Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 06-22-2006, 02:02 AM   #15
Rivet Master
 
bhayden's Avatar
 
1978 24' Argosy 24
Woodinville , Washington
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 661
Images: 10
Right, I think the trailer axle position is a non-factor in determining loads on the hitch. It's purely touge weight. That's not to say it doesn't affect handling considerations.

"knocking the fillings out of the driver's teeth" is a sensation I remember from my parents '86 Ford 3/4 pick-up truck. Towed great, just don't drive somewhere whithout a load! New rigs are MUCH better.

-Bernie
__________________

__________________
bhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-22-2006, 02:07 AM   #16
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
Hello too all ,

First ,the real objective as has been adressed is getting the tv and trailer level when the wd is loaded and bars sinched up properly ,Billtex has discovered this with his setup.The wd cannot lower the front end down past
its factory height ,as it is suppose to bring the rear and front to level ,
equal distibution of weight along the trailer and tv frames . When level
it can't force the rear up higher ,as then the trailer tongue and tvrear would be upwards of level and that won't happen .Sinched up too tight the setup
would then become very rigid ,needs some give to it ,the bars should have an upward curvature to them when loaded correctly ,yet not extreme ,when its hitched properly and also be level .The pickup deal is easy to see understand
as they are light in the rear ,when empty .Still the hitching would still be the same and more tongue weight would give much better control .The bar #
would be a decision based on the truck being empty or loaded with gear.
The equalizer hitch use to use bars with chains as far back as i can remember
and the setup on my travelall was an equalizer hitch .Equalizer was the first
setup of this type ,round bars 400# and up with chains and brackets.Hence the generic name used for most wd hitches .

Scott
__________________

__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2006, 01:47 PM   #17
Rivet Master
 
1963 19' Globetrotter
Currently Looking...
Moline , Illinois
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 635
Love that Equal-i-zer especially in the mountains and wind of Wyoming and Montanna. One thing to remember is make sure the tire pressures are correct for towing . Stick with what the manufacturer of your vehicle recommends.
__________________
63air is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2006, 02:39 PM   #18
Rivet Master
 
bhayden's Avatar
 
1978 24' Argosy 24
Woodinville , Washington
Join Date: May 2006
Posts: 661
Images: 10
Quote:
Originally Posted by scottanlily
Hello too all ,
.The wd cannot lower the front end down past
its factory height ,as it is suppose to bring the rear and front to level ,
equal distibution of weight along the trailer and tv frames . When level
it can't force the rear up higher ,as then the trailer tongue and tvrear would be upwards of level and that won't happen .
I think I'm confused with the wording. The WD hitch can most certainly lower the front down past its "factory height". By factory height I assume you mean the height without the TT attached. If the front is higher than "factory height" then you have a situation in which there is less weight on the front than when unhitched and a weight in excess of the tongue weight being carried by the rear. That's what you have without a WD hitch.

What I've found works best is an equal amount of compression in both the front and rear. Both are 1" lower when hitched than without the trailer. That leaves the TV level but 1" lower all around. The instructions that came with my Reese hitch say to never lower the front more than the rear. That's a ROT that I've found to be true. They suggest considerably more sag in the rear than what I've found to provide the best towing characteristics.

-Bernie
__________________
bhayden is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2006, 02:44 PM   #19
Tom, the Uber Disney Fan
 
Minnie's Mate's Avatar
 
2006 30' Safari
Orlando , Florida
Join Date: Aug 2004
Posts: 4,693
Images: 7
I have had a slight amount of sway with my Equal-i-zer on our first two outings. First was because of uneven load distribution inside the trailer...to much weight on the street side and not enough on the curb side. Redistribution of load corrected 99% of this. Still had some "sway" so I had the alignment checked on the truck. The alignment was right on, but the rear wheels were low in air. After airing up the rear tires, I have noticed an improvement in the solo handling of the truck without the trailer. This week end will be the first opportunity to try with the trailer since the proper inflation of the tires, but I think that should take care of the remaining sway. My tire store did mention that 3/4 ton trucks (at least the Fords) have more play in the sterring than lighter duty trucks so this may account for some of the perceived sway. Long and short of it, tire pressure will definately make a difference, but some may be the natural handling characteristic of your TV under load.
__________________
2006 30' Safari - "Changes in Latitudes"
2008 F-250 Lariat Power Stroke Diesel Crew Cab SWB
Family of Disney Fanatics
WBCCI# 4821
http://streaminacrossamerica.com/
Minnie's Mate is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-27-2006, 04:11 PM   #20
4 Rivet Member
 
