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Old 07-11-2003, 08:33 AM   #1
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Weight Distribution Question

I have a 1998 Bambi 19' with a tongue weight
of 500 lb. I would like to know what model EAZ Lift Weight Distribution Hitch you would recommend, the 750 max or 1000 max weight allowed?
I don't usually have that much weight in the back of the vehicle but know that has to be taken into concederation.

Thanks for any help on this matter, Randy
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Old 07-11-2003, 09:01 AM   #2
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I find that even without any weight distribution device it tows perfect.
I wonder if these devices are needed.
Airlifts or Firestone bags compensate hitch weight with more versatility
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Old 07-11-2003, 09:25 AM   #3
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Hitch

The lighter bars should be more than adequate. Using too heavy a bar tends to beat up the trailer and worsen the ride of the tow vehicle. As a side benefit, the lighter bars are a lot lighter to put on and off.

I use 550# bars on my International because I already had them. The tongue weight is over 600#, but with a Z71 pickup, the truck barely moves under the hitch load. The ride is excellent.
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Old 07-11-2003, 09:35 AM   #4
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for any hitch load that changes the attitude of the tow vehicle (raises the front and/or lowers the rear more than an inch or so), a weight distributing hitch is a good idea. At the very least you don't want your headlights bothering people!

Sway control is another issue. Always a good idea but usually not needed for the under 20' trailers.
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Old 07-11-2003, 11:00 AM   #5
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The rating of the hitch that is use, must also take into consideration what tow vehicle is used.

To not do so is guess work.

To use air shocks or air bags, or overload springs, to level the rear of the tow vehicle, when towing, is an accident that "WILL" happen.

Years of research by Caravanner Insurance Company, more than proved that fact.

There will always be the person who won't listen, or chooses to ignor facts, but if and when they lose control and hurt someone, they will become accutely aware of what liability insurance is for.
It's to cover their negligence and mistakes.

The question becomes more so, of how do you cultivate someone who has little or no regard for safety for themselves, their families, and the public at large.

ANY guardhouse lawyer, will mop the court room floor with anyone that has chosen to ignore towing safety rules.

Towing without a load equalizing hitch and/or a sway control, places that individuals neck, in a huge noose.

Talk to anyone, that has lost control and they will make a believer out of that person, PRONTO.

Or, settle with the estate of the driver, WHO THOUGHT, he was immune to the rules of safety, AND PHYSICS, as I did. That order of work, was far from heart warming.


Andy
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Old 07-11-2003, 11:04 AM   #6
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hey Andy,
I remember you commenting about the air-bags before, and I was wondering what you think of the new VW suv that was discussed in another recent thread. Apparently, it has an "air adjustable suspension" of some sort "stock" from the factory. Do you think that's a bad thing? or is it entirely different than adding after-market air bags?
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Old 07-11-2003, 11:10 AM   #7
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Any system that can remove weight from the "load equalizing hitch," progressively defeats the purpose of the hitch.

Any truck scale will prove that.



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Old 07-11-2003, 11:39 AM   #8
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Andy,

If I understand you correctly, you are saying that a load leveling hitch with sway control of any type is a liability management device as well as whatever other purpose it may serve. Makes sense.

This gets me to thinking about legal requirements - I know they exist for chains and brakes but I haven't seen any for load leveling or sway control. And this gets me to wondering how a law would specify these things. - also curious as to how a lawsuit would go about establishing that the lack of such devices for a hitch functioning within ratings would argue the case.

Also, do you know of any insurance company that provides incentive for particular hitch setups?

I am prompted with this curiosity by some of the discussions about Hensley, Pullrite, and other hitch types and the preponderance of simple hitches on the road.

Anyway, jsut curious,. Would appreciate your (and anyone elses for that matter) thoughts if you feel it worthwhile to help my curiosity itch.
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Old 07-11-2003, 12:23 PM   #9
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Bryan.

It's a matter of "industry standards." It's also a matter that the laws of Physics are severly jeopardized when towing with less than acceptable rigging.

Any, repeat, any truck scale will more than adequately demonstrate what is correct and what is not correct rigging. A simple matter of weight and balances.

Further, any time you are on a public road you automatically imply, that you are doing so, safely. It doesn't take much to prove that towing without a load eqaulizing hitch, is unsafe.

I am not aware of any insurance company that offers credits for proper rigging.


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Old 07-11-2003, 09:00 PM   #10
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An interesting thread, as I am in the middle of trying to figure this thing about spring bars weight rating. I have just had installed a Reese W/D with a Dual Cam Sway Control. The load bars that came with the W/D are rated at 12,000 # & this is the unit that was installed by a local TT dealer on our 1500 Ram pickup. We are pulling a 2002 Bambi, which is rated at 4500#, so I am more than sure the WD set-up is fine, perhaps even somewhat overkill with the Dual Cam Sway Control. I am questioning the spring bars rating ( 12,000# ) & told the dealer as such. I feel spring bars rated at 800#would be better, for the TT & the ride. I am, however , not the expert, so I called Reese in this regards & was told by Reese, that the 12,000# bars would be o.k. for this application & that the 12,000# spring bars WOULD NOT transfer any shock damaging effect to the TT. Now, if I read Andy correct he is saying just the opposite. Is there a right or wrong with the spring bar ratings? What to do! What to do! Whatever ,but do it right.
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Old 07-11-2003, 11:50 PM   #11
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Trailers are pulled without these devices all over the world & these weight hitches only exist in the US & Canada.
You won't see one anywhere else, & their trailers can be as heavy as here.
When in England, I asked many "caravan" dealers who said they never heard of these hitches, they are also unknown all over Europe...no problems or safety issues exist, or the european parliament would have tackled the issue...they are very strict on safety matters.

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Old 07-12-2003, 07:23 AM   #12
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The "rule of thumb" to determine the rating of the torsion bars, is somewhat basic.

The heavier duty the tow vehicle, the lighter rating bars should be used.

When the bars are attached, the weight distribution on the tow vehicle should be near equal. That is to say, if you transfer 600 pounds to the tow vehicle, 150 pounds should be applied to each wheel, AND. at the same time the bars should bend at least one inch.

Therefore if the rating is too high, the bars will not bend enough, causing more road shock to the front of the trailer.

If the rating is too low, the bars will bend excessively.

Again, any truck scale will prove what combo is correct for any combination.

With regard to towing with just a ball, and using air lifts or air bags, perhaps people in other countries are not as law suit happy as we are in America.

Personal opinion has nothing to do with what "is correct."

The laws of physics does.

Personal opinion, however strong, does not and will not change the laws of physics.

Towing without a "load equalizing" hitch, demonstrates a lack of safety concerns, not only for themselves, but the innocent person as well.

In plain language, IT'S DUMB.


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Old 07-12-2003, 08:58 AM   #13
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For sure other countries are not as "law suit happy" but they are as "safety concerned", even more than you could imagine & if it was "dumb" they wouldn't do it...

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Old 07-12-2003, 09:20 AM   #14
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European trailers

Their trailers are much lighter than ours and have a very low tongue weight. The trailers I saw in the UK are usually wide opn inside.

I saw a guy lift the tongue onto the ball of what must have been a 16 to 18' caravan. How they avoid sway, I don't know except they usually don't pull very fast (I spent over an hour stuck in a line of traffic behind one in Scotland).

They are also usually pulling with independent rear suspension which aids in stability.
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