Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 02-09-2010, 01:10 PM   #15
Rivet Master
 
HowieE's Avatar
 
1991 34' Excella
Princeton , New Jersey
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 6,814
Images: 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
I simply don't see where 200 pounds of steel hitch is any different than the other things on the tongue of the trailer mentioned above..
It appears you do not understand the purpose of a WD hitch.

In all your comment you have not mentioned that you have ever weighed your trucks front axles after hitching up. If you are not aware of how much weight you have transferred, given without just plain luck, you are more than likely not set up correctly.

Before you discount WD bars on any hitch you should read up on the subject. I follow all to many rigs down the road that are not set up to tow. Some don't want to lift too much weight with the pipe when hitching up. Some want a marshmallow ride in the TV. All to many said that is how the Dealer set it up and there all probably less than 10 Dealer in the country who will take the time to set up a WD hitch correctly.
__________________

__________________
WBCCI 12156 AIR 3144 WACHUNG TAC NJ6
2004 Excursion 4x4
1991 34 ft. Excella +220,000 miles, new laminated flooring, new upholstery, new 3200 lbs axles

HowieE is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 02-09-2010, 02:55 PM   #16
Rivet Master
 
SteveH's Avatar
 
2005 39' Land Yacht 390 XL 396
Common Sense , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 5,311
Quote:
Originally Posted by HowieE View Post
It appears you do not understand the purpose of a WD hitch.
Howie, many times appearances are decieving.

I will not argue my understanding of WD hitches, or my setup capabilites with you, but just state that I've been using, and setting up WD hitches of many different types since the early 70's.
__________________

__________________
Regards,
Steve
SteveH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2010, 10:48 AM   #17
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
Quote:
Originally Posted by SteveH View Post
2air, Please explain to me why the weight of the hitch (mine had a shipping weight of 230 pounds), basically on the ball area, is any different than, oh I don't know, let's say 200 pounds of propane, bottles, and batteries.

I simply don't see where 200 pounds of steel hitch is any different than the other things on the tongue of the trailer mentioned above.

This is what I know.....my hitch weight was 760 pounds before I added the hitch. I know this because I weighed it. My hitch weighs 230 pounds, minus the packing/shipping material. I use 1000 pound bars, and feel they are the perfect weight range for my rig. When hitched up with the proper weight distribution, my bars are bent significantly, and my ride is good.
The difference is that the hitch bars are designed with the weight of the hitch itself taken into consideration. 800 pound bars are intended to be suitable for up to 800 pounds tongue weight plus the weight of the bars and the hitch head.
__________________
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2010, 06:08 PM   #18
Rivet Master
 
SteveH's Avatar
 
2005 39' Land Yacht 390 XL 396
Common Sense , Texas
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 5,311
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jammer View Post
The difference is that the hitch bars are designed with the weight of the hitch itself taken into consideration. 800 pound bars are intended to be suitable for up to 800 pounds tongue weight plus the weight of the bars and the hitch head.
That may be true, but I can tell you the manufacturer recommended 1000 lb bars for my rig (I called and asked), I'm using them, and I'm happy with the ride.
__________________
Regards,
Steve
SteveH is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2010, 08:22 PM   #19
Vintage Kin
 
slowmover's Avatar
 
Fort Worth , Texas
Join Date: Nov 2006
Posts: 7,602
Images: 1
" . . I have talked to an Airstream and a long fifth wheel traveler who have lost control and wrecked their equipment due to sudden, strong cross-wind induced sway here in the Southwest".

" . . I am not clear why a fifth wheel would experience sway or the driver lose control. Fifth wheels have the pin hitch over the truck axle, ideal for minimizing sway. If the driver lost control it was not a hitch issue."

" . . if something can blow over a fifth wheel, there is no trailer hitch that will prevent it from also blowing over a trailer."


To my way of thinking it is a matter of the TV/TT first, best hitch, second, and proper hitch rigging, third. (And anyone is welcome to have at this).

