Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
 
Old 03-06-2006, 07:35 PM   #169
Rivet Master
 
safari57's Avatar
 
1951 21' Flying Cloud
1960 24' Tradewind
West Coast , BC
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 3,790
Images: 10
Send a message via MSN to safari57
Here's one I found on a for sale website that shows pics of what these look like for those who do not know. It would appear that the one in BC/WA and this one are quite similar.

http://images.google.ca/imgres?imgur...lr%3D%26sa%3DN
__________________

__________________
safari57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2006, 08:12 PM   #170
Rivet Master
 
Condoluminum's Avatar
 
1988 25' Excella
Sunnyvale , California
Join Date: Jul 2003
Posts: 1,858
Images: 13
Send a message via AIM to Condoluminum
Other places to look: Hemmings

Kathy-

Good luck in your search for vintage.. If you study most of the Airstream ads in the 60's, they were being pulled by large sedans and wagons, and only on Major Caravans, like Capetown to Cairo, did trucks and Travelalls dominate.

In the mid 60's, large Ford Galaxy and Country Sedan/Squire Wagons could pull a trailer, as could Chevy Impala Wagons. All were more comfortable to drive than trucks of same era, usually with automatics and air conditioning... Few published tow capacity in owners manuals, so trustworthy hitch shop is important. For entertainment purposes, try to rent or watch Long Long Trailer with Lucy and Desi.. Tow vehicle for huge trailer was 1952 Mercury V8, though it was barely up to it, and needed dolly to handle hitch weight...

Hemmings Motor News is largest source of classified ads for collectable and vintage cars.. Try searching their website at : http://www.hemmings.com/index.cfm

John McG
__________________

__________________
Condoluminum

In Theory, there's no difference between Theory and Practice, but in Practice, there is usually a difference...
Condoluminum is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2006, 08:28 PM   #171
Mel
Rivet Master
 
Mel's Avatar
 
1967 22' Safari
1960 Caravel
Edmonds , Washington
Join Date: Dec 2004
Posts: 1,445
Quote:
Originally Posted by safari57
Found this in the latest Vancouver, BC Buy and Sell:

1966 CHEVROLET SUBURBAN 327 w auto, Washington state truck, v clean, lwr'd rally whls, new tires, dual exh...

Barry
Thanks Barry! Will see what I can find out about this one...
__________________
Mel
Mel is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2006, 08:47 PM   #172
Rivet Master
 
safari57's Avatar
 
1951 21' Flying Cloud
1960 24' Tradewind
West Coast , BC
Join Date: Feb 2005
Posts: 3,790
Images: 10
Send a message via MSN to safari57
Kathy, my buddy has a '66 Impala stationwagon, power steering, brakes, airconditioning, tilt wheel, nice aftermarket stereo, it's a very nice highway cruiser and has a towing capacity of 6,000 lbs. It can easily pull a lot of the airstreams, has good brakes, and is easy to fix by any garage. He was using a '54 Ford stationwagon that had been upgraded with similar options but it's just a bit smaller and he wanted the extra size for towing, but still wanted a car ride and car functionality when he wasn't towing the trailer. He found it in the local recylcler paper.

There's a ton of these cars available. Wagons were the two vehicles of choice for most families in the 60's and early 70's until trucks really started to come on strong as luxury options. Chev, Ford, Chrysler all had great wagons in the 60's, were built for towing in many cases or are easily upgraded with aftermarket transmission coolers and hitches, and are inexpensive to maintain and insure.

I use a 1957 Pontiac wagon that has all 70's suspension and motor and transmission. It tows our Airstream and pretty much anything else I put behind it with no problems, is inexpensive to fix and insure and yes, it does use more gas, but in the overall scheme of things it's still far cheaper than buying new.

Barry
__________________
safari57 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-06-2006, 10:52 PM   #173
3 Rivet Member
 
1965 26' Overlander
1990 34' Excella
Vintage Kin Owner
1975 20' Argosy 20
Upper Black Eddy , PA
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 100
Images: 1
Considering Travelall and Wagons

OK--I'm starting to look at vintage wagons (due to luxury factor), but I have another general question--this might be a dumb question:

I was under the impression that a trailer should be, at maximum, 85% of the weight of the vehicle. The dry weight of my Overlander is about 4200 lbs, the wet weight is probably around 5000-5200 lbs. Looking at vintage wagons that I've been looking (all V8's), and Travelalls for that matter, their weights are around 4800 lbs--that means that the loaded trailer is heavier than the tow vehicle. How is that handled?

Are there any particular makes/models/years of wagons that would be better (or worse) for towing?

Kathy
__________________
kdenault is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2006, 09:03 AM   #174
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,067
Images: 13
I have never heard of that 85% rule. And that rule is broken many times. The over the road tractor trailer (18 wheeler) tow up to 80,000 pounds. That would mean the truck (tractor) needs to weigh 95,000 pounds. It doesn't happen.

