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Old 06-05-2009, 08:55 AM   #29
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Premium Ride shocks

Funkill, thanks for doing all that digging. I, too, have the load leveling shocks (2004 Avalanche, Premium Ride) and have had difficulty getting a good read on what to do about it. As many "It'll be OKs" as "No Ways"s. Most people assume it's a conventional load leveling system. I found all of the GM instructions you refer to, but credit Andy R with knowing a thing or two about this and have been skeptical (thanks for all of your contributions, Andy). The old data is probably referring to load-leveling "systems", not just shocks - still.... Andy's article seems to suggest that even if you get everything set up properly, the truck will find a way to foil you over time. Could the simplest solution be to just replace the shocks with non-leveling ones? None of my GM sources would buy into any kind of change to the truck or suggest a specific shock to replace the current ones with. What could be wrong with just using the ones that come with the regular truck? Is there something else to that Premium Ride option that isn't apparent? (Already replaced the factory tires with LT, E load range tires.)
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Old 06-05-2009, 09:47 AM   #30
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Funkill, thanks for doing all that digging. I, too, have the load leveling shocks (2004 Avalanche, Premium Ride) and have had difficulty getting a good read on what to do about it. As many "It'll be OKs" as "No Ways"s. Most people assume it's a conventional load leveling system. I found all of the GM instructions you refer to, but credit Andy R with knowing a thing or two about this and have been skeptical (thanks for all of your contributions, Andy). The old data is probably referring to load-leveling "systems", not just shocks - still.... Andy's article seems to suggest that even if you get everything set up properly, the truck will find a way to foil you over time. Could the simplest solution be to just replace the shocks with non-leveling ones? None of my GM sources would buy into any kind of change to the truck or suggest a specific shock to replace the current ones with. What could be wrong with just using the ones that come with the regular truck? Is there something else to that Premium Ride option that isn't apparent? (Already replaced the factory tires with LT, E load range tires.)
The basic problem with an automatic leveling system, is that it will continually fight what the load equalizing hitch is trying to do, namely, move weight.

If the system decides to add air, then it also adds weight to the rear end of the tow vehicle, and takes it away from the steering axle. If that added weight to the rear gets high enough, which will vary for each different rig, then loss of control, could happen.

Andy
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Old 06-05-2009, 10:06 AM   #31
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Government Motors will never learn.

Back in the 70s they had a leveling system on the Suburbans that changed the braking ratio between the front and rear brakes. When the Suburban was sitting level with a WD hitch, and lots of weight on the rear wheels, the rear brakes were at min.

Most people disconnected the system as soon as they realized they had no rear brakes.

The best thing to do with the load leveling system while towing is disconnect it.
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Old 06-05-2009, 12:48 PM   #32
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[quote=HowieE;705814]Government Motors will never learn.

Back in the 70s they had a leveling system on the Suburbans that changed the braking ratio between the front and rear brakes. When the Suburban was sitting level with a WD hitch, and lots of weight on the rear wheels, the rear brakes were at min.

Most people disconnected the system as soon as they realized they had no rear brakes.

The best thing to do with the load leveling system while towing is disconnect it.[/quote]


How do you disconnect hydraulic, self leveling shocks while towing?

After reading my manual, it appears as though the addition of an equalizing hitch was understood and a method for adjustment was provided. Since my initial attempt to adjust my WD hitch on this TV were ineffective, I'll see what driving for a few miles before attaching does for it! And my initial thought is that if the shocks were increased, it would apply more load to the steering axle?? I'd think more about that, but I'll probably forget after my meeting in 10 minutes... I'm going to do al little work at the CAT scales soon. I report my findings and notes on how it rides, if the shocks appear to re-adjust (maybe it will be evident by the new angle that would impose at the hitch point???), etc.
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Old 06-05-2009, 02:31 PM   #33
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How do you disconnect hydraulic, self leveling shocks while towing?

I have not seen this system but I have to assume it has an electrical component. If that is the case I would assume there is a fuse that can be removed while towing.

Hydraulics alone could not be self adjusting.
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Old 06-05-2009, 03:05 PM   #34
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the catch to my question was *while towing*. My attempt at adding some humor. Future attempts will be refrained. I was imagining me trying to do something other than just reading the paper *while towing*. Sorry. Refrain didn't last long.
Laura
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Old 06-05-2009, 08:50 PM   #35
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Hydraulics alone could not be self adjusting.
Add some valving, differential hydraulic chambers and a pump. I've seem these on Volvos, didn't know it was the same system as used on the GMs.
Brake & Front End: The Complete Undercar Service Magazine - Nivomat Shock...

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Old 06-15-2009, 12:57 PM   #36
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How do you disconnect hydraulic, self leveling shocks while towing?

I have not seen this system but I have to assume it has an electrical component. If that is the case I would assume there is a fuse that can be removed while towing.

Hydraulics alone could not be self adjusting.

After my recent trip to the shop, I found that the shocks are fully mechanical. No electrical component what-so-ever. The mechanic even demonstrated by jumping on the bumper for quite awhile times to show how the shock became more *rigid* and pumped itself up a bit to overcome the bouncing. At least that's how he explained it. Though I couldn't discern a change in final bumper height after the bouncing!
Laura
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Old 06-15-2009, 12:59 PM   #37
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I have not seen this system but I have to assume it has an electrical component. If that is the case I would assume there is a fuse that can be removed while towing.

Hydraulics alone could not be self adjusting.

After my recent trip to the shop, I found that the shocks (self-adjusting level-control) are fully mechanical. No electrical component what-so-ever. The mechanic even demonstrated by jumping on the bumper for quite awhile to show how the shock became more *rigid* and pumped itself up a bit to overcome the bouncing. At least that's how he explained it. Though I couldn't discern an increase in final bumper/hitch height after the bouncing!
Laura
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