AZstreamin's Avatar
 
2005 30' Safari
Chandler , Arizona
Join Date: Feb 2006
Posts: 497
Images: 4
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnie's Mate
I have had a slight amount of sway with my Equal-i-zer on our first two outings. First was because of uneven load distribution inside the trailer...to much weight on the street side and not enough on the curb side. Redistribution of load corrected 99% of this. Still had some "sway" so I had the alignment checked on the truck. The alignment was right on, but the rear wheels were low in air. After airing up the rear tires, I have noticed an improvement in the solo handling of the truck without the trailer. This week end will be the first opportunity to try with the trailer since the proper inflation of the tires, but I think that should take care of the remaining sway. My tire store did mention that 3/4 ton trucks (at least the Fords) have more play in the sterring than lighter duty trucks so this may account for some of the perceived sway. Long and short of it, tire pressure will definately make a difference, but some may be the natural handling characteristic of your TV under load.
MM,
What are pressure are you running your tires at when towing?
AZstreamin
__________________
AZstreamin is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-28-2006, 07:06 AM   #21
1 Rivet Short
 
1989 25' Excella
By The Bay , Rhode Island
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,547
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by Minnie's Mate
I have had a slight amount of sway with my Equal-i-zer on our first two outings. First was because of uneven load distribution inside the trailer...to much weight on the street side and not enough on the curb side. Redistribution of load corrected 99% of this. Still had some "sway" so I had the alignment checked on the truck. The alignment was right on, but the rear wheels were low in air. After airing up the rear tires, I have noticed an improvement in the solo handling of the truck without the trailer. This week end will be the first opportunity to try with the trailer since the proper inflation of the tires, but I think that should take care of the remaining sway. My tire store did mention that 3/4 ton trucks (at least the Fords) have more play in the sterring than lighter duty trucks so this may account for some of the perceived sway. Long and short of it, tire pressure will definately make a difference, but some may be the natural handling characteristic of your TV under load.
Minnie, not sure what you are experiencing is "sway". Sway is typically defined as severe and uncontrollable side to side motion of your trailer, sounds to me like you are experienceing "wandering" in the front end of your TV, similiar to what I experienced as described when I started this post. I suspect you need to put more of the weigt on your front end.

Max tire pressure is a given when towing; always check both TV and TT tires before heading out. Carry a good quality digital gauge in your glove box also.

I think you will find, like most of us, once you find the proper settings for your hitch, you will not have to fuss with it any longer. But things like tire pressure and bolt torque are regular maintainence items that should be checked every trip.
__________________
BillTex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2006, 12:36 AM   #22
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
Hello bhayden ,

basically the way you have responded to my wording is correct ,but say your
vehical is level ,then hitch the trailer,rear pulls down ,the front goes up.jack up the trailer jack (still hitched) to get the bars installed .You lower the jack
and your bars have no upward curve and the rear is low and not level .Repeat and sinch up the bars as needed .Lower back down and the vehical is now
level ,the rear looks as it was and the front is now back down level .If your
trailer ,when unhitched and level ,and your tv also level unhitched ,and the tongue and hitch ball are at the correct height each the same height.Why
then when hitched up and the bars tensioned properly could the frame
on the tv be lower in the front more than the rear ?The idea is to have the frames loaded equally as is possible .I have tensioned the bars on my travelall
and all is level and the front end is not lower than it was unhitched ,but if maybe the trailer coupler is higher than the tow vehical hitch ball height and then the bars are tensioned ,that could do it .Any thing is possible if things are not setup quite right .I have seen many tv trailer setups where the tv
and trailer hitch setups are all over the map on the setup ,totally wrong.
The tv and trailer hitch ball and coupler height must first be correct ,when
each are sitting level ,first thing to make sure or any WD install cannot
be right ,the concern needs to be that the rear of the tv comes back up to level as the bars are tensioned ,this 1" lower/higher business is a baseline
really to get you close ,and some have found out that level works the best.

