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Old 03-20-2013, 10:57 PM   #435
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I think that 80 PSI is quite a bit high. Take a look at the pressure chart that Michelin provides for RV tire use found here Michelin North America RV Load & Inflation Tables.

The chart states that you should weigh each end of the axle and use the higher of the two weights for the recommended tire inflation pressure for that axle. Let's say that you have 225/75R16 Load Range E tires with a two axle trailer that weighs 7,200 pounds. Let's just be a little conservative and say that all of the 7,200 pounds is carried by the trailer axles, none by the tow vehicle. OK, to make this example straightforward, we'll assume that the weight is equally distributed on all four wheels or 1,800 pounds per wheel. According to the chart, we should inflate the tires to between 45 and 50 PSI, cold (Single Wheel on each end of the axle). So, 80 PSI is too much and will give the trailer a rougher ride plus over time the center of the tread will wear more than the outsides due to this over-inflation.

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Old 03-21-2013, 04:05 AM   #436
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I average around 70 psi, never less than 65-68, never higher than 75. After 10k, not much appreciable wear, and a smooth ride.

Point of order though, I do keep my spare at max pressure (80 psi), as it is ALWAYS easier to remove air on the side of the road to match the other three tires than to add it. Gives me a margin with which I'm comfortable.
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Old 03-21-2013, 04:23 AM   #437
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My Chicom tires call for 80lbs and that is what I have been running. I have about 5500 miles on them with no visible wear. When I changed to the 5200 lb axles I measured tread depth with a caliper with depth probe and the wear between the front and rear tires is about .015 to .025 difference but then again the bottom of the grooves don't have a flat spot for the probe to contact. Visually I can detect no difference.

Over the winter she has been parked on 2X10 boards under a shed with tires completely covered. It won't be long before we take a short trip of a couple hundred miles for the upcoming season.
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Old 03-21-2013, 07:21 AM   #438
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Excessive tire pressure just adds to the pounding of the trailer.

Just imagine fork lift tires.

At 80 PSI, those tires certainly DO NOT provide a soft ride for the trailer, that must be offered, OR ELSE.

There is far more to consider beside tire wear.

Andy
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Old 03-21-2013, 07:43 AM   #439
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Thanks all for the variety of replies. I'll probably keep them at 70-72 on our 2007 27FB with the 16" LTX tires.
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:23 AM   #440
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Excessive tire pressure just adds to the pounding of the trailer.

Just imagine fork lift tires.

At 80 PSI, those tires certainly DO NOT provide a soft ride for the trailer, that must be offered, OR ELSE.

There is far more to consider beside tire wear.

Andy
Hi Andy, any recommendations on how to determine tire pressure that won't beat the trailer to pieces nor lead to tire failures? I have a new 28 International being built nest month with the 16" wheel/Michelin tire package. I'm sure the sticker from the factory will say 80PSI like others have reported. At 80, it can't be a smooth ride.
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:50 AM   #441
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Hi Andy, any recommendations on how to determine tire pressure that won't beat the trailer to pieces nor lead to tire failures? I have a new 28 International being built nest month with the 16" wheel/Michelin tire package. I'm sure the sticker from the factory will say 80PSI like others have reported. At 80, it can't be a smooth ride.
80 PSI for "E" tires????

Lets all strive to beat up the trailers, quickly.

That is fantastic for repair shops.

The tire pressure to use, to me, is a function of the load.

80 PSI is the maximum for "E" tires as well as for the steel wheels.

What will happen when hot weather is here, and that tire pressure increases?

A "maximum" rating doesn't mean that 's what should be used. Maximum means "don't exceed".

My opinion for "E" tires, is to use no more than 70 PSI. If that's not enough to carry the pay load, then perhaps the pay load should be decreased, but always maintain 'full" water.

The other interesting thing of late is "lets use "E" tires at 80 PSI".

But, do those folks typically have the running gear balanced or install Centramatics?

Heck no, that's a waste of money.

WOW!!!

Guess it all depends on personal choice, once again.

Andy
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Old 03-21-2013, 10:14 AM   #442
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16" tires?