Travel trailer and fifth wheel suspensions share a VERY short amount of travel; 2" up and 2" down in many instances. So let's start with fivers: tall, boxy, long, with terrible aerodynamics and a terrible center-of-gravity (high up) PLUS (for many) a suspension where stability is inherently lousy. I've lived in one of the windier regions of the US for the past few years, and done thousands of miles on the local highways when winds were a constant 25-mph, with gusts to forty mph . . and as I've posted elsewhere, watched those big junkers heel over on their inadequate suspensions as Memaw and Papaw blither onwards cause thar big ol' heavy-dooty pickemup ain't got no steerin' feedback to tell them the fiver is starting to lift as those tall knife-edge walls allow wind to pile up on them!

(And there are threads on rv.net where the discussion is that 25-30 mph winds are enough to park a fiver for the day . . or a square box). Fivers are inherently unstable . . once out of the parking lot. They're about good enough to go from here, to there. In best conditions. Their roadworthiness is low (toyhaulers are probably the worst). Radiused edges and caps might help, I-S might help, but there is no getting around those 10' walls, or the center-of-gravity.

The SOB square boxes aren't much better, especially the ones over 30'. The wind just piles up and pushes. These rigs need ALL the help they can get from weight-scaled WDH (proper hitch rigging) as steering and braking are otherwise adversely affected.

In contrast, an aerodynamic trailer, with an independent suspension (or AVION's MOR/Ryde walking beam suspension) places the "width" of the suspension all the way out to the wheels, increasing stability. Suspension travel may be greater (likelier; especially with I-S).

Couple that to to a body shape that allows wind to "bump" and pass over and the benefits are obvious. Add to that what I've been calling "the gold standard" (sway-eliminating hitch, trailer disc brakes and either factory-integrated or best aftermarket brake control) and there is more elbow room in driver reaction time/distance as wind resistance is lowest.

An aero trailer, properly outfitted, has no competitors. While the weakest link remains the driver, the next is the TV. A 4WD pickup or SUV with beam front axle, and recirc-ball steering is notorious for poor feedback. (And being sloppy on center, even new). An IFS with rack & pinion is much to be preferred. (Same with 4-whl discs). The latest AWD diesel SUV's from Europe are looking better and better for many trailer sizes.

I'm not the only one who has towed in significant crosswinds (or been passed by a succession of tractor-trailers in either direction) and the only time I "felt" the wind was as a result of it hitting my truck cap (not so aero; body moving against suspension where a rear anti-roll bar or panhard rod would be beneficial). Best hitch rigging pays. And there are posts on this site about an A/S owner not realizing it was as windy as it was until he stopped to get out . . . .

Without a video camera to record the incident, and an examination of those rigs afterwards (heck, prior: scale tickets) we can't know what -- beyond a gust of wind -- knocked over those rigs. But much of what is important is already known.
__________________
1990 35' Silver Streak Sterling; 9k GVWR.
2004 DODGE Cummins 305/555; 6-manual; 9k GVWR.
Hensley Arrow. 9-cpm solo, 15-cpm towing
Sold: Silver Streak Model 3411
slowmover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-03-2010, 10:42 PM   #20
Wise Elder
 
Jammer's Avatar
 
2010 30' Classic
Vintage Kin Owner
South of the river , Minnesota
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 4,119
I do agree that there is a sense of invincibility among those RVers who have 5ers and dually pickups.

I think that the 5th wheel hitch is overrated in many ways. The added wind load posed by the inherently higher trailer is but one factor to consider.

One of the benefits of the semi-monocoque design and the torsion axle is a lower overall height. The much-lauded frame and suspension of the Avion trailers results in a trailer that is about a foot higher.
__________________

__________________
Jammer is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
touareg, bambi and weight distribution hitch ericwarren Hitches, Couplers & Balls 2 10-02-2008 10:19 PM
Bambi Weight Distribution Hitch Recommendations gorrissen Hitches, Couplers & Balls 9 05-02-2006 01:35 PM
Which Weight Distribution Hitch to buy? Navigator Hitches, Couplers & Balls 7 11-19-2003 08:56 AM
how works a weight distribution hitch remcolent Hitches, Couplers & Balls 5 11-10-2003 07:24 PM
Recommendation on weight distribution hitch davidlaxson Hitches, Couplers & Balls 30 08-31-2003 10:38 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 10:33 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.