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Old 06-08-2016, 02:57 PM   #1
2 Rivet Member
 
1972 31' Sovereign
Kerrville , Texas
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 38
Going to pick up the 'New' Trailer

1972 31ft
260 Miles Away
Moved only 1x in the past 16 years

Questions;
Grease Seal
1.) Anybody know what size grease seals came stock on this? Or any info that would allow me to deduce a parts number or something? Would like to have 4x in hand when I arrive to save a trip to the parts store because it's going to be a very long day as-is.

Spare Tire
2.) 225/75r/15, 6 lug configuration. Did they all come stock with 5.5 bolt circle?
I'm looking at a tire+wheel combo at tractor supply for $140 seems like not a terrible deal just wanna make sure it's the right size

Brakes;
3.) I have a veteran mechanic & towmaster person going with me but he's a newbie to airstreams. Is there anything in unique about the airstreams brake systems he'll want to know prior to going?
-he believes the electric brakes & blinkers etc are powered by the hookup to the tow vehicle. I may be mistaken but I thought I had read somewhere that they were actually powered by the onboard battery? The trailer currently has no battery. Do I need to bring one with me?

Info appreciated. Thanks fellas,
M
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Old 06-08-2016, 03:44 PM   #2
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1973 21' Globetrotter
Houston , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,199
If the trailer has only been moved once in 16 years, then count on your tires being shot, regardless how much tread is on them. I bought tires and rims at Northern tool and they bolted right onto my '73--the 5.5 bolt pattern sounds right. Alternatively, you could pull all the wheels off and take the rims down to Discount Tire and get some new rubber put on them. The original rims might be so rusty that they won't hold a seal, though, especially if the tires are flat and the rims have been in contact with the dirt.

The original wiring of the trailer's signal lights and brakes is not compatible with modern standards. So step 1 will be to figure out if the plug has already been reconfigured to modern standards, or whether you will have to figure it out. Alternatively, bring along some temporary brake/signal lights with a long enough wire to get to the back of the trailer, and just skip the trailer's built in lights. In order to control the trailer's brakes, not only will the wiring all have to be compatible, but you will need a brake controller installed in your tow vehicle. When you step on the brakes, the trailer's brakes will be activated by electrical current from the tow vehicle. If the trailer disconnects from the tow vehicle and the break-away switch is activated, then the brakes will be powered by the trailer's house battery.

Also make sure you know what size ball you need on your hitch. Verify that all windows and hatches are secured--tape thems shut if there is any doubt.

good luck!
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Old 06-10-2016, 10:06 AM   #3
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1972 31' Sovereign
Kerrville , Texas
Join Date: May 2016
Posts: 38
Thanks! Any other tips?
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Old 06-11-2016, 10:08 AM   #4
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1973 21' Globetrotter
Houston , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,199
That should get you going. You might also want to be sure to check for any loose belly pan sections.

When I towed my trailer home, (I was extremely green and naive) I was pulling it around 300 miles. It was a single axle, so I brought two brand new tires on rims. The original rims were so rusty that they probably could not have had a tire mounted on them, so this was good planning. I didn't bring a spare, so had I had a problem with my two wheels, I would have been in a bind. It didn't occur to me to check the tire pressure in the tires once they werre installed, and I had driven several miles down the road before someone waved me down to tell me my trailer wheels looked really low. Sure enough, they tires had air in them, but only about 20 or 30 lbs.

I brought along the temporary tow lights, which again was pretty good planning, since my tow vehicle at the time only had a flat 4 wire connection, and the trailer turned out to have the original wiring configuration. The length of wire going to the temp lights was too short, but I was able to borrow another 6 ft. length or so to make the connection. My temp lights were also probably the cheapest ones available, and were very dim once installed--practically useless. The PO provided a 2 5/16 hitch with ball, but no weight distribution bars, so I was free-balling all the way home. The soft rear suspension of my mid-sized SUV bottomed out everytime we hit a bump in the road.

I should have had a temporary license plate on the trailer to make it a legal tow, but it hadn't even crossed my mind until I went to get on the road. My purchase was made more complicated by buying in Florida. Anyway, I made it home safely, but probably exhausted all of my good luck and charma in the process.

good luck!
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Old 06-11-2016, 02:07 PM   #5
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1964 26' Overlander
Rancho Palos Verdes , California
Join Date: Nov 2015
Posts: 50
Before towing our New to Us '64 Overlander home (1000 miles) we were told by a friend who transports stuff across the country for a living that the highway patrol REALLY doesn't like it if you have a license plate on a trailer that clearly doesn't belong to that trailer. That immediately raises suspicion of a stolen trailer.

He says you're better off with no license plate, but make sure you have the bill of sale in easy reach. Two long days on the road and we didn't get pulled over.

We also used temporary brake/signal lights because we didn't want to lose time on a quick turn around dinking with the wiring.
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Old 06-12-2016, 10:24 AM   #6
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1966 24' Tradewind
1995 34' Excella
Lynchburg , Virginia
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 2,470
Normally brakes will be powered by the umbilical cord, but a trailer battery is needed to power the brakes if the trailer gets disconnected from the tv. Also install a new emergency braking switch. It is just a few $.

Good luck, Dan
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