PM   #18
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Jacked the trailer up, knocked the dust caps off on the wheels where I tightened the nut to get rid of play at finger tight. Adjusted the castle nut to the first hole at finget tight. I do have some play. Went for a 30 mile road test and the hubs feel cooler. Guess I'm just a worrier. Thanks for all the help.
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Old 06-05-2011, 01:38 PM   #19
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Years ago, a 5 to 7 foot pound bearing preload was used. That has not been used for a long time. The accepted way today, is to tighten the bearing retainer nut, just to the tight position. THEN, back off to the next slot in the nut. Grab ahold of the tire and see if you can feel a very slight "slop." If not, then back up one more slot on the nut. When done, a slight slop must be felt. That indicates a very small play, instead of being overly tightened. As the bearings warm up, some of that slight play will go away, as opposed to being very tight, which will cause the bearings and races to overheat.
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Old 06-05-2011, 02:18 PM   #20
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Tapered roller bearings will run for a long long time even if adjusted too loose - but only for a very short time if adjusted too tight. Always err on the side of loose rather than tight with tapered roller bearings in wheel mounting applications.

In those cases where these bearings are used to precisely position shafts or must operate w/o any loads, some form of compliance ("give") in mounting is often used to generate a specific preload that insure precise positioning and prevent unloaded operation, which causes problems due to roller skidding.

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Old 06-05-2011, 02:35 PM   #21
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I was always taught to place fresh grease inside the hub. Too much grease in either place (the hub or bearing) is bad . According to the training I have received and have followed is the heat of the driving melts the grease and it turns more to a oil , not like oil You can pour but less solid than the grease consistency. As this cycle happens the grease breaks down (that is in actual contact with the bearing) and by having extra grease in the hub it is a place for extra , some of the oils released as it heats migrate towards the bearings and help. Now all I can say is that was how I learned it. It could be all bull but it makes sense. We have large AC motors at work in the 750-1000hp range and if You take the plug out of the bearing housing you can watch these "oils" leak out when it is hot and yes these motor shafts are on roller bearings. So just another opinion for everyone to consider.
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Old 06-05-2011, 03:31 PM   #22
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My understanding is that grease is rated as to drip temperature. Since I don't feel like walking down to the shop and read the can, memory is that wheel bearing grease is supposed to be somewhere from 350 to 500˚ before it drips.

mile', it is good to worry about getting this right. I've had bearings fail on the road and it is not a lot of fun. Fortunately we were less than a mile from the campground we were going to, but I spent a lot of time getting part numbers and getting parts, driving back 40 miles to the NAPA, fixing damage and putting it all back together. It all started with someone at a tire dealer saying I had the wheel too loose and then he tightened it more than one whole turn.

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Old 06-05-2011, 03:58 PM   #23
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I always use wheel bearing grease rated for disc brakes....
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Old 06-05-2011, 07:50 PM   #24
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All the advise given here is spot on. Can't say it any better but I will say it again. "Looser is better than tighter". I see nothing wrong with a little extra grease in the dust cover but don't pack it in there. You'll know if you have too much the next time you remove the wheel ( or hubcap ) cause you'll see it splattered all over. Then you'll know what you did. Clean it up and don't do that again. The true test of time will always tell. A hand on your hubs frequently will always tell you if your headed towards trouble. The digital thermometers are just the high tech way of doing just that. And they keep your hands clean too. Bye the way, I don't have one. At least not yet. I do carry a couple of old ( but servicable ) seals and bearings to get me out of trouble. Just in case.

