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Old 05-28-2016, 04:50 PM   #1
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How often should wheel bearings be repacked

How often should wheel bearings be repacked?

Thx!
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Old 05-28-2016, 05:11 PM   #2
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Since you didn't indicate the year of the trailer ....... I believe Airstream recommends annually on a trailer that sees frequent use. This may have changed on newer trailers.

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Old 05-28-2016, 05:31 PM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Action View Post
Since you didn't indicate the year of the trailer ....... I believe Airstream recommends annually on a trailer that sees frequent use. This may have changed on newer trailers.

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Sorry for not posting complete information. It is a 2009 25fb Int. I bought it used last year. Not sure when they were last repacked so i'm assuming it would be wise to do it before any long trips.
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Old 05-28-2016, 05:44 PM   #4
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Very generally, every two years should suffice, depending on use, though Airstream also recommends a 15,000 mile interval as well as annually, should you tow more than that in a year.

Most normal use would be in the 2,000-5,000 mile per year range. The annual recommendation is to deal with moisture potentially sitting in the bearing assemblies from not being used, and causing rust on the bearing and race surfaces.
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Old 05-28-2016, 06:08 PM   #5
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Since you bought it without know the last time it was done, do it now and start the clock. It's not a big deal to do or have done.
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Old 05-28-2016, 06:44 PM   #6
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If you do enough reading here you'll find the answer to this but beginning with some of the more recently manufactured units, not sure if that would include 2009, some come with a never-lube sealed wheel bearing. The only way you'll know would be to pull the wheel/ drums off and inspect. Now, that's a smart thing to do in any case anyway so go ahead pull them to check and at the same time inspect your brakes and determine if you have self-adjusting or manual brakes.
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Old 05-28-2016, 09:23 PM   #7
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The owner's manual would be a good source.

And when I buy a used vehicle (which is more frequent than my wife likes) I change all of the fluids, filters and maintainence items. As stated above to start the clock.

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Old 06-19-2016, 09:40 AM   #8
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Thanks for everyone's input on my question about frequency of repacking the wheel bearings.

I decided since I didn't know when they were most recently repacked it would be prudent to do so at this point. I had it done when I had new tires installed. So the "clock" is now running!

Again thanks!
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Old 06-19-2016, 10:30 AM   #9
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I think that if one is at all handy, it is worth doing your own repacks. Not at all difficult and doesn't require much in the way of tools and equipt that you probably don't already have.

I think it is beneficial in terms of knowing your trailer better in case of emergencies and also being confidant that the work has been done properly - plus you save $$ ! Also a good chance to check the brakes.

I have had bad experience years ago with RV dealers when it comes to bearing repacks. I'm sure there are many excellent shops - just seems not the ones I have dealt with!

I'm pretty sure that the manual specifies annual repacks and I have mostly done that, but in reality based on what I have seen with the use I make of our trailer, maybe 5000 miles a year, every two years is fine - sometimes I have done that and still found everything fine and probably fit as is for more years service.

I do carry spare inner and outer bearings and seals with me in the trailer in case an emergency repair is needed. In that event, I think that even if I elected not to do the repair myself by the side of the road, I felt it would be wise to have all the parts needed in the correct sizes.

If you change a bearing assembly, best practice is to change the roller assembly together with both inner and outer races. Changing the outer race which is a press fit into the hub would be a bit more problematic without access to the proper tools and difficult to do by the side of the road! No doubt some rv'ers travel equipped for that, but I don't!

Brian.
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Old 06-19-2016, 11:14 AM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Wingeezer View Post
I think that if one is at all handy, it is worth doing your own repacks. Not at all difficult and doesn't require much in the way of tools and equipt that you probably don't already have.

I think it is beneficial in terms of knowing your trailer better in case of emergencies and also being confidant that the work has been done properly - plus you save $$ ! Also a good chance to check the brakes.

I have had bad experience years ago with RV dealers when it comes to bearing repacks. I'm sure there are many excellent shops - just seems not the ones I have dealt with!

I'm pretty sure that the manual specifies annual repacks and I have mostly done that, but in reality based on what I have seen with the use I make of our trailer, maybe 5000 miles a year, every two years is fine - sometimes I have done that and still found everything fine and probably fit as is for more years service.

I do carry spare inner and outer bearings and seals with me in the trailer in case an emergency repair is needed. In that event, I think that even if I elected not to do the repair myself by the side of the road, I felt it would be wise to have all the parts needed in the correct sizes.

If you change a bearing assembly, best practice is to change the roller assembly together with both inner and outer races. Changing the outer race which is a press fit into the hub would be a bit more problematic without access to the proper tools and difficult to do by the side of the road! No doubt some rv'ers travel equipped for that, but I don't!

Brian.
It was my original plan to do the repack myself but several situations came up that made it impractical at the time. I do know what you mean about doing it yourself as opposed to having a shop do. No body seems to care as much as you do.

Many years ago I had a bearing seize up on the front wheel of my car as we were crossing southern CO, in the middle of no where of course. It actually welded itself to the spindle. What a mess. So carrying an extra set of bearings might have merit. I'm going to think about doing this.

Thanks for the suggestions.
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