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Old 07-22-2007, 02:15 PM   #1
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Equal-I-Zer Hitch Setup Report

Howdy Gang!

Yesterday I set up my new Equal-I-Zer hitch. After reading mostly positives on here, seeing a few negatives, and reading many posts about how a proper setup gives a great handling rig and an improper setup can give problems, I ordered their video. After watching it, I bought a 14,000lb Equal-I-Zer.

Why such a big one? Well, my second trailer has a tongue weight that can exceed 1000 lbs. I called Progress Mfg. and talked to one of their engineers. He told me that you must size the hitch not just by the gross weight allowed, but by the tongue weight possible. If there's any chance at all you can go over 1000lbs of tongue weight, then you must go to a heavier hitch.

The next size up is the 12,000 lb hitch with 1200 lb tongue weight capacity (vs. the 10,000 lb hitch with 1000 lb tongue weight capacity). Upon further inspection, the 12,000 lb hitch uses the same weight distribution bars as the 14,000 lb hitch does. So, I opted to get the big one for the stouter head unit.

OK, on to the setup.

The directions that come with the Equal-I-zer are pretty good, IMHO. The biggest trick is when you put the ball onto the hitch, the recepticle that the nut must go up into from the bottom is very small. A standard 1 7/8" socket will not fit into it. As well, this nut must be torqued to at least 400 ft-lbs. I got a socket but it would not fit. What do to? Progress Mfg. will sell you this socket for $75. They also provide it to their dealers such that if you buy the hitch from a dealer, they will be able to tighten it. But what to do in my case? Well, where I work has a fleet of diesel trucks. I figured surely the maintenance shop would have such a socket. Sure enough, they did...and a 3/4" drive impact gun to go with it This impact gun is capable of 700 ft-lbs so we had no trouble getting it to about 450. The ball actually spec'd 450 ft-lbs; Equal-I-Zer says do 400 or more if the ball maker calls for it.

OK, so now the ball is mounted to the hitch head. My truck sits pretty high and I had to use a drop shank. I stuck it on 4" low, stuck the trailer on there, and pulled it into the local middle school where I had a nice big flat parking lot. 4" low didn't look bad until the weight settled on it. Had the front of the trailer riding a mite low.

OK, unhitch and take measurements at the front and rear wheel wells. Measured the hitch height to the inside top of the ball receiver of the trailer, then measured the height to the top of the ball of the truck. You then add 1/8" per 100 lbs of tongue weight to the ball height needed on the truck.

Set the proper angle. Directions said to use 5 washers over a rivet shank that fits into the hitch up high and holds the top out. Five seemed to be too much of an angle (they want you to have 4-6 degrees of cant aft). I reduced it to four washers. You then tighten a set screw at the bottom of the hitch which prevents it from moving aft past that point. That establishes the proper cant. Simple.

Stick it in the receiver and drop the trailer on it. Now take measurements loaded. The front of my truck was going up about a half inch and the rear was going down about two inches. I the some math and had to move the ball up one notch. That basically put the top of the ball level with the top of the draw bar. I put a level on the trailer and got it sitting parallel to the ground.

So now I have the hitch head setup and know how much I need to raise the back and lower the front of the truck.

On the trailer tongue, you have to mount the L-brackets. They call out 32" from the center point of the ball, but anywhere from 29-32 will work. I measured back 31" and put mine there. My trailer A-frame is 6" deep and the Equal-I-Zer's standard L-bracket linkages max out at 6", so it was a very good fit. I got that all mounted up and tightened down. You then slide the L up or down in the brackets to get the right height for the spring bars to fit into.

Instructions say to start five holes up. There was no way in the world I could spring those bars up that much, so I had to drop my L's down one notch. I then hitched the truck to the trailer, locked the ball, and used the trailer jack to pick up the tongue and the truck with it. This allows you to snap the bars into the L-brackets with little force. You then lower the system back down and raise the jack off the ground.

The long and short of it is that with this setup, the front of the truck doesn't move at all; stays at exactly the same height as empty. The back squats down just about an inch. The rig looks just about perfectly level; maybe just a hair (and I mean a fine hair) low in the front if anything.

I took it for a test run. Whereas the truck pulled the big triple axle pretty straight just on the ball, she was solid as the rock of Gibraltar with the Eq all set up.

