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Old 03-26-2013, 05:45 AM   #1611
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I believe that the best way to handle the sway problem with snow and ice is to not start the tow vehicle's engine. The second best way is to just plain slow down. I would rather be Mark O. that is late , than the late Mark O..
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Old 03-26-2013, 06:20 AM   #1612
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I'm still a little surprised about how defensive you all get about the Andersen. I simply asked if not being able to turn the anti-sway off was a concern and it morphs into criticism of Andy Thompson.

Forgetting individuals, if you're caught out in a situation where it's very wet or staring to get icy, is the fact that you can't alter the friction in the Andersen's anti-sway system a concern to you? Advice offered by the manufacturers of the traditional friction arm will recommend loosening the device in potentially slippery situations, what is the view of Andersen users given that there is no adjustment available. There is no criticism of the Andersen intended in asking this question, I'm just interested to know what current users think.
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:33 AM   #1613
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It seems common place on this forum for commercial members to push the product they sell by using innuendo, and derogatory slurs toward other competing products.

The one in Southern California would lead you to believe the only weight distribution/anti sway hitch that does anything is the Reese Dual Cam.

I've learned to totally ignore all of these statements just like I ignore uninvited sales and political calls. (Caller ID is a wonderful thing.)
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Old 03-26-2013, 07:54 AM   #1614
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For me it was a toss up between Propride and Andersen. I get that the Pro pride is probably somewhat technically superior at sway prevention, but chose the Andersen due to its much lighter weight and cost. For the same cost as a Propride I'm also getting a killer solar system. Even if I have to change the coupler someday, its not that big a deal. I choose not to drive on ice so that's not an issue for me.
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:21 AM   #1615
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I've been trying to keep to the matter at hand, that is how do you users feel about the Andersen friction anti-sway when road conditions turn difficult. I really don't see how having a dig at commercial members and their interests has anything to with the subject. Indeed, I'd suggest that some of the comments made go well beyond the acceptable use policy of this forum i.e. be nice! I'm sure that pretty much everyone here is quite capable of picking out what is sales talk and what isn't, but to dismiss the opinions of commercial members as being just self-interest is entirely wrong.

So, you're hauling with your Andersen and the weather turns nasty. Are you concerned that the friction anti-sway is "on" all the time? Is it an issue or a non-issue?
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:29 AM   #1616
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Quote:
Originally Posted by MrUKToad View Post
I've been trying to keep to the matter at hand, that is how do you users feel about the Andersen friction anti-sway when road conditions turn difficult. I really don't see how having a dig at commercial members and their interests has anything to with the subject. Indeed, I'd suggest that some of the comments made go well beyond the acceptable use policy of this forum i.e. be nice! I'm sure that pretty much everyone here is quite capable of picking out what is sales talk and what isn't, but to dismiss the opinions of commercial members as being just self-interest is entirely wrong.

So, you're hauling with your Andersen and the weather turns nasty. Are you concerned that the friction anti-sway is "on" all the time? Is it an issue or a non-issue?
MrUKToad, Personally, I don't think there is enough experience with the Andersen on this forum at this time to answer the question about it's use on slippery roads.

And all the comments about statements from commercial users, are based on the fact that the exact same issues with sway control on such road surfaces would also apply to the Equalizer, the Reese, the ProPride, the Hensley, and any other anti-sway weight distribution hitch. The ONLY type would have the option of adjusting the anti-sway would be those that use the old friction bar, which most think is somewhat marginal in it's performance anyway, and certainly of almost ancient design.

And that fact of almost ancient design is what is most interesting....that Andy Thompson would resort to that hitch to slight the Andersen.
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Old 03-26-2013, 08:34 AM   #1617
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I was traveling through northern VA into WVa and Md last week when the weather turned sloppy with freezing rain and snow. Slush was accumulating mostly on the shoulders and cars were skidding off the roadway. Our plans had us reaching Hagerstown, Md and staying at a hotel. While our northbound side traffic continued to move the conditions called for a serious slowdown. At no time with my Anderson hitch did I feel any other control was needed. The simple slowdown kept me in full and relaxed control. We made our destination for the night and home the next day in clear, cold weather with dry roads.
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:04 AM   #1618
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Originally Posted by MrUKToad View Post
On the traditional friction arms you can loosen off the friction setting manually if you're driving in slick conditions. Using traditional friction anti-sway it is possible that any loss of contact between tire and road (caused by ice perhaps) could create a situation in a turn where you can't overcome the forces being applied by that anti-sway system, then you end up in a skid.
This presents a questions to me.