Scott
__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2006, 12:44 AM   #23
Rivet Master
 
1960 24' Tradewind
santa barbara , California
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,352
I forgot to mention about the considerably more sag in the rear makes it handle better idea .Bars being too rigid high# than needed ,or light tongue
weight can be a factor as reese is saying that they don't want the rear too
"light" so sag it a little ,somthing is not right if you need to drag the rear
a little instead of a level setup ,unless the bars are ! a too high a # say
1000# than 550# .People always think the heaviest bars are the best .
Not true ,the correct rated bars are the best.

Scott
__________________
scottanlily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2006, 08:05 AM   #24
Rivet Master
 
2003 25' Safari
Eden Prairie , Minnesota
Join Date: Nov 2002
Posts: 765
Images: 3
As you discovered, changing the head angle of the Equal-i-zer brand hitch from 4-6 degrees to zero degrees is not a "minor adjustment". Essentially this removes all, or nearly all, tension from the bars... effectivly disabling the weight distribution and friction anti-sway elements of the hitch.

The head angle and/or L-brackets may need some adjustment to achieve the proper weight distribution, which is discussed in steps 1 and 12 of the instructions.

To resolve your shank height issue, you can either you can have a machine shop cut off the excess length or purchase another shank of proper length. Note that the shank is tough metal (I had one cut off for my previous tow vehicle), so purchasing a new shank is the easiest route.
__________________
Dan
dmac is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2006, 08:12 AM   #25
1 Rivet Short
 
1989 25' Excella
By The Bay , Rhode Island
Join Date: Apr 2006
Posts: 1,547
Images: 3
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmac
As you discovered, changing the head angle of the Equal-i-zer brand hitch from 4-6 degrees to zero degrees is not a "minor adjustment". Essentially this removes all, or nearly all, tension from the bars... effectivly disabling the weight distribution and friction anti-sway elements of the hitch.

The head angle and/or L-brackets may need some adjustment to achieve the proper weight distribution, which is discussed in steps 1 and 12 of the instructions.
dmac-that is absolutely right. Pretty sacry ride for about 1/2 mile, untill I figured it out...
__________________
BillTex is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2006, 02:22 PM   #26
3 Rivet Member
 
B25guy's Avatar
 
2003 25' Safari
Yakima , Washington
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 153
Images: 20
no more sway, now

I use the Eqal-I-zer W/D hitch an now love it. I didn't before playing with it and felt like it added very little to provide sway reduction. It always provided a noticable W/D effect with 1200# bars (although with my old-style Dodge diesel and war surplus springs, it didn't need help with load carrying), in fact makes the truck drive like a late model truck. By playing with I mean that I had to modify how it is connected, specifically the bars and how they interact with the brackets (on the tongue). I noticed that whenever I would go about hooking things up, the L-brackets would always rock back and forth within the pockets they are clamped in. Even torquing the square bolt to the manuf specs, it still rocked. Supposedly, the manuf states that the friction area between the bars and brackets serves as a "secondary sway control system". I guess I couldn't figure out how this much slop in the bracket provided any amount of sway control???
Having the correct height adjustment set up, I noticed that the bottom hole in the height adjustment L-bracket lined up pretty close to the bolt used to clamp the bracket to the tongue. If I reversed the bottom bolt (from the manuf install) and put a jambnut (a slimmer nut) to tighten the clamp mechanism to the tongue, there was enough thread left to go through the L-bracket and firmly clamp the L-bracket to the tongue. Then I torqued the square bolt to spec. Not a lick of movement anywhere. Considering that while driving, the amount of translation imparted to the load bars (fore/aft) from the angular movement of the hitch versus TV was very small based on small sway movements (I calculated this all out on paper some months ago after gathering some on-road data), any amount of slop would eliminate the benefit of this "secondary sway control system". After running with this setup now for about 4000 miles, the sway is very much held in check and I can feel a difference when recovering from a passing semi. While there is, and always will be, an initial sway because of the massive amount of the semi's bow wave, the recovery is nearly instantaneous versus before where it seemed to dampen over a period of a few (sometimes scary) seconds.
I mentioned this to the manuf and they never got back to me...
I'm a mechanical engineer by trade so things like this entrigue me, hence the "playing with" mentality. Anybody else found those L-brackets oddly loose?
__________________
B25guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2006, 03:09 PM   #27
Rivet Master
 