I didn't drive very far with it, but I could feel a huge difference compared to pulling it the 600 miles home on just the ball. I did not lube any of the contact points yet, and it was noisy making tight turns. The L-brackets look to be shifting a little, like rocking about 5 degrees fore and aft depending upon which way the spring bar is going (i.e. on the inside of a turn, the spring bar rubs the bottom of the bar aft, on the outside it pulls it forward). I've not torqued them down yet. That may clear that up. That may not be happening, but that's my guess. I shall have to watch it. It may just be some metal to metal noise. I like the parrafin wax trick and will probably do that to lube them where they rub the L's. If a guy planned on keeping the trailer, i don't see why the brackets that the L slides in couldn't simply be welded to the trailer tongue. I may do just that if I can't keep it from moving. Can't be more than $50 worth of parts there.

At any rate, I did not find this hitch difficult to set up properly. When I first pulled it the five miles to the parking lot, I didn't have the lower angle stop set properly. The ball was canted aft at too much of an angle. But once I got it set up right, the thing pulls like a champ.

I'll report back after some miles (planning an 800 mile run next month). So far, though, I think this hitch was a good choice.

Cheers,
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Old 07-22-2007, 02:55 PM   #2
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Jim,

Thanks for posting such good instructions. I could actually visualize what you wrote.

My hitch was setup by the dealers But I'm going to print a copy of your instructions for future reference.

Thanks again.
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Old 07-22-2007, 07:08 PM   #3
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Hey Dennis,

Thanks for the praise. Glad I could be of some help. It's really not hard to set up. Their directions are pretty good. Once a guy knew what he was doing, he could set one up in probably 45 minutes. Took me about two hours total. I put the hitch together (wrongly) and the L-brackets on at my house. Towed it to the school lot on just the ball, then set it all up there. It really does pull nicely.

I think once I lube the L-brackets to quiet it down, this thing will really shine.

Best of luck!
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Old 07-26-2007, 03:12 PM   #4
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Jim,

Great post on the set up of the Equal-i-zer.

My dealer's initial installation (which was wrong because he didn't drop the gas line) had my trailer running a little down in the front. When he repaired the installation he corrected that so the trailer now runs level. He also moved up the L-brackets up a notch.

I measured my set-up after his tweaking and found that the truck rises about a 1/4 of an inch in front, and squats about an inch in the back. Sounds like this is where you are sitting too.

My Equal-i-zer performance, towing about 3,000 miles now has been very good. High winds and passing trucks don't give me any more problem that they would if the trailer wasn't on back.

Randy
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Old 07-26-2007, 03:51 PM   #5
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I've towed about 9,000 miles with my Equal-i-zer so far and have had great success with it. Two observations I have made: 1) You must have balanced air pressure in all tires on the tow vehicle. Preferably the maximum recommended by the tire's manufacturer. Initially, I found that I had different pressures in each of the four tires. 2) You need the proper amount of weight on the front axle so that you have sufficient traction on your turning wheels. This last one may not seem so important, but I have hauled a 1,000 lb. golf cart in the bed of my truck while towing my Airstream and felt like I didn't have enough "contact" with the front tires to have good steering control and had a tendency to wander in the lane. Also, when I first started towing my Ford dealer had reduced the psi in my tires to improve the ride and the truck seemed to wallow all over the lane. When I run within 5 psi of the max air pressure in the tires I have no sway and no rambling in the lane. Also, when the bed is empty or I remember to adjust the L-brackets for the additional weight on the rear axle, I have no ramblings in the lane. When both are correctly set, I can tow on the interstate using my thumb and forefinger without any problems and really have a great level of comfort in my towing.

If you don't use some kind of lube on the L-brackets, you will get a popping sound in sharp turns. I use aerosol silicone spray that doesn't attract dirt and doesn't leave a glob of grease on the brackets and I don't hear the popping sound when I turn. With these small adjustments and spraying lube on the brackets I have excellent results with my Equal-i-zer hitch.

There are other excellent hitches out there and I certainly don't suggest that they are inferior to the Equal-i-zer, but I do believe that the Eq is every bit as good as any other hitch system when set up properly and the tow vehicle is set up properly to match and would recommend it to anyone.
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Old 07-27-2007, 10:07 PM   #6
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Nice report on the proper setup, Jim. I can vouch on the importance of proper air pressure in the tires. I set my tires for 75psi in the rear and 70psi in the front. It made a HUGE difference in how my rig handles when towing.

