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Old 09-16-2003, 02:43 PM   #1
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Torque wrench..necessary?

Is it necessary to torque the studs on the wheels to a certain lb.age? I think I have aluminum/alloy (Alcoa brand) rims. I would like to take them off to clean the inside.

Most of my life I have had steel wheels and hubcaps and went with getting the nuts as tight as I could and it worked. Does Brenda have to wish for a torque wrench for Christmas?
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Old 09-16-2003, 04:12 PM   #2
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I believe you can actually crack aluminum wheels by over-tightening the lug nuts. Even worse, if you don't get them tight enough they will loosen up. Get a torque wrench and follow the wheel manufacturers recommendations.
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Old 09-16-2003, 05:24 PM   #3
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Torque wrench

Yes, a torque wrench is a must-have, particularly with alloy wheels.

What you are trying to achieve is clamp force. Basically, the wheel nut is tightened to a percentage of proof load for the stud. By doing this, the stud is stretched into the elastic zone for the material and retains clamp force as operating loads are imposed on the assembly.

Torque is the only practical indicator of clamp force in user applications. Sophisticated tools (such as torque-angle control) can be applied during manufacturing but aren't practical for users.

A problem with torque is sensitivity to factors such as corrosion on studs and technique of the operator. That said, it's what we have to work with and is valuable for keeping joints together.
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Old 09-16-2003, 05:25 PM   #4
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Jerry is right, in my opinion.
Alloy wheel lug nuts or lug bolts should be torqued to 100ft/lb.
Some wheels with steel inserts use different torque settings, but generally 100 is ok.
A torque wrench will help tighten all the lugs the same, which is important for alloy because if it's heat expansion.
Uneven wheel torque can cause cracks in the alloy over time. It can also cause brake drum and brake disc distortion in certain cases.
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Old 09-16-2003, 05:28 PM   #5
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OK, the torque wrench is on Brenda's Christmas wish list. Does the same 100 lbs. torque go for the Expedition also?

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Old 09-16-2003, 05:43 PM   #6
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Kistler refer to your owners manual you will need to torque alcoa wheels to 80-90 ft LBS .

When you are torquing wheels always loosen then re-torque. If you keep torquing the wheel and never loosening them first. You will eventaully be way over torque...
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Old 09-16-2003, 05:51 PM   #7
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Thank you all, the world has really gotten complicated. 80-90 OK....guess I am going to order Brenda a torque wrench that has variable lb.age
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Old 09-16-2003, 05:59 PM   #8
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If you get the click type one from Sears that has the twisting handle adjustment, then make sure to return it to "0" after every use. do not leave it at the 90lb setting for a long time.
These torque wrenches work well, but they do not carry the craftsman replacement warranty. I do not recommend the pointer and scale ones. They are notoriously inaccurate to the novice user.
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Old 09-16-2003, 06:19 PM   #9
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then make sure to return it to "0" after every use. do not leave it at the 90lb setting for a long time.
It will also need periodic calibration. Store it in a place where it won't get dropped, banged, etc. Only use it to set torque not tighten or it will soon be nothing but an expensive breaker bar.

John
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Old 09-16-2003, 06:56 PM   #10
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I suppose Snap-on Tools has one???? I also suppose they are expensive+++++
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Old 09-16-2003, 07:08 PM   #11
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Snap on

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Old 09-16-2003, 07:33 PM   #12
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''Torque - Stick"

Look into a 'torque-stick" available from NAPA, et al.

It is an extension that goes on the end of an air/electric impact wrench. They are rated/color coded based on torque specs and lug nut size.

If you have the tool(s) to power it, you just may wind up with enough left over to buy Brenda a nice diamond ring for Christmas. If not, you've got justification (it's a matter of safety) for buying more Power Tools - you can never have enough

Regards,
Jeff
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Old 09-16-2003, 09:11 PM   #13
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Exclamation Note this important fact!

Kistler
After you re-installed your wheels and, you've torqued them to the specification.
Just keep this important note in mind:
(Recommendation from the A/S factory)
Check the lug nuts again after you've driven 25 miles and, once more after you've driven no more than 100 miles. (these miles are approx but, close enough.)
You should be in good shape after that..

BTW, sounds like you're going thru alot of trouble just to clean the inside of your wheels..

ciao
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Old 01-10-2016, 06:55 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by alan View Post
Yes, a torque wrench is a must-have, particularly with alloy wheels.

What you are trying to achieve is clamp force. Basically, the wheel nut is tightened to a percentage of proof load for the stud. By doing this, the stud is stretched into the elastic zone for the material and retains clamp force as operating loads are imposed on the assembly.

Torque is the only practical indicator of clamp force in user applications. Sophisticated tools (such as torque-angle control) can be applied during manufacturing but aren't practical for users.

A problem with torque is sensitivity to factors such as corrosion on studs and technique of the operator. That said, it's what we have to work with and is valuable for keeping joints together.
DITTO! And keep the greases, oils, etc. off the studs, or risk overstretching them. "Lube Torque" is for those who know how to use it.
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