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Old 07-20-2015, 12:27 PM   #29
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I'm just going to get shorter chains. Mine are cruddy anyway - maybe get stainless steel this time.

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you might consider grade 70. Probably higher load limits than SS.
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Old 07-20-2015, 12:49 PM   #30
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I'm just going to get shorter chains. Mine are cruddy anyway - maybe get stainless steel this time.

Cheers,
John
While stainless steel offers great corrosion resistance, it typically is lower in strength due to the reduced carbon content. I would recommend a High Strength Grade 43, or Grade 70 Galvanized chain with appropriate connection hardware. These chain grades offer 5,400 lbs. and 6,600 lbs. MWL in a 3/8" chain size. Multiple this by two chains and you are in the 10,800 lb. to 13,200 lb. range which is more than sufficient for most applications.

BTW the breaking strength of these two grades is 16,200 lbs. and 19,800 lbs. respectively so there is a significant safety factor.
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Old 07-20-2015, 01:56 PM   #31
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you might consider grade 70. Probably higher load limits than SS.

Grade 70 is overkill, but it's better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it-
Grade 70 is for 80,000#.


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Old 07-20-2015, 11:39 PM   #32
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I went over to the local 'Hercules Wire Rope' dealer. They know how to 'rig' what you need.
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Old 07-21-2015, 11:41 PM   #33
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The idea is that the safety chains are just long enough so that when they are cris-crossed that do not bind when making a turn. The reason for cris-crossing the safety chains is to provide a saddle for the hitch head or trailer tounge if it were to become disconnected. I have seen some use coiled safety cables, but I'd think they are an "absolute no no" as the only purpose they provide is to hinder a completely runaway trailer.
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Old 07-22-2015, 10:34 AM   #34
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Stainless is not necessarily stronger. You need to look for at least grade 30 proof and I would not use less than 1/4 inch link (thickness) which is rated for 5200 lbs working load. Grade 30 proof is more wear resistant than stainless. If rust is an issue you can buy it in Galvanized Bright or Hot Dipped finish

I certainly agree that Grade 70 is better/best. Grade 40 or 43 is great if you can find it. The industry standard is Grade 30 which is generally available in Hardware stores in bulk lengths. Of course the higher the grade the smaller diameter you can use. I would be using chain rated to give me at least 10,000 lbs between two chains for my 7200 lb trailer, but even dragging I doubt the full trailer weight will ever be pulled, unless it digs in. Then you will probably rip the hitch off the truck. Hopefully your breakaway isn't also attached to the hitch.

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Old 07-22-2015, 12:15 PM   #35
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An FYI on the availability of grade 70, most "farm supply" stores ( tractor supply, orchelin, feldmans, etc ) carry it, sold by the foot, so you can simply buy what you need. And I actually found 20' lengths of it with hooks at Home Depot recently at a reasonable price.
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Old 07-22-2015, 01:33 PM   #36
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My thanks to all for this post. I have not been crossing my chains but will be doing it now. Thanks
If your chains are attached to your Airstream like out 2012 FC 25, there is no crossing of the chains. They are both attached to a single steel loop welded to the bottom of the tongue.
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Old 07-22-2015, 02:01 PM   #37
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Even though the chains come from the same loop, one chain is on the left and one is on the right. You can still cross and cradle, even though it is a very short length of chain crossed.
You are not saying that both chains come from one chain link, are you?
My trailer has 2 chains attached to the same loop.
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Old 07-22-2015, 02:10 PM   #38
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As I posted earlier crossed chains are mandatory most states, plus greater safety to support hitch if uncoupled, why take chance and maybe legal liability if not crossed, plus citations for not crossing. Google up states for crossing safety chains.
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Old 07-26-2015, 10:20 PM   #39
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I am switching to a new tow vehicle and while my safety chains were just about the right length with the old tow vehicle with the new F150 they are 5-6" too short. Just driving around the neighborhood today they were binding with a turn of less than 90 degrees. I will try to find a trailer dealer tomorrow to see what I can do (no farm equipment stores around here in the desert!) The end of the safety chains attached to the AS seem to have been welded on to a mounting point under the tongue on each side. Not sure exactly how I will get a new, longer chain attached there without some welding (outside my area of expertise). I could try to lengthen the other end with the hooks. Seems everyone else is having issues with LONG chains while ours are SHORT! Thanks for everyone's thoughts.
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Old 07-27-2015, 07:10 AM   #40
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If you can find clevis with screw in pin proper size simply hook length of chain needed, do not use hammer together loops as they will come apart. A clevis is u shaped with bolt that slips thru eye one side, threads into other eye
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Old 07-27-2015, 07:15 AM   #41
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If you can find clevis with screw in pin proper size simply hook length of chain needed, do not use hammer together loops as they will come apart. A clevis is u shaped with bolt that slips thru eye one side, threads into other eye

Also referred to as a shackle. I would use a properly rated safety Clevis/Shackle that utilizes a threaded bolt and cotter pin.
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Old 07-27-2015, 07:24 AM   #42
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I prefer a double clevis link like this:

National Hardware 3248BC 1/2 Double Clevis Link, Zinc | TractorSupply

Properly rated for your chain, of course, for adding length to your chains.
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