myoung's Avatar
 
Nipomo , California
Join Date: Sep 2005
Posts: 627
Images: 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by B25guy
After running with this setup now for about 4000 miles, the sway is very much held in check and I can feel a difference when recovering from a passing semi. While there is, and always will be, an initial sway because of the massive amount of the semi's bow wave, the recovery is nearly instantaneous versus before where it seemed to dampen over a period of a few (sometimes scary) seconds.
Anybody else found those L-brackets oddly loose?
Two things from our experience. We too have a 25-foot Safari and an Equal-i-zer. Our brackets are loose as you call it, but that is the way it was set up by our dealer and doesn't seem to cause any adverse effect. As to sway caused by semis/buses/etc., we experience absolutely, absolutely zero, zero. I know that people are disbelieving of this statement, but I swear that it is true.

So, perhaps you might want to do a little more tweaking to see if you too can reduce the giant sucking to zero. One thing that I notice from your account that differs from our setup is that your bars are rated at 1,200 pounds while ours are 1,000 pounds. Perhaps ours are more supple at the margin.

Oh, there's another difference in wheelbase that might have some effect although this is another case where the learned opinion on the Forum suggests that my SUV is deficient in this regard.
__________________
Mike Young & Rosemary Nelson

Bowlus Road Chief "Endymion" (coming soon)
BMW X3 xDrive 28D
myoung is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 07-19-2006, 03:37 PM   #28
3 Rivet Member
 
B25guy's Avatar
 
2003 25' Safari
Yakima , Washington
Join Date: Aug 2003
Posts: 153
Images: 20
Mike/Rosemary,

Your TV has a much shorter distance between rear wheels and hitch versus my LWB, 4x4 on aging leaf spring bushings. This shorter distance has a very positive inflluence in sway as has been noted throughout the Forum. It doesn't surprise me that you don't experience sway and I believe it is because of your softer bars and shorter hitch/axle distance. I'm certain my remaining sway, albeit very minor, is due to my TV: aging bushings, leaf spring front axle (with well known inherent steering play) and axle to spring height due to factory installed blocks. My primary concern was to maximize the sway control, both primary and secondary, provided in the Equal-I-zer. I still don't think anybody is getting any/much benefit from these loose brackets while the manuf claims is "...secondary control". No doubt most if not all are experiencing adequate primary sway control from the friction in the hitch head (both ball and bar sockets).
I don't know that I'd necessarily agree that your TV is not adequate for a 25' Safari but my personal preference is definitely 3/4 ton. I feel very much in control and spent considerable time on mountainous roads between Utah and Montana. I've also towed on solid snow/ice in Virginia last winter with little to no discomfort (that's me at a rest area in VA in my avatar...must have had 500lbs of ice on the coach when I stopped there).
__________________

__________________
B25guy is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Hitch height Chuck Hitches, Couplers & Balls 20 04-09-2016 11:21 PM
Hensley Arrow Hitch Les Hitches, Couplers & Balls 116 12-14-2015 08:41 AM
Equalizer hitch and sway control Rod Pease Airstream Trailer Forums 15 04-07-2006 12:00 PM
Hitch problem wyhjr Hitches, Couplers & Balls 8 07-22-2002 06:29 PM
Hitch inspections 83Excella Hitches, Couplers & Balls 3 07-09-2002 04:05 PM


Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 04:36 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.