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Old 06-18-2018, 08:08 PM   #1
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Replaced and packed bearings, please check my work:)

Hello,

This past weekend I replaced my trailer bearings. This was my first time doing this.. I, of course, read instructions online and in my AS manual, but now I am second guessing myself so I'd like some assurance that I did it properly.

I removed tires, castle nut and then the hub. I then removed old bearings and seal. I bought new bearings and seals so I didn't bother cleaning the old stuff. I cleaned inside of hub, and I packed the bearings with mobile 1 grease. I reassembled the hubs, and then placed back on spindle (which was cleaned). I then installed spindle washer and castle nut. I tightened castle nut to 50 ft lbs and then backed it off until nut was lose, and then tightened it hand tight. Once hand tight, I installed cotter pin and then installed grease cap (which I also cleaned).


Aside from grease on/in the bearings, I rubbed a little on the spindle and that was it for grease. Did I use enough? I've read some conflicting info online.


One thing I DID NOT do was change the races. They looked good, felt totally smooth so I decided to not change them.

We have about a 1200 mile trip coming up next month.. I have these visions of my tires falling off! I do plan on keeping a spare set incase something where to go wrong.. any comments? thanks
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Old 06-18-2018, 08:42 PM   #2
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Look anything like this?...picture my hand IN the glove.😂
I would do the castle nut a bit more than hand tight. After seating, I tighten 'til NO play then back-off 1/4 turn.👍
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Old 06-18-2018, 08:49 PM   #3
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yes, but it looks like your grease cap is packed full of grease? I didn't add any to mine..
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Old 06-18-2018, 09:01 PM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by cgseanp View Post
yes, but it looks like your grease cap is packed full of grease? I didn't add any to mine..
If the cap is installed w/o grease, the void gives the grease you so diligently packed into the bearings a very convenient place to migrate into.😢

Bob
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Old 06-18-2018, 09:31 PM   #5
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I believe my manual specifically said it was not necessary to put grease in the cap, BUT I’m interested to see if anyone else packs grease into their grease cap?
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Old 06-18-2018, 10:30 PM   #6
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I lightly coat the inside of the cap so rust does not form on the inside of the steel cap. Otherwise grease in the inside of the cap is not needed. Same for the inside of the hub. Coat the inside of the hub so rust does not form.

All of the grease that will get into and stay in the wheel bearing is there becase you packed it in there. All other grease has zero benefit to the bearings.

>>>>>>>>>>>Action
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Old 06-19-2018, 10:06 AM   #7
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There are no moving parts inside the cap. Just a waste of grease. IMHO
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Old 06-19-2018, 10:08 AM   #8
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My Recommendation..👍

Quote:
Originally Posted by cgseanp View Post
I believe my manual specifically said it was not necessary to put grease in the cap, BUT I’m interested to see if anyone else packs grease into their grease cap?
Quote:
Originally Posted by Action View Post
I lightly coat the inside of the cap so rust does not form on the inside of the steel cap. Otherwise grease in the inside of the cap is not needed. Same for the inside of the hub. Coat the inside of the hub so rust does not form.

All of the grease that will get into and stay in the wheel bearing is there becase you packed it in there. All other grease has zero benefit to the bearings.

>>>>>>>>>>>Action
Get the facts before you type. 😂😂

Water causes rust, water does not like grease...why give water room to rust? Fill the cap with grease it costs very little.😎


Bob
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Old 06-19-2018, 12:52 PM   #9
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Bob, I don't know about you, however I use good wheel bearing grease not an oil or a semiliquid grease for my wheel bearings.

One of the properties of grease is that it does NOT become liquid or flow until a very high temperature. Basically it stays put at the location that you applied the grease. (There are other properties as well.) This property and others are measured in labs and are tightly controlled in the manufacturing process. One measurement is dropping point. The point at which enough heat is applied to a grease such that it flows or becomes liquid. Just so you know what that is here is a link to an engineering site for the definition of dropping point. https://www.engineersedge.com/lubric...int_grease.htm (Just a quick fact for you)

All of the wheel bearing grease that I use has a dropping point in excess of 180 degrees C. Or greater than 350 f. I hope to shout that my wheel bearings never see 200 f much less 300 f. (May be yours do I don't know) So if wheel bearing grease is not liquid, how can it possibly flow into or out of anywhere? Fact is grease in the hub just stays in the hub. Since the hub is spinning, grease in that area has an added obstacle of centrifugal force to over come. And grease coated grease cap just stays on the inside of the grease cap because it is .... well .... grease and doesn't flow like oil.

Now I do get facts, I just tend not to get my facts that are important from a blog site on "How stuff works" that might tell me how a garbage disposal works in addition to how to dispose of hazardous waste. I usually rely on facts from product manufactures, or in this case a chemical company that manufactures grease world wide.

http://www.valvolineeurope.com/english/pi_sheets

As to your statement about water. Water or moisture does cause rust. And grease, I think you will admit, is a good barrier in preventing rust. However more grease doesn't prevent better. Grease is grease and sticks to metal as it was designed that way on purpose! In my statement above I said to lightly coat the inside of the grease cap and the inside of the wheel hub to prevent rust. So if the inside of the wheel hub and the inside of the grease cap have a coating of grease, and grease doesn't isn't a liquid until a temperature that far exceeds normal operating of a wheel bearing, how is moisture going to get past the grease to the metal?

