Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 12-03-2011, 09:11 AM   #15
Rivet Master
 
Ridgerunner3's Avatar
 
2002 25' Safari
Fountain Inn , South Carolina
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 659
Images: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwoodguy View Post
The first problem is getting the new A/S home. All these fancy hitches seem to only be sold mail order. So, I am not going to have a fancy hitch on my car by next Thursday when I go to get my trailer. Can I safely tow my rig home (300mi) without a fancy hitch?

Alternatively----if anyone here knows a shop in the Eugene, Or. area that sells these fancy hitches, I could drag my new rig over to a shop right after I pick it up, and get something installed?
Have you thought about contacting an online wd hitch dealer and have the hitch delivered to you by Wednesday. This should be no problem if you call today. Take the new hitch with you to pickup the new AS and have the dealer install the hitch you bring with you.

They should be just as capable of installing another brand of hitch as they are the Husky.

Just a thought.
__________________

__________________
Ridgerunner3 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 09:18 AM   #16
4 Rivet Member
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Eureka , California
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 321
dznf--
That picture is interesting. It makes me ask this with great concern: It looks like it would take tremendous muscle to get those chains pulled up and latched? Here's something I hadn't thought of - I have severe arthritis in both arms and would not be able to apply huge muscle to bend all these bars and whatnot. I never thought of this, but whatever hitch I get has to be somewhat easy to connect up. If it takes the equivelent of lifting 50 pounds, I can't do it.
__________________

__________________
redwoodguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 09:20 AM   #17
4 Rivet Member
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Eureka , California
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ridgerunner3 View Post
Have you thought about contacting an online wd hitch dealer and have the hitch delivered to you by Wednesday. This should be no problem if you call today. Take the new hitch with you to pickup the new AS and have the dealer install the hitch you bring with you.

They should be just as capable of installing another brand of hitch as they are the Husky.

Just a thought.
Could be possible. That's cutting it very tight. The freight will be VERY expensive for like 3-day. The ProPride is $195 shipping regularly. I bet it becomes $500 or more for a rush. I dunno. Plus, I would have to decide today with really very, very little confidence about what to buy.
__________________
redwoodguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 09:30 AM   #18
4 Rivet Member
 
Airline's Avatar
 
1972 29' Ambassador
grants pass , Oregon
Join Date: Jun 2011
Posts: 260
Images: 1
Blog Entries: 2
Hitch

Either have Sutton install and set up your hitch before you leave or have another hitch dealer in eugene do it before you pick up the trailer.No sales tax in oregon either.
__________________
1972 Ambassador Itn'l 29'.Custom Interior

1987 Avion 34X

1985 Avion 30R
Airline is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 09:39 AM   #19
Rivet Master
Airstream Dealer
 
Inland RV Center, In's Avatar
 
Corona , California
Join Date: Feb 2002
Posts: 16,499
Images: 1
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwoodguy View Post
dznf--
That picture is interesting. It makes me ask this with great concern: It looks like it would take tremendous muscle to get those chains pulled up and latched? Here's something I hadn't thought of - I have severe arthritis in both arms and would not be able to apply huge muscle to bend all these bars and whatnot. I never thought of this, but whatever hitch I get has to be somewhat easy to connect up. If it takes the equivelent of lifting 50 pounds, I can't do it.
It takes next to no effort to operate the snap-up brackets.

In fact, you can snap them in place with your hands and never need a extension pipe.

The trick is to drop the trailer coupler on the ball, lock the coupler, then with the electric jack, raise the front end of the trailer very high.

That then allows a person to simply operate the snap-up brackets with no effort.

Once the snap-up brackets have been secured, lower the front of the trailer.

Then observe the bend in the bars such as in the above photo.

Andy
__________________
Inland RV Center, In is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 09:50 AM   #20
4 Rivet Member
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Eureka , California
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 321
Andy,
WHEW! Ok, that makes sense to use the jack to do all the work. Thanks. I am breathing easier already!