Proper setup and installation of the Equal-i-zer is key. If it isn't setup properly, it won't work as advertised and you will be dissapointed.
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Old 07-28-2007, 10:20 AM   #7
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My Eq was set up improperly. The L bracket on the street side kept coming loose and the bracket moved. I took it back to the dealer and, rather than drill out the rivets that hold the hanger for the gas line in order to drop the line he welded both brackets to the tongue and torqued the bolts. So far, no more problems. However, based on what I have learned on the forum since, if the brackets are installed properly, that is the bolt on the street side goes over the gas line and in thru the second hole from the bottom, welding isn't necessary. Torquing the bolts will secure the brackets permantly.

John
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Old 07-28-2007, 02:04 PM   #8
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Hey Everyone,

I'm still tweaking my Equal-I-Zer. I called Progress Mfg. and talked to one oft he engineer guys there who set me straight on some stuff. My newer trailer has an inverted tongue, which means the ball mount is at the bottom of the tongue rather than at the top, so I had to flip the links that the L-bracket goes into upside down. Previously I had almost no adjustment left. Now I've got tons. I had it set up where the front of the truck didn't move at all and the back squatted 1 inch. That's within tolerance, but Josh there said I could dial it in even closer.

Now, there is one problem I've run into. They say not to tighten the half inch bolts too much in the link plates. That will pinch the top and bottom together and bow out the center. But, if I didn't tighten them to where it started bowing, then I could move the L-bracket with my hand. Obviously that's not tight enough.

I'd considered just welding the bracket to the frame like John did. I was going to do just that, but then had another idea. I got two pieces of 1/2" thick steel plate at work that are about 3" by 8". It's about an inch wider than the link that came with it and about an inch longer. I welded my factory links to these plates. I then drilled the holes on through the new 1/2" plates to match the two holes I run the bolts through. So what I did was make two doubler plates for each side, so now my "clamp" is 7/8" wide rather than 3/8" wide. The doublers go on the inside, against the frame. Now I can clamp it down tighter without bending/flexing the link plates. I think this will take care of the L-bracket/links rocking issue once and for all. If it doesn't, I'll weld them to the A-frame

Anyway, I'll report back once I get it all hooked up and set up again. By inverting the links, it put the hole setting about 1/4" lower than what I had before. So if I move the L-bracket up one notch, that'll be 3/4" higher than I was. That much additional pressure on the load bars will probably get rid of the 1" of squat on the rear of my truck. At least some of it. It towed fine before. I'll let you guys know.

On the tire pressures, I usually run about 55psi in the front of my diesel Dodge since it's so super front heavy and 40-45psi in the back. For towing, I've been leaving the front the same and running 68psi in the back. It seemed to do just fine at that. I may get one of those infrared thermometers and start checking tire temps. Maybe I need more in the front?

Type ya later!
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Old 07-28-2007, 11:41 PM   #9
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Doubler Plates...aka No More Movement!

Howdy Equal-I-Zer fans!

I got my new and improved link plates installed and thought I'd share 'em.

As mentioned above, the OEM plates from Equal-I-Zer were moving on me. I'd repainted the tongue and it was pretty smooth. The link plates are good and smooth. And if you torque 'em down much at all, as the bolts are located above and below the frame, you wind up pinching the two plates together top and bottom and bowing the center and you don't get good contact. Then the plate moves as the load bars push and pull. And if you don't tighten them enough, then you can move the links with your hands. What to do??

Well, here's what I did: I welded the link plates to 1/2" thick doubler plates. Then drilled out the holes and painted them up nice. I had to replace the 4" long Grade 5 bolts as they were no longer long enough. I replaced them with Grade 8 bolts that were 5" long. I also included a washer and a lock washer on the inside edge. Progress Mfg. did not include lock washers in their kit. They told me you don't need them, but I prefer to have them.

I also got an old inner tube from local tire place for free. I cut out strips of rubber that are the width of the doubler plates and the height to just equal the frame of my trailer and fit between the grade 8 bolts. I put the rubber between the doubler plates and the frame. This serves too purposes: (A) It provides friction between the link/doubler plate and the frame to provide added resistance to movement (B) it allows any uneveness/waviness in the frame to be accounted for.