In over 40 years of towing I have never heard of the idea of loosen the tension on the WD bars while towing on slippery roads. I have to admit that may be a common practice up north where the need might present itself more often than in the lower half of the 48. What surprises me is the source. For one who went out of his way to suggest that the Andersen could not transfer enough weight to the front axle to maintain steering control he is now the source for saying you don't want that weight applied to the front axle, and thus a lose of steering control. Which is it?

While I most likely do not have the slippery road driving history of most Canadians have I have towed across Canada, with a Reese system, from Winnipeg and through Alberta in 3 days of continuing snow and high winds. I did not know about reducing the tension on the bars nor would I have considered doing it if I had. Steering control was my consideration and reduced speed was my method.

That would apply with what ever hitch i was using.
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:08 AM   #1619
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Originally Posted by HowieE View Post

This presents a questions to me.

In over 40 years of towing I have never heard of the idea of loosen the tension on the WD bars while towing on slippery roads. I have to admit that may be a common practice up north where the need might present itself more often than in the lower half of the 48. What surprises me is the source. For one who went out of his way to suggest that the Andersen could not transfer enough weight to the front axle to maintain steering control he is now the source for saying you don't want that weight applied to the front axle, and thus a lose of steering control. Which is it?

While I most likely do not have the slippery road driving history of most Canadians have I have towed across Canada, with a Reese system, from Winnipeg and through Alberta in 3 days of continuing snow and high winds. I did not know about reducing the tension on the bars nor would I have considered doing it if I had. Steering control was my consideration and reduced speed was my method.
Most, if not all, friction type sway controls state this in their manuals. I had (with my old SOB as well as my pop-up) never experienced the need to loosen it on wet roads....but snow???? I don't tow in snow anyway, but I could see the need.
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:20 AM   #1620
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I recently encountered icy, wet , slushy road with a stiff tail wind for some 90 miles. There were no issues with the Andersen hitch.
However I can't give Andersen all of the credit. Since I spent more than 30 years driving on icy mountain roads in Colorado, with and without a trailer or two in tow. None of which had a WD hitch.
In my case, if I would chose to reduce the amount of friction on the Andersen hitch. Since the FW tank is in the front of our coach. I could empty the tank or at least pump the water to the holding tanks in the back of the trailer.
With the Andersen hitch, because of the tapered socket for the hitch ball, the amount of friction is based on the tongue weight. Reduce the tongue weight, reduce the friction.
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Old 03-26-2013, 09:48 AM   #1621
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Way back in my instrumentation classes I recal that there were 2 components to Friction. Initial force to overcome the at rest state and the force to maintain motion. Without extensive experimentation my first reaction is this. The initial force to start movement while using a metal to metal device, especially a cam, is quite high while the continuing force is not that high. I envision the forces involved in the Andersen are much closer, with the initial force being less than metal to metal and the continuing force to being much more. This may account for the smoothness with which the Andersen is applied damping to sway. It may also mean that the initial force is already less than that of the traditional WD systems.

I can't quantify this but question this.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:02 AM   #1622
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Ignorance

Quote:
Originally Posted by MrUKToad View Post
I'm still a little surprised about how defensive you all get about the Andersen. I simply asked if not being able to turn the anti-sway off was a concern and it morphs into criticism of Andy Thompson.

Forgetting individuals, if you're caught out in a situation where it's very wet or staring to get icy, is the fact that you can't alter the friction in the Andersen's anti-sway system a concern to you? Advice offered by the manufacturers of the traditional friction arm will recommend loosening the device in potentially slippery situations, what is the view of Andersen users given that there is no adjustment available. There is no criticism of the Andersen intended in asking this question, I'm just interested to know what current users think.
Just to follow your logic....I would do likewise lessening the WD by lossening the tension on the Andersen hitch chains by adjusting the nuts. What's the difference from loosening the spring bars?
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:32 AM   #1623
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Just to follow your logic....I would do likewise lessening the WD by lossening the tension on the Andersen hitch chains by adjusting the nuts. What's the difference from loosening the spring bars?
In MrUKToad's defense, I think he and Andy are advocating loosening the tension on the friction anti-sway bar, not the tension on the WD bars.
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Old 03-26-2013, 11:33 AM   #1624
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To reduce tension or not to reduce tension that is the question. It all come back to which horse are they riding. Reducing the resistance to movement at the ball or reducing the weight on the front axle. Andy has criticized the Andersen from both sides and I them as opposites.

There may be an argument for reducing the resistance to movement at the ball but I doubt that trumps the need for weight on the front axle. The force needed to overcome friction is, F=UN, Force equals the Coefficient of Friction Times the Load. If there is one thing you do not want to do is to reduce the load on the steering axle while traveling on a slippery surface. That is basic physics that is independent of what ever you are using.
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