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Old 08-21-2005, 06:26 PM   #57
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Exeter , Rhode Island
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Originally Posted by bdlwet
Perhaps it is because I am such a newby here or perhaps it is that I notice little or no sway in my trailer loaded with clothes, food, water. I look at my little hitch and know it is fine for me and I pull another trailer at almost 6000 lbs, (flatbed with electric brakes too) Sway is just not a real big issue with my driving. Is it seen as a real bugaboo with most people? I know I use my brake controller like I have used it on 50 foot trailer I have driven when driving semi's. It readily straightens out trailer. Have also used electric brakes to straighten trailers out on snow covered roads.. What is glamour about big fancy hitches? Am I missing some special need?
Most people who own Hensley hitches tow trailers much longer than 24 feet. The longer the travel trailer the more likely that it will sway. My TT is 32' in length. Eight feet longer than yours, which makes it more susceptible to semi's passing and crosswinds. Semi's don't have a sway problem because of their weight and the eighteen wheels that they have. Flatbed trailers don't have a sway problem because they are flat and not affected by crosswinds and semi's. They have no sides to catch the wind. It all depends on what you are towing and what you are towing with.
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Old 08-21-2005, 10:06 PM   #58
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Originally Posted by Big Dee
Anyone not like the Hensley? Thanks everyone.
Rocket science for your bumper.
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Old 08-22-2005, 08:15 AM   #59
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Originally Posted by Rob30044
Flatbed trailers don't have a sway problem because they are flat and not affected by crosswinds and semi's. They have no sides to catch the wind.
Even a flatbed trailer can sway. I had it happen to me once with a load of firewood on a tandem axle car hauler. It was one of the scariest things that ever happened to me while driving. The sway was not caused by the wind, maybe the load wasn't balanced right front to back, and it didn't help that I was pulling with an Astro which has a fairly short wheelbase. Fortunately I was able to get it under control by putting the trailer brakes on manually, but I felt like I was just on the verge of losing control and it could have been a disaster as I was on a busy expressway.

A friend who bought a used 19' SOB in the spring had his hitch installed at an RV dealer, and the dealer didn't even mention sway control, just sold him a weight-distributing hitch. My friend pulled the trailer with his Astro a thousand miles or so (wondering how he was going to get through the trip with the trailer swaying so badly) before he talked to another RVer and learned about sway control. After they stopped at another RV dealer and got a friction sway bar their trip was much better. Unfortunately I was already on my way to Alaska while all this was going on so was not around to help him get ready for his first trip.
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Old 08-22-2005, 09:36 AM   #60
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Originally Posted by DavidsonOverlander
Even a flatbed trailer can sway.
I once came upon a wrecked Jeep that had been towing a flat bed trailer at least 24' long. That trailer flung the Jeep around like a puppy would an old rag.

Flatbed or no, tongue weight, tow vehicle wheelbase, and sway control still matter.

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Old 08-22-2005, 02:31 PM   #61
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Exeter , Rhode Island
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Originally Posted by DavidsonOverlander
Even a flatbed trailer can sway. I had it happen to me once with a load of firewood on a tandem axle car hauler. It was one of the scariest things that ever happened to me while driving. The sway was not caused by the wind, maybe the load wasn't balanced right front to back, and it didn't help that I was pulling with an Astro which has a fairly short wheelbase. My friend pulled the trailer with his Astro
Please read the last sentence of my previous post.
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Old 08-23-2005, 10:11 PM   #62
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i like the hensley too

hi folks

not usually grabbed my market hype and the hensley crash pictures 'without one' turned me off toward the product......

and delayed my purchase by 2 months.

BUT (big but here) i've been towing now, with the arrow for 4 months and 8k miles.....it really is amazing how it controls sway or yaw. cross winds, bow waves, poorly banked curves, on coming traffic, high speed passing, sudden braking......the trailer just holds the line. i've even tried to wiggle it (open roads with NO ONE nearby) and after 2-3 ossilations of 6 inches max (on a 34), and it's back to the straight arrow.

one of the more impressive images is big cross winds.

looking ahead or back the semi's are clearly affected, going down the road with the rear tires 2-3 feet off track and correcting whenever another pulls up to block the wind. work trailers and travel trailers wiggling everywhere, boats behind 5ers behind dually trucks looking like a chinese snake parade....

and the airstream/hensley continues to move in line and without drama.

amazing.

also i have yet to trigger the brake controller manually since there's been no need to 'straighten' things any more than they already are from the hitch action.

one comment i'd differ on......
"The longer the travel trailer the more likely that it will sway"

any length trailer can experience yaw/sway and many conditions can trigger it...winds, waves, braking, blow outs, road ruts, uneven pavement, contract with another vehicle, brake lock up.....and many others.

some conditions are more likely to affect short trailers whiles others provoke the longer trailers....and 1, 2 or 3 trailer axles also add to the mix. combine these with the tv variables like weight, wheel base hitch height, disc/drum brake combo's vs 4w disc...

and lets not forget hitch weight as a % of trailer weight......do you really think everyone has this correctly adjusted?

and, type of brake controller, type of trailer brakes and so on..........

it's just not accurate to suggest longer trailers experience more sway.

but the hensley is well worth the cash, comfort, piece of mind and easy of use by far......

cheers
2air'
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