The results were quite dramatic. I sort of followed Equal-I-Zer's instructions in that I tightened the nuts on the bolts evenly. However, I went much tighter than they recommended because I can now. I first torqued them to 30 ft-lbs, and then to 50 ft-lbs. The links are on there rock solid now; there is no movement whatsoever. The L-bracket is free to move a little, as it's designed to do. But, the actual link plates are on there good and solid, for the duration.

I think this mod is a worthy addtion. Even at 50 ft-lbs of torque, there is no bowing in my plates whatsoever. By welding the 3/8" OEM plates to my 1/2" plates, there is no slippage, and so I've effectively made a 7/8" thick link plate. It takes a LOT to yield 7/8" of steel; way more than what I've torqued them too. And, the cost to do this was next to zero, if you don't count my labor . I got the 1/2" plate as scrap from work, already had the black paint, and owned the welding machine (OK, so maybe this is the first real application for my $2500 welder...don't tell my wife ). Even if you had to pay somebody to weld it, it would only be about $20 or so.

In my ever humble opinion, the link plates shifting is the one weakness of the Equal-I-Zer. Other than that, I'm thinking it's a great hitch. And, it's easy to fix this little flaw. You could either weld the link plate to the A-Frame of the trailer directly, or do what I did. It would actually be easier to just weld it to the tongue. Only deal there is you're out $76 if you ever want to sell the trailer but keep the Eq. Whoopdeeedooo, right. Well, my "vertical up" welding is even worse than my flat, so I went with the doublers because (A) I could weld them flat and (B) I could take it to another trailer. Eq does have a life time warranty ya know

I've attached some pictures here to show what I did. The red "1" shows the original plate, the green "2" is the doubler. Yes, I know, my welds aren't beautiful, but they're structurally sound, and there's not much load on them. Hey, I just took the one semester class last fall and haven't gotten to practice much

Anyway, this baby doesn't move now! I'm taking her on an 800+ mile run next month. I'll report back how she does!

See ya on the road!
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Old 07-28-2007, 11:47 PM   #10
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Tongue

I must have maxxed out what the server will allow for one posting. Here's the pic of the tongue showing the mountup.
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Old 07-30-2007, 08:47 AM   #11
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Excellent report Jim. Nice job!
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Old 07-30-2007, 09:10 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Relentless
... based on what I have learned on the forum since, if the brackets are installed properly, that is the bolt on the street side goes over the gas line and in thru the second hole from the bottom, welding isn't necessary. Torquing the bolts will secure the brackets permantly.





The bolt on the curb side should go between the gas line and the tongue frame with a spacer between the gas line and the bolt to prevent the two from rubbing against each other as shown below.
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Old 08-17-2007, 10:47 PM   #13
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Post Fine Tuning the Equal-i-zer, Part 1 of 2

Previously, on Post #4 above, I reported that after my dealer fixed the hitch installation he did some "tuning" of the set-up. The trailer is now level, but the truck rises a little in the front and squats in the back. I didn't notice any towing performance change with this, but I decided to check in with Josh Jones at Equal-i-zer just in case. Here's part 1 of the message exchange:

Quote:
Hi Josh,

I took my Airstream back to the dealer on July 5 because they had installed the hitch wrong. While there, they dropped the gas line so that the bolt on the curbside mounting plate could be next to the frame. They had to replace the inside plate as it was bent and bowed. It seems like the problem I was having with the L-bracket coming loose has been fixed by that action. Thanks for your help on that issue.

While at the dealer, they noticed that the trailer was a little nose down when hitched up. They corrected this by moving the L-brackets up one hole on the mounting plates. This leveled the trailer perfectly.

When I returned home, several days later, I thought I would do the reference height measurements. What I found when hitched is the front of the truck rises 1/8 inch, and the rear squats 1 3/8 inch. The trailer is still nice and level when hitched, and I didn't notice anything different with the towing performance from before the dealer made this adjustment.

Is this measurement within an acceptable range, or is there something else I should do?

Thanks,

Randall Godfrey
------------------------------------------------------------------------
Hello Randall,

You want BOTH the front and the rear of your tow vehicle to compress down by
nearly equal amounts. Neither end of your truck should lift higher than it
started. While the rear is squatting down 1 3/8", the front has "negative
squat", and is lifting up 1/8". So basically you have a 1 1/2" difference
in compression, when it should be 1" or less. Ideally, the front and rear
compress by lesser, even amounts.