Andy ; I have been watching this page on tires all winter and I'm still not convinced E rated tires are necessary but hearing all the failures of GYM's has me wondering what to do . I have a 1985 29' Sovereign and my GYM's are 4 yrs old . I can't find a 15" st tire US made from any tire mfg. I always keep my tires covered when in storage and they still look good but I don't trust them because of their age . I live in Ohio so we don't travel in the winter but I want to replace them this spring . I have herd some use a XL or extra load tire but I'm not convinced that is the way to go either . i do have centramatics that I purchased from you last year . I too don't want to shake my trailer apart with 80lb. psi but the cost between 15" and 16" is about the same if I buy new wheels . What would you do if you were me ? I value your opinion very much . Les Grace
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Old 03-21-2013, 01:15 PM   #443
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Andy ; I have been watching this page on tires all winter and I'm still not convinced E rated tires are necessary but hearing all the failures of GYM's has me wondering what to do . I have a 1985 29' Sovereign and my GYM's are 4 yrs old . I can't find a 15" st tire US made from any tire mfg. I always keep my tires covered when in storage and they still look good but I don't trust them because of their age . I live in Ohio so we don't travel in the winter but I want to replace them this spring . I have herd some use a XL or extra load tire but I'm not convinced that is the way to go either . i do have centramatics that I purchased from you last year . I too don't want to shake my trailer apart with 80lb. psi but the cost between 15" and 16" is about the same if I buy new wheels . What would you do if you were me ? I value your opinion very much . Les Grace
You didn't ask for my opinion, but here it is anyway:

First, is I don't think the issue of the additional inflation pressure is as big a difference as people make it out to be - in particular the difference between breaking and not breaking stuff in or attached to the trailer.

Second, If you have an ST225/75R15 Load Range D, then you have to be aware that a P235/75R15 XL has 555# less load carrying capacity (per tire). This might be an issue, so this has to be done very carefully.

Third, I'm a fan of going larger when it comes to trailers and tires. I like the idea of going from an ST225/75R15 Load Range D to an LT225/75R16 Load Range D (or E, but at 65 psi.), but the clearance has to be checked.

So without any additional info, I would advise you to go for the 16" option.
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Old 03-21-2013, 02:10 PM   #444
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Originally Posted by CapriRacer View Post

You didn't ask for my opinion, but here it is anyway:

First, is I don't think the issue of the additional inflation pressure is as big a difference as people make it out to be - in particular the difference between breaking and not breaking stuff in or attached to the trailer.

Second, If you have an ST225/75R15 Load Range D, then you have to be aware that a P235/75R15 XL has 555# less load carrying capacity (per tire). This might be an issue, so this has to be done very carefully.

Third, I'm a fan of going larger when it comes to trailers and tires. I like the idea of going from an ST225/75R15 Load Range D to an LT225/75R16 Load Range D (or E, but at 65 psi.), but the clearance has to be checked.

So without any additional info, I would advise you to go for the 16" option.
The dangers of under inflation are much greater than over. The reality is that most folks don't have individual wheel weights much less axle weights. I was fortunate to have the opportunity to weigh my Safari in 2001 so I know what my average food and camping gear weighs. The other side of the equation is the fact that we are using LT tires in a tandem axle arrangements. Not the same as a typical truck arrangement.

With all this in mind no one really takes this type of use into account in inflation tables. As long as my wheels are rated correctly, carrying 80 psi on my heavy slide out Classic leaves me a lot more room for margin. I'd rather not be so exact that a cool day, an altitude change, or a bad estimation on load leave me in an under inflation state.

Jack
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Old 03-21-2013, 03:05 PM   #445
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We have 16-inch wheels and Michelin XPS Ribs (225/75x16). Wheels and tires are balanced, and we have Centramatics. We run 80 psi, the maximum printed on the sidewalls.

I have ridden in our single-axle, 19-foot Bambi; and the ride is similar to our 2008 Tundra CrewMax on smooth roads at highway speeds, and a little more boat-like over irregular surfaces. However, the ride is not jarring, and it is not significantly different at 65 and 72 psi.

Also, I will not consider running lower pressures on our single axle Airstream in southwest desert areas; although, I might consider it, if we had multiple axles and lower tire loads with the same tires.
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Old 03-21-2013, 08:55 PM   #446
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When we ran 68 lbs. in Michelin LR E 16" tires, the tread wear showed them slightly underinflated—that is wear was slightly greater towards the sides and slightly less at the center. Since we went to 72 lbs., wear has been even.

The tables are great to make an initial decision, but in the end the tires will tell you what they like.

Gene
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:06 PM   #447
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Do the centramatics for 15" wheels work on the 16" wheels? I didn't see them for 16".
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Old 03-21-2013, 09:11 PM   #448
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Do the centramatics for 15" wheels work on the 16" wheels? I didn't see them for 16".
I have them on our trailer with 16" wheels/tires, but how would you know if they are really doing anything?
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