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Old 06-05-2011, 07:59 PM   #25
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I know some guys that put extra grease in the hub caps so if at some point they need to replace a bearing in an emergency they will have grease at hand and get going again....
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Old 06-05-2011, 10:06 PM   #26
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Thanks for all the help guys! I'm happy with where I'm set now. I ran about 90 miles today just to check everything and my hubs were all cool to the touch. This was all good advice! If I would have gone with what I leared in the past I'm guessing I would have had problems down the road. Lopez Island will be the first camping trip in the trailer since we've owned it!
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Old 06-09-2011, 04:44 AM   #27
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Long reading but here is support for the oil from the grease is what really lubricates Your bearings.
http://mountingmanager.schaeffler.co...KSZvDgs_LUxz_R

1.1.4 Lubricating Film with Grease
Lubrication
With lubricating greases, bearing lubrication is mainly effected by the base oil, small quantities of which are separated
by the thickener over time. The principles of the EHD theory also apply to grease lubrication. For calculating the viscosity ratio = /1 the operating viscosity of the base oil is applied. Especially with low values the thickener and the
additives increase the lubricating effect.

If a grease is known to be appropriate for the application in hand – e.g. the FAG Arcanol rolling bearing greases (see
page 57) – and if good cleanliness and sufficient relubrication are ensured the same K2 values can be assumed as for
suitably doped oils. If such conditions are not given, a factor from the lower curve of zone II should be selected for determining the a23II value, to be on the safe side. This applies especially if the specified lubrication interval is not observed.

The selection of the right grease is particularly important for bearings with a high sliding motion rate and for large and
heavily stressed bearings. In heavily loaded bearings the lubricating effect of the thickener and the right doping are of
particular importance.

Only a very small amount of the grease participates actively in the lubricating process. Grease of the usual consistency
is for the most part expelled from the bearing and settles at the bearing sides or escapes from the bearing via the seals.
The grease quantity remaining on the running areas and clinging to the bearing insides and outsides continuously separates the small amount of oil required to lubricate the functional surfaces. Under moderate loads the grease quantity remaining between the rolling contact areas is sufficient for lubrication over an extended period of time.

The oil separation rate depends on the grease type, the base oil viscosity, the size of the oil separating surface, the grease temperature and the mechanical stressing of the grease. The effect of the grease thickener becomes
apparent when the film thickness is measured as a function of operating time. On start-up of the bearing a film
thickness, depending on the type of thickener, develops in the contact areas which is clearly greater than that of the
base oil.

Grease alteration and grease displacement quickly cause the film thickness to be reduced, fig. 13. In spite of a possibly reduced film thickness a sufficient lubricating effect is maintained throughout the lubrication interval. The thickener and the additives in the grease decisively enhance the lubricating effect so that no life reduction has to be expected.

For long lubrication intervals, the grease should separate just as much oil as needed for bearing lubrication. In this way, oil separation over a long period is ensured. Greases with a base oil of very high viscosity have a smaller oil separation rate. In this case, adequate lubrication is only possible by packing the bearing and housing with grease to capacity or short relubrication intervals.

The lubricating effect of the thickener becomes particularly evident in the operation of rolling bearings in the mixed friction range.

FAG 12
13: Ratio of the grease film thickness to the base oil film thickness as a function of operating time Grease film thickness
Base oil thickness
t
0 10 20 30 40 50 120
1.0
2.0
min
0
Lubricant in Rolling Bearings
Functions of the Lubricant in Rolling Bearings
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Old 06-14-2011, 10:46 PM   #28
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Other threads discuss the need for all this bearing work so I'll not go into that topic. Fact is, it's proper maintenance. But it's obvious after my recent repair bill for bearing/brake/rotation maintenance that I'm going to have to learn to do this myself. We just had our 2008 23' CCD wheels and axles checked. The job included repacking four wheels; rotating tires; checking brakes (65% remaining). Cost was $556 plus maybe $23 in lube/grease/etc. Not including the $129 for an hour's worth of labor to locate and fix the propane leak under the steps. So I'm going to get myself some tools and perhaps an IR temp sensor to monitor bearing temps, as that's a big indicator of problems.
Then this topic of tightening bearings will make much more sense.
Is this really something that can be done at home by a handy trailer owner? I've repairs bicycles? Does that count?
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