I would suggest that you continue to increase your hitch adjustment settings
for more weight transfer. Your current measurements indicate that there is
still too much weight on the rear axle, and not enough on the front. You
need to transfer just a little more weight.

It is not enough just to worry about getting your trailer level. If you
have the right Shank, you can level out any trailer while completely
ignoring the squat that is happening on the tow vehicle. That is only
solving half of the problem that the Equal-i-zer Hitch is supposed to be
doing. Instead, you want BOTH things to happen at once: even compression on
the front and rear of your truck, and then a level trailer.

You need to add more Spacer Washers and/or raise the L-Brackets higher,
until you get better compression on the front and rear of your truck. Not
only do you want to prevent the rear from squatting down as much, you
actually want to get the front of the truck squatting down more, until it is
dropping by about the same amount as the rear. If you at least prevent the
front from lifting higher and instead keep it at its original height, than
the rear of the truck should only squat down by 1" or less.

You will benefit from better handling, less bouncing (highway hop) and
more-level headlights when towing at night if you transfer more weight.
This will also create more friction for better sway control at the same
time. If a person's Equal-i-zer Hitch is not transferring weight properly,
it also will not be providing proper sway control.

Which adjustment you do first depends on where your hitch is currently
adjusted to. Can you tell me which hole your L-Brackets are set to
(counting down from the top hole)? How many Spacer Washers are installed
between the Hitch Head and the Shank?

Now here is the next thing to consider: Your trailer is level now, but your
truck happens to be squatting a little too much in the rear. If you reduce
the squat on the back of your truck, what will happen to your trailer? Not
only will the back of the truck lift higher, it will also pull your trailer
higher in the front as well.

My guess is that once you increase your adjustment settings for more even
compression, you may also need to lower the Hitch Head down one hole on the
Shank. But you would only need to do this if your trailer would become more
level if you lowered it one hole, than if you leave it where it is set now.

Like I mentioned in the email earlier this year, sometimes the
perfectly-level hitch ball height will technically be in-between holes on
the Shank. If this is the case, generally you should pick whichever hole
that gets the trailer closest to level (that could be slightly higher or
lower in the front). If the hitch ball is dead-even between two holes, then
pick the lower hole to let your trailer be slightly lower in the front.

I hope this information is helpful. Please respond with your current
adjustment settings, and I will suggest which will be the better long-term
adjustment to make.

Thanks,

Josh Jones
Progress Mfg Inc.
Customer Support
1-800-478-5578
jjones@progressmfg.com
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Old 08-17-2007, 10:53 PM   #14
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Post Fine Tuning the Equal-i-zer, Part 2 of 2

I responded letting him know that currently, there are 5 spacer washers installed and the brackets are in the 4th hole from the top. We had a small exchange on where to get additional washers, since my dealer is three hours away. Then the following reply from Josh:
Quote:
Randall,

First of all, make sure your trailer is
completely loaded up with all the cargo you will normally be towing with
(including water, fuel, etc.). Do not try to do these adjustments if your
trailer is empty or light, unless you plan to tow it that way.

In order to know when you finally have made the correct adjustments, you
need to continue taking your second set of Reference Height Measurements
(Step 12 in the Installation Instructions:
Equal-i-zer® Hitch - Support - Installation Instructions & Parts Breakdown) after each adjustment
you make. You will compare the new installed heights to your original
unloaded heights (Step 1).

These measurements are your gauge to tell you when your hitch is correctly
adjusted. Every time you raise the L-Brackets higher, or every time you add
a Spacer Washer, your Equal-i-zer Hitch will transfer more weight to get
your vehicle compressing more evenly. At the same time, it will also be
increasing the friction for better sway control.

The key here then is to watch your measurements as you make these
adjustments, and then stop adjusting when the measurements show near-equal
compression on both the front and the rear of your tow vehicle. So to get
you going, let's now discuss which adjustment to start with, and then go
from there.

------------------------------------

Ideally, the Spring Arms in their loaded position will be "level" or
parallel with the A-frame of the trailer. This will keep a fairly flat or
even contact as the Spring Arms slide forward and backward on the base of
the L-Brackets. It is ideal to keep them this way for as long as possible.

For most trailers, the Spring Arms are "level" when the L-Brackets are set
in the 4th or 5th hole down from the top, but this can also be dependent on
the coupler position (high, middle, or low or inverted coupler in relation
to the A-frame). With your Spring Arms loaded up when your L-Brackets are
set in the 4th hole down from the top, how level do these arms look?