While stuffing the inside of the grease cap really only creates a mess and wastes some grease. With a remote possibility of the grease expanding a little and pushing the cap off. There isn't much other down side. If one wants to stuff the grease caps or the hub, knock your socks off. I don't recommend it and I have decades of repacking wheel bearings on hundreds of cars and light trucks in the 60s, 70s and 80s. In addition I worked for a major car manufacture on the service side of the business out in the dealer network. Oh and that is a fact too however you are going to have to take my word on that.

>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
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Old 06-19-2018, 01:11 PM   #10
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Along with being a waste of perfectly good grease there is a downside to too using too much when assembling the hub. As heat is generated and some of the grease is spun around it might get passed the seal and onto your brake shoes. Now that becomes not only a problem with reducing braking but also a mess to clean up. It will likely also find it's way past the outter cover and get spun around your wheels. While if it's limited to that it's still a mess that need to be cleaned up. Experience shows us where the line between TOO MUCH and JUST ENOUGH is.

Now, I see a second potential problem with your installation. The bearings run in a machined race that is pressed into a machined recess in the hub. Personally if I'm installing new bearings I would remove the old race and press in a new one matched to the new bearings. This is not difficult and adds slightly to the cost and time for the job. But, now this is my opinion, the job is not complete without this step.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it. Do it once, do it right and it will last a looooong time.
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Old 06-19-2018, 02:10 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by polarlyse View Post
Along with being a waste of perfectly good grease there is a downside to too using too much when assembling the hub. As heat is generated and some of the grease is spun around it might get passed the seal and onto your brake shoes. Now that becomes not only a problem with reducing braking but also a mess to clean up. It will likely also find it's way past the outter cover and get spun around your wheels. While if it's limited to that it's still a mess that need to be cleaned up. Experience shows us where the line between TOO MUCH and JUST ENOUGH is.

Now, I see a second potential problem with your installation. The bearings run in a machined race that is pressed into a machined recess in the hub. Personally if I'm installing new bearings I would remove the old race and press in a new one matched to the new bearings. This is not difficult and adds slightly to the cost and time for the job. But, now this is my opinion, the job is not complete without this step.

That's my story and I'm sticking to it. Do it once, do it right and it will last a looooong time.
So what’s the first potential problem?
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Old 06-19-2018, 02:14 PM   #12
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Excess grease bypassiing the seal onto the brakes was the first.
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Old 06-19-2018, 02:28 PM   #13
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Not sure how important it really is - but I have always understood that best practice when changing a bearing is also to install new outer races as well - they are just pressed into place.

That has always been what I have done whenever changing bearings.

Actually it has been a rare occasion for me to change a bearing race - only did it once on a previously owned trailer that I bought used when I found evidence that the grease was hard and the rollers were beginning to spall bits of metal off! No choice but to change them all - and I did!

Brian.
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Old 06-19-2018, 02:34 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Action View Post
Bob, I don't know about you, however I use good wheel bearing grease not an oil or a semiliquid grease for my wheel bearings.

One of the properties of grease is that it does NOT become liquid or flow until a very high temperature. Basically it stays put at the location that you applied the grease. (There are other properties as well.) This property and others are measured in labs and are tightly controlled in the manufacturing process. One measurement is dropping point. The point at which enough heat is applied to a grease such that it flows or becomes liquid. Just so you know what that is here is a link to an engineering site for the definition of dropping point. https://www.engineersedge.com/lubric...int_grease.htm (Just a quick fact for you)

All of the wheel bearing grease that I use has a dropping point in excess of 180 degrees C. Or greater than 350 f. I hope to shout that my wheel bearings never see 200 f much less 300 f. (May be yours do I don't know) So if wheel bearing grease is not liquid, how can it possibly flow into or out of anywhere? Fact is grease in the hub just stays in the hub. Since the hub is spinning, grease in that area has an added obstacle of centrifugal force to over come. And grease coated grease cap just stays on the inside of the grease cap because it is .... well .... grease and doesn't flow like oil.

Now I do get facts, I just tend not to get my facts that are important from a blog site on "How stuff works" that might tell me how a garbage disposal works in addition to how to dispose of hazardous waste. I usually rely on facts from product manufactures, or in this case a chemical company that manufactures grease world wide.

http://www.valvolineeurope.com/english/pi_sheets

As to your statement about water. Water or moisture does cause rust. And grease, I think you will admit, is a good barrier in preventing rust. However more grease doesn't prevent better. Grease is grease and sticks to metal as it was designed that way on purpose! In my statement above I said to lightly coat the inside of the grease cap and the inside of the wheel hub to prevent rust. So if the inside of the wheel hub and the inside of the grease cap have a coating of grease, and grease doesn't isn't a liquid until a temperature that far exceeds normal operating of a wheel bearing, how is moisture going to get past the grease to the metal?

While stuffing the inside of the grease cap really only creates a mess and wastes some grease. With a remote possibility of the grease expanding a little and pushing the cap off. There isn't much other down side. If one wants to stuff the grease caps or the hub, knock your socks off. I don't recommend it and I have decades of repacking wheel bearings on hundreds of cars and light trucks in the 60s, 70s and 80s. In addition I worked for a major car manufacture on the service side of the business out in the dealer network. Oh and that is a fact too however you are going to have to take my word on that.

>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
Sorry modude, nothing personal, I'm sure your much more smarter than me.😂

Do whatever tickles your fancy...and I will follow my own learning.
Import & GM Auto mechanic 28yrs, Service Mgr for 8, but what do I know, I'm new here.🤓

Bob
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“Education is what people do to you,
Learning is what you do to yourself…..”
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