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Old 08-01-2012, 10:49 PM   #1
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does angle affect handling, and other ???

By increasing the angle of the torsion arm do you affect the handling of the trailer or is it simply a matter of elevation gain? Why would someone the angle at 0 deg?

Is there a means of storing a trailer so that the dura torque axles do not degrade, ie placing on stands?

Do redial tires handle better than the bias tires? Better mileage?
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Old 08-01-2012, 11:54 PM   #2
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The more angle on the torsion arm, the more shock gets translated into a vertical vector into the trailer. To better imagine this, envision what would happen if you could twist the torsion arm so it was completely vertical... it would absorb no vertical shock at all. The maximum suspension effect would be so the arm equally deflects up and down.

You can off-load a certain preloading of the axels using stabilizers, but the Airstream frame is not strong enough to be suspended completely by blocking it up on the ends... there is too much flex to store it like that.

Radials vs. bias-ply is a complicated debate... on a vehicle they handle better and offer a flatter contact patch. Bias-ply tend to resist deforming better when sitting... which a lot of trailers do. Bias-ply tend to be less expensive to make... so that also feeds into their use on infrequently-used trailers. You won't ever find agreement on anything tire-related, as everyone has a story about a different tire blowing up and wrecking their day (and/or trailer).
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Old 08-02-2012, 12:38 AM   #3
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Just a couple of things.
Stabilizers should never be used to support the weight of the trailer, they are just stablizers.
You can support the trailer up on jack stands to take the pressure off the axles. Just jack the trailer up one side at a time and put jackstands next to the axles on the frame. Make sure your on level concrete to be safe. There are lots of threads with pictures showing how to do this. Use the search button on the forum page to get to those threads and have fun reading.
My trailer is in storage right now and it's a 27' and is in jack stands with the tires off the ground. Raise the front jack on the tongue to keep the trailer level front to back.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:41 AM   #4
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Torsion axles are designed to have about a 15 degree downward angle when loaded to the design load.
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Old 08-02-2012, 07:46 AM   #5
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I doubt blocking up the trailer to take the weight off the axles will extent the axle life. Seems to me the rubber axle rods will loose their flexibility as they age at a constant rate regardless.
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Old 08-02-2012, 10:26 AM   #6
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Here is a link to a popular thread that may help you if you decide to put the trailer on jack stands.



http://www.airforums.com/forums/f457...eam-18435.html
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Old 08-02-2012, 11:53 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by HowieE View Post
Torsion axles are designed to have about a 15 degree downward angle when loaded to the design load.
Whoever told you that is misinformed.
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Old 08-03-2012, 08:59 AM   #8
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Manufacturers have various ranges that the angle can be set at. Most prefer an unloaded angle of about 24 degrees down. They can usually be set from 45 degrees down to about 20 degrees up, when unloaded. It isn't a good idea to have an empty weight angle above 0 degrees, but it can be done. So, to get to the point, the best empty weight angle range, on most rubber torsion axles, is from around 24 degrees down to 0 degrees. This will give you the best performance from your axle. The ranges can exceed that range in both directions, but not with the best performance.
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Old 08-04-2012, 01:01 PM   #9
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angle

Having read through all the posts I had thought that the rubber would degrade over time regardless, but storing the trailer on stands probably adds to the longevity of the axle. No real history to go on to say that this is actually the case. It seems that all the trailers left just sitting end up with the axle frozen in the load position, so it would seem to make sense to keep them on stands when they are left for longer periods of time say over 3 months.

First thanks for the reply's.

On the discussion of the angle set I had been thinking that the 45 deg would elevate the trailer and give a better ride since it would have a longer period of travel to 0 deg , but it seems that the travel is limited to a certain distance regardless of the angle set. As one person said the ride is less even since the "vector is close to vertical".

What I had been thinking is that by increasing the angle down I could get some added elevation. Does increasing the angle set add anything to the elevation of the trailer.

If we have any real engineers in the crowd I would love to hear some real facts on loading. I am near the point of ordering new axles and would like to 1. buy them and have the angle and elevation where I want it and have a stable ride on the inside. 2. know that it makes sense to store them on jacks off loading the axles.
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Old 08-04-2012, 01:40 PM   #10
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Storing with the load off for an extended period will do nothing other than have the rubber "frozen" at a higher angle. The best thing is to (gasp!) use the trailer. Tow it to campgrounds, go on trips.
The higher the starting angle, the more vertical shock is transferred to the frame and structure. It becomes very noticeable with starting angles of 40 degrees and above.
Again, just because the trailing arms are at zero degrees when the trailer is sitting with weight on them, that is exactly where they should be with a 22 degree starting angle. Jack the trailer up, and watch how far the wheels drop when weight is removed. Every brand new Airstream trailer on our lot has the trailing arms at zero degrees.
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Old 08-05-2012, 09:51 AM   #11
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thanks !!!!!!!!!!!

What I was trying to find out was what exactly was the correct angle. Is there any correlation between angle and elevation. I wanted the trailer to sit a bit higher , which I guess it won't even if you set it at 45. I now won't increase the angle due to the variation in smoothness of ride to increased angle. So its good to know the facts.

The question on degrading of the axle rubber was asked to find out if I should wait another year before installing new axles since it may be that long before I am completed my remodeling and have a vehicle purchased and refit to pull the trailer. After looking at the tags on several trailers it appears that most are old to begin with even after installation at the factory, which may not be the case these days.

Thanks for the info.
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