Would they become more level if the L-Brackets were raised up and set in the
5th hole down? Moving the L-Brackets up or down by one hole will
respectively lift or lower the back end of the Spring Arms by 1". If your
loaded Spring Arms will end up more level when the L-Brackets are raised up
to the 5th hole down, then this is where you should start.

In fact, our Installation Instructions recommend that everyone start with
their L-Brackets set in the 5th hole down from the top, and with 5 Spacer
Washers. After that, at Step 12 they are supposed to check their installed
Reference Height Measurements to see if the vehicle compressed evenly or
not. Some people need to decrease or increase their adjustments.

If one end of the vehicle compressed too much (it is usually the rear), then
there is still too much weight sitting there. More weight needs to be
transferred, and it tells you which adjustments to make in the "Adjustment
Info" box to the right of Step 12 on pg. 3 of the Instructions.

------------------------------------

So if your Spring Arms look too low in the back when they are loaded up,
your first step would be to raise the L-Brackets up one hole to the 5th hole
down from the top. This not only will get the Spring Arms more level in
their loaded position, it will also be an increased adjustment to transfer
more weight off the rear axle, which also creates better sway control at the
same time.

From here, you technically could raise the L-Brackets higher by 2 more holes
(the 6th and then the 7th holes down from the top; the 8th or bottom hole is
not usable). However, this will begin to pull the Spring Arms up higher in
the back, and they will no longer rub flatly on the L-Brackets. If you have
room to add more washers, then you do not need to "max out" the L-Brackets
just yet.

So you should only raise up the L-Brackets until the loaded Spring Arms are
level. After that, you should proceed to make increased adjustments as
needed by adding more Spacer Washers. You can use as many Spacer Washers as
can fit (up to 7 or 8 total), but make sure that they are zinc-hardened.

After you add one washer, compare your new installed measurements to the
initial measurement to watch for the compression to improve. Repeat this
process of adding one washer at a time and then re-measuring, until the tow
vehicle compresses evenly.

If you happen to install all the washers that can fit, yet your measurements
still indicate that you are not compressing evenly (too much rear squat),
now is the acceptable time to return to your L-Brackets for additional
increased adjustments. Now it is okay to raise the L-Brackets higher to the
6th or 7th hole to continue increasing the adjustments.

This will end up pulling the Spring Arms higher in the back, and they will
eventually wear down a groove on the front edge of the L-Brackets, but this
is acceptable if it was the last possible adjustments that you had left.

Those with very heavy trailer and/or tongue weights (compared to the Maximum
Weight Ratings of their Equal-i-zer Hitch) will require near-maximum
adjustments, and may end up with their Spring Arms bending or pulling
higher, and getting more wear on the edge of the L-Brackets.

But as you see noted in Step 12 of the Instructions, it is not the most
important thing to get the Spring Arms level. Rather, it is most important
to get the tow vehicle compressing evenly, after which the trailer ends up
level. So if the Spring Arms eventually need to bend or bow higher, then
that is the way it needs to be for the hitch to perform properly.

------------------------------------

Every Equal-i-zer Hitch is capable of a maximum and minimum range of
adjustment settings. The maximum adjustments would be to use as many Spacer
Washers as can fit (7 or 8), and to raise the L-Brackets up as high as they
can go (7th hole down). These numbers add up to 14 or 15 total adjustment
settings that are possible. That is as far as any Equal-i-zer Hitch can be
adjusted. No further increased adjustments are possible.

Currently you are using 5 Spacer Washers and the 4th hole in the L-Brackets.
This adds up to a total adjustment number of only 9, while your hitch is
capable of 14 or 15 total adjustments. You still have room to make 5 or 6
increased adjustments to transfer more weight and get more sway control.
You can add 2 or 3 more Spacer Washers, and your L-Brackets can be raised up
by 3 more holes.

So this is your recipe for properly adjusting your Equal-i-zer Hitch:

1. Raise or lower the L-Brackets as needed to allow your Spring Arms in
their loaded position to be most "level" or parallel with the A-frame.

2. Then proceed to increase the total adjustments first by adding more
Spacer Washers, or if more adjustment is needed after the washers have been
"maxed-out", proceed by raising the L-Brackets higher.

3. Check your new installed measurements (Step 12) after every increased
adjustment so that you can stop adjusting when the tow vehicle begins
compressing down by nearly-equal amounts in both the front and the rear.