And as per Airline - I am going to scour the Yellow Pages in Eugene now and see if I find a hitch specialist of some sort. However, it appears that all fancy hitches like Hensley, PullPro and the like, are sold direct and not through retail stores. Airfreight on a hundreds of pound of steel?----OUCH!
__________________
redwoodguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 10:14 AM   #21
Rivet Master
 
1975 29' Ambassador
Reno , Nevada
Join Date: May 2003
Posts: 1,351
Quote:
is everyone on the planet just taking wild guesses?
yes indeed, but the people with the guesses often believe they aren't guesses but gospel. That makes things interesting when trying to discuss what is going on.

As Andy noted, lifting the ball to set the spring bars is the way to go. Properly set spring bars should be easy to move into place after the ball is raised from 5 to 7 inches. Doing this is also a check that you have the coupler properly locked on the ball, too.

The thing with hitch type, load leveling system, and sway inhibiting technique is that it's a custom thing for you and your rig. That usually means an empirical approach with a bit of trial and error to find what suits best. Some go for the magic bullet approach figuring that more expensive means better but most find that the default works just fine.

Since the default is usually something like the Reese spring bar setup with a friction bar for sway, you know that there is a wide range of suitable. This is especially so in regards to sway as that friction bar technique is often more for show than effect (IMHO). The dual cam or the Lindon Equal-i-zer type sway control is a step up that suits many.

If you are looking at this issue, the first thing you need to pay attention to is your driving adjustments when towing. Keep the speed down. Be alert to what your rig is telling you. Avoid any sudden maneuvers. Maintain plenty of distance around you on the road. Make sure your tires are properly inflated and tow vehicle well maintained.

Start out using a checklist for hookup and make sure that everyone knows you are not to be interrupted when going through the list. That list should include the coupler check, safety chain attachment, emergency brake cable, umbilical, front jack, window lockdowns, awning tiedown, wheel chocks, stabilizing jacks and so on.

In Eugene, Sutton seems to be an established place for trailers. I'd be careful of advertising bragging about such things. I'd also be careful about thinking that somebody's got your solution for you as a magic bullet.
__________________
bryanl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 10:30 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
aftermath's Avatar
 
2006 25' Safari FB SE
Spokane , Washington
Join Date: Sep 2009
Posts: 1,133
Mr. Redwood,

Listen to RUMSHIP in his post. People get all worked up about hitches and if you listen to everyone you will really be in a tizzy.

I can't speak about self leveling TVs, HA or PP upscale hitches or anything other than an EQUALIZER brand hitch. I tow a 25 FB with my half ton PU and am using the 1K bars. The specs for the trailer say the tongue weight is 720 lbs but when you put two full propane tanks, two batteries on it, load the water tank and pack for your trip, you will be well over 800 pounds.

The Airstream dealer in town said that the 1K bars is what I needed. I have the trailer level and I didn't have to crank the hitch down to get there. The ride is fine and I am not popping rivets or shaking drawers open or anything like that.

I would guess that the most "popular" hitch out there would be the Reese followed by the Equalizer. They are both good and I like mine. It is easy to hitch and unhitch and was easy to setup and adjust. If you can run a socket wrench and read some directions, you can set it up on your own.

Just another opinion to muddy the waters. You can order an Equalizer from RV Wholesalers online and they can ship it to you. It might be worth your while to get a hitch and then go get the trailer. I am sure you have already been waiting for it, a few more weeks might pay off.

Good luck and..........don't worry too much.
__________________
aftermath is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 10:47 AM   #23
4 Rivet Member
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Eureka , California
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 321
The size of the bars then seems to be question of different ideas. Lighter bars would have more spring - more suspension. Heavier bars would be stiffer. Apparently either will level the TV. Is there a danger of breaking light bars? It's easy to see the advantage of the light bar. Not so easy to see the advantage of a heavy bar.

I do not have an unlimited budget. I actually almost feinted dead away when I found out the price of one of these hitches (my first new car cost a lot less!). My sort of reasonable, budget-minded, sensible, Timex-watch-wearing voice inside is saying that hitches in the $500 to a $1000 range will probably work for us. And I see lots and lots of people using them. So, I am leaning that way. I'd like to have some money left for gas!