My full sized van listed below is just shy of 4000 pounds and my towed load of Overlander is 5000 pounds. The rate max load of my van from the factory is 7500 pounds. Ford set that limit. I also tow a 7000 boat and trailer. Both are towed rather well with few issues.

I do not understand the 85% rule. May be you can talk to the person that told you the rule and get some clarification. There may be more parts to it. Like ........
if the trailer doesn't have brakes or
if tow vehicle is under a certain weight
if the tow vehicle doesn't have the equipment necessary to tow
if the towing specs are not known

or????????????

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2006, 09:18 AM   #175
Naysayer
 
Boondocker's Avatar

 
1968 24' Tradewind
Louisville , earth
Join Date: Jun 2005
Posts: 4,635
Images: 7
Send a message via Yahoo to Boondocker
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdenault
.........
I was under the impression that a trailer should be, at maximum, 85% of the weight of the vehicle. .....
Kathy

I wonder if you are confusing this with the rule of thumb that you should stay under 85% of the vehicles tow capicity?
__________________
Rodney

Visit my photography page
and the
Favorite camp grounds project map
My Blog

(The artist formerly known as General Disarray)

Boondocker is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2006, 10:00 AM   #176
Moderator dude
 
Action's Avatar

 
1966 26' Overlander
Phoenix , Arizona
Join Date: Apr 2002
Posts: 6,067
Images: 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by kdenault
Are there any particular makes/models/years of wagons that would be better (or worse) for towing?
Kathy
Not that I am aware of. I am most familar with Ford/Lincoln/Mercury line up. And as a general rule you want full size versus smaller. (Example Ford Country Squire verus Ford Falcon) And how the vehicle is equipped can make a difference.

Like you want a vehicle that has the bigger cooling system, larger alternator, and ........ Well if the vehicle came with A/C it has most of those bigger items.

Power steering and power brakes would be on my list of options. And Ford did not require (they recommended only) these options. Check axle ratio for towing capacity.

For towing 4200 #'s expect to do some work on the vehicle when you get it. (Car truck or whatever????)
Springs
HD shocks
Transmission cooler
Service cooling system
Wider tires if they are small (not taller)

40 year old springs in the rear of anything is likely seen better days. Replace them or get something else to help out. Air springs, air shocks or ??? - I replaced the coil springs on my '66 Merc. It made a world of difference.

There are some specs out there for towing. They are not as readily available as modern day data and data is still out there. If you choose a Ford product car I have most of all the data you would need for the '60 and 70's. Just give a shout.

>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Action
__________________
1966 Mercury Park Lane 4 DR Breezeway 410 4V, C-6, 2.80 - Streamless.
1966 Lincoln 4 door Convertible 462 4V 1971 Ford LTD Convertible 429 4V Phoenix ~ Yeah it's hot however it's a dry heat!
Action is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-07-2006, 07:12 PM   #177
3 Rivet Member
 
1965 26' Overlander
1990 34' Excella
Vintage Kin Owner
1975 20' Argosy 20
Upper Black Eddy , PA
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 100
Images: 1
Rodney,
Yep, that's it!! i knew it was 85% of something . Ohhh well, I think I've reached information overload: last week--bought the Airstream, this week--looking into vintage tow-- boy, my head hurts!!

and the search continues!

Kathy
__________________
kdenault is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2006, 06:29 AM   #178
2 Rivet Member
 
wagongirl's Avatar
 
1967 20' Globetrotter
Vintage Kin Owner
detroit , Michigan
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 59
Images: 11
Kathy, Wagons are great!! We love our Ford. Ours is a 1958 2dr ranch wagon that my husband had updated to 1970's trans, engine & drive train and then custom hitch had to be fabricated. All the work except for the hitch was done by him so the cost was not bad, but still we sunk quite a bit of "doe ray me" into it over a peroid of 2 years.
There are some nice late 60's and 70's wagons that could handle it. I'm sure you can find one that has been kept up or updated. Good luck with your search.
Beth
__________________
wagongirl is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2006, 09:02 PM   #179
3 Rivet Member
 
1965 26' Overlander
1990 34' Excella
Vintage Kin Owner
1975 20' Argosy 20
Upper Black Eddy , PA
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 100
Images: 1
possible models??

So my search continues. I've begun looking at cars instaed of trucks (though, I'm still undecided). I'm curious about a couple 1965 vintage cars and their appropriateness as a dedicated TV: Ford Thunderbird, Ford Fury, Chevy Malibu (283 small block engine), and a Chevy Impala (also a 283 engine).

Kathy
__________________
kdenault is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2006, 10:32 PM   #180
Moderator Emeritus
 
overlander64's Avatar
 
1964 26' Overlander
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre
Anna , Illinois
Join Date: Sep 2002
Posts: 5,396
Images: 183
Send a message via Yahoo to overlander64
Vintage Tow Vehicles

Greetings Kathy!