4. Observe what is happening to your trailer as you improve the weight
transfer and compression on your tow vehicle, and reposition the Hitch Head
up or down on the Shank as needed if the trailer needs to become more level.


As I mentioned earlier, your trailer may end up a little too high in the
front after you improve the compression on the tow vehicle, since the
trailer is currently "level". You may need to end up lowering the Hitch
Head down by 1 set of holes on the Shank, so that the trailer ends up level
only after getting the most even compression on the tow vehicle.

It may be good if I clarify that a "level" trailer means that the trailer is
PARALLEL to the road surface, not necessarily level by the bubble. You
could be parked on a steep hill and have the bubble tipped all the way to
one end, yet still have the trailer "parallel" to the road. This is what
your trailer should end up like: parallel to the road.

Using a bubble can be misleading, unless you use two of them: one on the
trailer, and one on the ground. Your trailer is "level" or parallel to the
ground if both bubbles are in the same position (which doesn't necessarily
have to be in the middle, or the commonly referred-to "level" position).

A tape measure may be a better tool to use. Just make sure that the front
of the trailer frame and the back of the trailer frame are equal distances
from the ground, and then you know the trailer is "level" or parallel. Also
be sure that the frame (or any other spot on the front and back) are on a
consistently horizontal plane together, so that you know they should both be
the same height off the ground if the trailer is "level".

------------------------------------

And finally, any time you undo the Hitch Head from the Shank, you need to
correctly repeat the proper steps to reinstall the Hitch Head. This will
begin in Step 5 of the Instructions, where you DO NOT FULLY TIGHTEN THE 3/4"
SHANK BOLTS. Instead, you only twist the nuts on to basically pin the Hitch
Head to the Shank.

Then you go to Step 6, where you tighten up the Angle Set Screw the first of
2 times. As you do this, it will cause the loose Hitch Head to rotate
upward until all the Spacer Washers are tightly pressed into the Shank.

After that, you proceed through Steps 9-11 to hitch up. Basically, by the
time you get to Step 12 you are completely hitched up and ready to tow,
except for some loose bolts (the 3/4" Shank Bolts and the Angle Set Bolt
loosens up).

At Step 12, you check your measurements to see if the compression is even on
the front and rear of the tow vehicle. If the compression is not even and
you need to continue adjusting by adding Spacer Washers, you need to
disconnect the Hitch Head from the Shank to add more washers, then start
over again to reconnect everything at Step 5.

Every time you need to add/subtract Spacer Washers or you need to move the
Hitch Head up or down on the Shank, you need to properly reinstall the Hitch
Head starting in Step 5. So this is essentially a "loop" in the
instructions until your compression measurements in Step 12 are even.

Now assuming that you have made all the correct adjustments and you get even
compression when you measure in Step 12. Now is the time to proceed to Step
13a and 13b. In Step 13a, you are going to tighten up the Angle Set Bolt
for the second time, while the large 3/4" Shank Bolts are still loose.

However, this time around the trailer is coupled to the hitch ball, and the
Spring Arms are loaded up and ready to tow. The Angle Set Bolt is tightened
until it presses tightly against the Shank, which will ensure that the
Spacer Rivet & Washers will also stay tightly pressing against the Shank.

After doing this (and with the trailer still coupled and the Spring Arms
still loaded), only now do you proceed to Step 13b where you fully tighten
up the 3/4" Shank Bolts up to 200 ft. lbs. of torque. Do not do Step 13a
and 13b until your measurements in Step 12 indicate that you have even
compression, and your trailer is "level" or parallel.

------------------------------------

I hope this has clearly helped explain the adjustment and measurement
process so that you can correctly re-adjust your Equal-i-zer Hitch. If you
have any questions about this, or if you would like to just run your new
compression measurements by me, please let me know.

Thanks,

Josh Jones
Progress Mfg Inc.
Customer Support
1-800-478-5578
jjones@progressmfg.com
I thought these messages were pretty detailed and informative, so I wanted to share them with the other Equal-i-zer owners out there.

Randy
__________________

__________________
Randy and Pat Godfrey
Region 3 2nd VP, Newsletter Editor, Florida Unit
WBCCI# 7591 - AIR# 17017
2014 27FB Flying Cloud - SilverCabin II
2006 Lincoln Mark LT - Hoke

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