I found what looks like a experienced hitch sales place in Eugene and have emailed him. I hope to talk with him later today and see what he has.
__________________
redwoodguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 11:25 AM   #24
Rivet Master
 
Silver Goose's Avatar
 
2008 27' Classic FB
Burkburnett , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwoodguy
... My A/S dealer is 7 hours away. He only sells the HuskyTow, so naturally that will be all he recommends.

I'd like to get a firm grip on the concepts. Weight distribution seems pretty clear - you want to divide the tongue weight between your rear and front axles on the TV. But apparently, if you do that with bars that are too stiff, you will make the hitch point so stiff (unforgiving) the road bumps will become so harsh it can damage your trailer? This would be like hitching your trailer to a truck with say no suspension, no give to it. Every tiny bump is transferred direct to trailer. "Shake the cloths off the cloths hangers" someone said. That makes sense. I guess then the idea is to transfer weight, but still have "suspension" left. Soften the ride. Makes sense.

Auto Level: I assume then that anything which raises the back end, adds stiffness to the ride? The stiffness is bad, right? But surely you don't want to tow with the back end dragging low, right?

I'm going to look more into some of the brands mentioned here which I hadn't heard of.
Profit often trumps the expertise we expect from many dealers. Presumably they know how to install and properly setup the model that they do sell, but there's no guarantee they do. It is also more profitable to stock one size. If the buyer is not knowledgeable he may end up with an "It'll do, one size fits all" solution that may not be satisfactory or even properly adjusted.

I think you have a good understanding of the weight distribution concept. Yes, the needs of a cushy sedan and an F350 are vastly different. Both will benefit from sway control but while the lightly sprung sedan may need stout WD to support a heavy trailer, the F350 needs little if any. The goal is to achieve a stable level tow vehicle. Many of the popular brands cite sway prevention or sway control as part of the weight distribution mechanism. For any to be effective they must be properly installed and adjusted.

A prior post shows a photo of a nicely matched Reese Dual Cam setup. The arc seen in the spring bars tells me he has adequate pressure on the cams to make the sway control effective and at the same time the bars have enough flex to absorb much of the bumps. My store bought hitch came with the all too standard 1200# bars. While the sway control was fine, all the cushions were shuffled and dealt in less than 100 miles! There was no arc in those bars. Reading the various threads here, I realized it was only a matter of time before I'd be rounding up loose screws and replacing sheared rivets. I can see how worse damage is possible. I switched to 800# bars for my 27FB, the cushions pretty much stay put and the ride up front is noticeably smoother.

As weighed my hitch weight is just over 900# but the CAT weights solo and then with the trailer loaded and hitched for travel show I'm shifting a total of 520# forward of the ball. If my trailer weighed less or the TV was sprung stiffer in the rear I would likely opt for the 600# bars in that case. Getting weighed is an excellent way to know exactly where you are and if you need to dial in the adjustments better.
__________________
AIR 47751
Air Safe Hitch, Reese Dual Cam 800#, Centramatics
Silver Goose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 11:55 AM   #25
Rivet Master
 
Silver Goose's Avatar
 
2008 27' Classic FB
Burkburnett , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by bryanl

yes indeed, but the people with the guesses often believe they aren't guesses but gospel. That makes things interesting when trying to discuss what is going on.

As Andy noted, lifting the ball to set the spring bars is the way to go. Properly set spring bars should be easy to move into place after the ball is raised from 5 to 7 inches. Doing this is also a check that you have the coupler properly locked on the ball, too.

The thing with hitch type, load leveling system, and sway inhibiting technique is that it's a custom thing for you and your rig. That usually means an empirical approach with a bit of trial and error to find what suits best. Some go for the magic bullet approach figuring that more expensive means better but most find that the default works just fine.