Quote:
Originally Posted by kdenault
So my search continues. I've begun looking at cars instaed of trucks (though, I'm still undecided). I'm curious about a couple 1965 vintage cars and their appropriateness as a dedicated TV: Ford Thunderbird, Ford Fury, Chevy Malibu (283 small block engine), and a Chevy Impala (also a 283 engine).

Kathy
Of those cars that you mention, the Thunderbird would be the most likely match for your Overlander (IMHO). The Malibu would be overwhelmed by a coach that is likely to approach 6,000 pounds ready for vacation (my '64 Overlander typically runs closer to 6,100 pounds). While the Impala would be a close call on wheelbase, the 283 cubic inch motor would be smaller than I would consider for the task. The Plymouth Fury of the period could be an adequate choice if it has the 383 cubic inch motor.

One thing to keep in mind with the pre-1970 vintage tow vehicles is that the motors didn't have hardened valve seats to accommodate the unleaded fuels that we use today. It only takes a few miles of towing to begin to develop valve recission -- it is possible (but expensive) to have specially hardened valve seats machined into the heads to prevent the problem -- I had this done on my '65 Dodge Coronet 500's 383 cubic inch V8 back when I first started towing with it in 1980 (but only after I had developed the valve recission issue), and even then the cost of the modification was nearly $2,000.

My suggestion would be to look for a tow vehicle that has at least one of the larger V8s (350 cubic inch+) in what would have been considered to be a full-size car at the time. While I have towed my Overlander with my '65 Dodge Coronet 500 (383 cubic inch V8), it lacks the physical size as a mid-sized car to truly handle the Overlander -- plenty of power but a bit short on wheelbase and weight to manage the Overlander. I know that the original owners of my Overlander towed with a 1964 Mercury (390 cubic inch V8), then a 1970 Mercury (390 cubic inch V8), which was followed by a 1975 Oldsmobile 98 (455 cubic inch V8). Initially, I thought that the original owners of my Overlander were purchasing larger engines than necessary, but I have learned that the big block V8 makes for a more pleasurable towing experience for my frequent trips to the Rocky Mountain region. I wouldn't, however, suggest the 1967-1978 Cadillac Eldorado or 1966-1978 Oldsmobile Tornado as tow vehicles as even though they have the heft and power to handle an Overlander their mechanical complexities (due to their application of front wheel drive) and difficulty in finding replacement suspension parts create many headaches for towing applications.

Good luck with your search for a Vintage tow vehicle!

Kevin
__________________
Kevin D. Allen
WBCCI (Lifetime Member)/VAC/Free Wheelers #6359
AIR #827
1964 Overlander International/1999 GMC K2500 Suburban (7400 VORTEC/4.11 Differentials)
1978 Argosy Minuet 6.0 Metre/1975 Cadillac Eldorado Convertible (8.2 Liter V8/2.70 Final Drive)
overlander64 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-10-2006, 11:06 PM   #181
1 Rivet Member
 
1965 24' Tradewind
lakewood , California
Join Date: Mar 2006
Posts: 6
Arrow vintage tow vehicle

I have been looking for the right vintage tow vehicle for several months. I couldn't decide to go with a suburban or wagon. I decided on a wagon with the vinyl wood sides. They look so classic to me. I got a 68 Country Squire with the 390 so it will have no problem hauling my 24'. Although I prefer earlier years, the 68 has original disc brakes, power steering, power brakes and air conditioning which I really wanted cuz I drive in So. California most of the time.
The suspension must be beefed up though.
__________________
mickfly is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2006, 12:14 AM   #182
3 Rivet Member
 
1965 26' Overlander
1990 34' Excella
Vintage Kin Owner
1975 20' Argosy 20
Upper Black Eddy , PA
Join Date: Nov 2005
Posts: 100
Images: 1
Pre-1970's TV valve issue?

Kevin,
thank you for your response. You always provide such great info--it's truely appreciated! Regarding the valve recission issue--is this problematic for all pre-1970's vehicles? When looking around for a vehicle, I don't recall reading about valve replacement/modification in the descriptions. This applies to pick-ups, cars, wagons, and IH's that I've been looking at. This would seem to me to be somewhat of a major issue, and quite costly to deal with. It seems like this would not be an optional fix whenconsidering a pre-1970's vehicle. Is there anything that I should be looking for when considering a pre-1970's vehicle that would indicate that this issue has been dealt with?
Kathy
__________________

__________________
kdenault is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off



Virginia Campgrounds

Reviews provided by




Copyright 2002- Social Knowledge, LLC All Rights Reserved.

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 01:30 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8 Beta 1
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.

Airstream is a registered trademark of Airstream Inc. All rights reserved. Airstream trademark used under license to Social Knowledge LLC.