Since the default is usually something like the Reese spring bar setup with a friction bar for sway, you know that there is a wide range of suitable. This is especially so in regards to sway as that friction bar technique is often more for show than effect (IMHO). The dual cam or the Lindon Equal-i-zer type sway control is a step up that suits many.

If you are looking at this issue, the first thing you need to pay attention to is your driving adjustments when towing. Keep the speed down. Be alert to what your rig is telling you. Avoid any sudden maneuvers. Maintain plenty of distance around you on the road. Make sure your tires are properly inflated and tow vehicle well maintained.

Start out using a checklist for hookup and make sure that everyone knows you are not to be interrupted when going through the list. That list should include the coupler check, safety chain attachment, emergency brake cable, umbilical, front jack, window lockdowns, awning tiedown, wheel chocks, stabilizing jacks and so on.

In Eugene, Sutton seems to be an established place for trailers. I'd be careful of advertising bragging about such things. I'd also be careful about thinking that somebody's got your solution for you as a magic bullet.
Bryanl is giving very good advice. There's a reason pilots do a preflight. Even after 30 years of towing, I still run through my checklist before putting it in gear. You don't want to get to your destination and discover you forgot to hookup the breakaway switch... My wife takes a walk or chats with the neighbors when I hook up, she knows that is the time I shouldn't be distracted.

Yes, the tongue jack will lift the front end high enough to simply lift the bars into position and allow you to close and secure the latches effortlessly. There's no better way to insure the coupler is fully engaged either. Depending on the TV, it is possible to lift the rear wheels off the ground. Wheel chocks on first, off last. I've even changed a flat on the rear of my TV on the side of the road that way. With the wheels chocked it was a lot easier and seemed even more safe than the little bottle jack they pack with the spare.
__________________
AIR 47751
Air Safe Hitch, Reese Dual Cam 800#, Centramatics
Silver Goose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 12:21 PM   #26
Rivet Master
 
Silver Goose's Avatar
 
2008 27' Classic FB
Burkburnett , Texas
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 955
Quote:
Originally Posted by redwoodguy
Drilling Into the Frame
Ok, I see some hitches require drilling holes in the A-frame, and some don't. Obviously drilling holes in a box channel weakens it by SOME - even if small - amount. I am guessing not very much. (Not to mention rust points) But, do you guys drill holes in a hugely expensive Airstream frame? No big deal? Big deal? Toss up?
I'm not a fan of drilling holes in a frame either. The Reese (the only one I know about) requires (2) 7/16" holes on each side to mount the cam arm brackets. They are drilled on one wall only, not going through the other side and self threading bolts are installed and torqued to 50 ft-lbs so presumably any loss of strength is negligible. Rust is a valid concern but even hardware that clamps on nicks the coating so I haven't found it to be a problem that can't be controlled with something like RustOleum. My vote is - no big deal.
__________________
AIR 47751
Air Safe Hitch, Reese Dual Cam 800#, Centramatics
Silver Goose is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 01:56 PM   #27
4 Rivet Member
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Eureka , California
Join Date: Sep 2011
Posts: 321
Quote:
Originally Posted by Silver Goose View Post
so I haven't found it to be a problem that can't be controlled with something like RustOleum. My vote is - no big deal.
That's the kind of answer I was looking for - - thanks.

Update: My A/S dealer (Sutton) was listed on the Equalizer site as a dealer/installer. So apparently he DOES have more than one kind of hitch. Closed on Sat. so I dropped him an email to call me Monday with some choices for my TV/TT combo.
__________________
redwoodguy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-03-2011, 02:01 PM   #28
Rivet Master
 
dkottum's Avatar
 
2012 25' Flying Cloud
Battle Lake , Minnesota
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 7,716
Asking the group, what's wrong with the new(er) Husky Centerline hitch with 800# bars?

Advantages here: the dealer sells it, extremely simple setup, easy to readjust when/if needed, flexible trunnion bars, interesting sway control/return idea, no holes in frame.

I have the Equal-i-zer, like it's simplicity, dislike the stiffness of the bars. I like the design of this Husky better.

doug k
__________________

__________________
dkottum is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 03:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.